1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 MkII Barn Find

1957 Aston Martin Db2 4 Barnfind

This 1957 Aston Martin DB2/4 MkII sold at an auction a few weeks ago in Monterey California, but we wanted to revisit it because of its story and photos. Reader Matt S brought it to our attention and filled us in on a few details.

1957 Aston Martin Db2 4 Barnfind Front

This British beauty was just discovered in a garage in Malibu California. It had been sitting there since the ’70s when the owner parked it. The owner was a woman who had seen a similar car in the 60′s and feel in love. She located this car and used it as a her daily driver until the mid 70s .

1957 Aston Martin Db2 4 Barnfind Rear

Her son remembers the sound of that exhaust when his mother was headed down the road to pick him up from school. We doubt many kids would mind having their parents pick them up from school if they showed up in a DB2/4…

1957 Aston Martin Db2 4 Barnfind Interior

Anyways, this car looks rough but is claimed to be very solid and complete. The woman that owned it had always wanted to restore the car but her eyesight was failing her so she decided to sell it instead.

1957 Aston Martin Db2 4 Barnfind Side

It was sold through Bonhams and went for $87,750. Big money, but remember that this is an Aston Martin. No news has surfaced on what will become of the car, but we sort of hope that they just clean it up and drive it because we think it looks great just as it is. Anyone here agree? Or should it be restored?

Comments

  1. Andreas

    I agree it should get a nice full check-up, dust it down a bit and drive it!

  2. Bear

    RESTORE IT! …before it deteriorates any further!!

  3. Patrick

    No Restoration..fix the things that are damaged or worn out and PRESERVE IT….they’re only ORGINAL ONCE AND DRIVE IT W/LOVE!!

  4. curtis McMillan

    I would do a nut to bolt restoration. Why let it decay.

  5. Daniel

    that car has to be restored back to the original condition that is a part of history and a beautiful car at that.

  6. Michael

    Let’s see, how it looks like after a good cleaning and detailing. I bet you, not too bad, minus the interior.

  7. Neil McElhannon

    Restore it!

  8. psbat

    How did thay get those photos like that.. ??? lOOKS LIKE A TOY YET ITS NOT SHOT IN TOY MODE. as you can see its all infocus… Nice

  9. gary foster

    A truly wonderful car but I have to say that keeping it as a great driver gets my vote ,just because it is going to be driven means it will decay further! im sure any body that has ever drove one of D.B.s finest would let it fall apart or be neglected. I personally know of two very similar DB2/4 s both have received beautiful restorations and have never been driven on the road in decades ,locked away safe and sound rarely seen by the public and never enjoyed as Mr Brown had intended them to be.Fix what needs to be done but do not over restore it and not let it live

  10. Chris H.

    I wouldn’t even wash it! I’d wear an odd mish-mash of clothing styles while driving this, and fully attempt to perpetrate the story that I am a lost time traveler.

  11. Patrick

    Works for me Chris..not so sure about the not washing it…it’s really got a lot of grunge on it!!!??

  12. Bill Shaw

    Hmm, engine has not turned over in 30+ years. If it is sezied (probably), restore it. Wash & polish the body, rechrome the bumpers, restore the interior.

  13. gary foster

    oh yes i would wash the dirt off and polish the chrome but if its got some pits here or there so be it ,if the motor is froze you have no choice but to take it out and do whats required to bring it back to running condition if bearing are needed or new rings of course that should all be done and new hoses and brakes,new lines for safetys sake, just as if there are tears in the leather sew them up as best you can but replace as little as you can

  14. Mark Pfeifer

    The world already has plenty of “nut and bolt restoration” AM’s sitting around in climate controlled obscurity. Anyone who has $90k to drop on a toy also has plenty of money to pay a mechanic to do routine maintenance to keep it from “decaying”.Car clubs and concours really should all have a “survivor” class for judging…….

  15. Pete

    The car’s patina is what gives it character – lets the world know that it was loved and used, as it was designed to be. I personally feel that a complete restoration is only called for if a car is found in such poor condition (ie: basket case, fire, crash, etc) that it cannot be appreciated or driven. You don’t see them like this very often – keep it worn, but maintained !

  16. Reuben Adkins

    Without a doubt, restore it.

  17. Antonio

    Don’t make this a trailer queen, these cars were meant to be driven. I would just pay close attention to the suspension and drive train, once sorted out, off to weekend vintage racing!

  18. Bruce

    This looks like a Tickford model produced after David Brown bought the plant. Prior ones did not have the emblems just above the side vents. I owned number 77 of the 199 car series. Just like my 79 year old wife I’m happy to have her buy new clothes and fix her hair before going out in public, a wonderful automobile shouldn’t be treated with less respect.

  19. Barrie Robinson

    I run the Aston Martin Feltham Club and am restoring an 1957 DB 2/4 MkII. It was in a similar condition when I bought it in 1985 for $4,500. Cars in this condition need to be restored even if one just has the engine overhauled as well a brakes etc etc. Rubber will have perished, rust has probably eaten into important places, seals and gaskets will be like cooked cardboard. But new paint job and interior is up to the owner. Vintage racing – well that is another story – spoke wheels, rebound rubbers, springs, shocks

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