EXCLUSIVE: 40k Mile 1980 Cadillac Coupe DeVille

Jesse MortensenBy Jesse Mortensen

Here’s a nice big cruiser for someone who wants to experience what Cadillac used to be all about. This Coupe DeVille is well-built and with only 40k showing on the odometer, there’s a lot of life left in it. Scott, the seller, claims that he purchased it from the original owner’s estate and that the mileage is correct. There’s no rust and some maintenance work has already been done so it should be ready to be enjoyed. It’s located in Lincolnton, North Carolina and Scott would like to get $7,500. Please use the form below to contact him if you’re interested.

An odometer reading does not necessarily reflect actual mileage. Gauges can break and with only five digits, they can turn over once or twice. So, when dealing with cars like this you have to look at the wear surfaces and documentation to really know what you are getting. This car might be too old for a CarFax, but an inspection may be a good idea if you’re not close enough to take a look in person. There are a lot of low-mileage Caddys out there though and this one looks very good, so it’s probably safe to assume that the mileage is accurate.

The interior is claimed to be perfect with no cracks.  This photo isn’t the best, but take  a close look at those seating surfaces and seat belts. Looks pretty clean to me! It’s had a new radiator and hoses installed. The shocks are new and the tires are about 80%. The transmission was also flushed and serviced, so there aren’t be any immediate needs. Keep up the maintenance and this car should provide someone with years of comfortable service.

You had better be okay with listening to the radio on your daily commute though because it would be a crying shame to hack up that dash or cut any wires just to be able to listen to your MP3s. Besides, where will you ever find a replacement head unit with wood grain knobs? Scott didn’t mention anything about the A/C system, so I’d want to get that checked out before we get too much farther into summer. You’re not going to miss any of the modern features, because this thing has everything you need!

There are a few dings and scratches, but this Cadillac presents nicely. The rear fillers are cracked and the fronts are new. Nothing major in the visual department though. The asking price may seem high, but I checked values for similar condition DeVilles and it’s actually reasonable. Compare this car to what double the money would get you new today and it starts to look like a downright bargain. What do you think – is this something you’d daily drive?

Thanks for listing this with us Scott! We hope it finds a good home. If any of you have a low-mileage survivor sitting in the garage, please consider listing it as an Exclusive here on Barn Finds!

Contact The Seller

Sorry, this one has SOLD!

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Comments

  1. jaymes

    gorgeous!

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  2. Rabbit

    Looks really nice. The big question is does the 8-6-4 still work?

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    • ags290

      I don’t see the Diesel badge on the front fender, but if it is a late production car it could also have the 4100 V-6. The early eighties were a great time to be a heavy line tech in a Cadillac dealership.

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    • Ulysses Lawrence

      It’s a 1980 just a carburated 368

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    • Lux O'Barge

      The ’80 should have a regular ol’ 368 without the 8-6-4; far as I know no horror stories are associated with that engine.

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    • Keith

      Cadillac introduced the V8-6-4 disaster in 1981. The 1980 Devilles came with the 368 cu in big block.

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  3. Kevin Wernick

    Some cars are destined to be classics. And then there’s the ones that aren’t.

    1+
  4. Anastos

    Cassettes were an option on these…you can find them to fit on eBay or a junkyard…

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  5. Bill

    Beautiful automobile! Notice I didn’t say “car.”

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    • Bingo

      Thumbs up

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  6. Steve Adams

    1980 Cadillacs came with a 6.0 liter (Olds 350 in California) gas engine, or an Olds Diesel. There doesn’t seem to be a diesel plaque where it would normally be, and since its in N.C. it most likely has the 6.0 gas engine. The 8-6-4 engine appeared only one year (1981) in passenger cars. However, it was used in 1982 commercial chassis.

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  7. Greg

    The 4100 was a V8 not a V6.

    The 8-6-4 was introduced in 1981.

    1980 was a great year because it had the restyling but the plain 368 for only 1 year. Pretty reliable motor.

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    • JoeR

      My father had an 80 Seville with the 368….very little power, and died a terrible death around 55K. He was pissed because he wasn’t finished paying it off.

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    • Mike H

      Late in the 1980 model year run the 252 in³ (4.1L) 4V Buick V6 (125 net hp!) was available on Cadillac models; The V6 option itself was a $165 credit over the standard V8 on the DeVille and was purchased by the cost conscious only. In 1982 Cadillac introduced a new aluminum-block 249-cubic-inch 4.1-liter HT series V8 engine to replace the 368 in³ V8-6-4. That engine featured a closed-loop digital fuel injection system, free-standing cast-iron cylinders within a cast-aluminum block, and was coupled with a 4-speed automatic-overdrive transmission.

      The 4.1 liter V8 was underpowered as fitted to post-1981 models; it was prone to the block becoming porous and coolant mixing with the oil, resulting in early engine failure. Other engine options for 1982 included the Buick V6 or Oldsmobile’s diesel V8.

      So, the 4.1L was available as both a V6 and a V8. Confusing, I know, but it is how it was.

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      • ags290

        Thanks Mike!

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    • ags290

      The first 4.1 was a V-6. The HT4100 aluminum block came out later and was so bad that we had to add ultraviolet dye to the bulk oil at the dealership just to be able to find all of the porosity leaks.

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  8. Stephen Dycha

    I had the 4.1. Not as underpowered as I thought. Not as fast as my current Viper. Too funny. It was a clean southern car.it was a v6 btw.

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  9. Stephen Dycha

    I had the 4.1. Not as underpowered as I thought. Not as fast as my current Viper. Too funny. It was a clean southern car. It was a v6.

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    • Bingo

      Yep. We got it the first time…you have a viper.

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      • Mike H

        See, this is where the thumbs become handy.

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      • leiniedude

        Great illustration on the thumb Mike! Scrolling down, I thought race track until I got the big picture. As far as Stephens double post. And I have seen them here before. Maybe his computer is like mine as it takes some time to load after clicking the post icon. Always want to click it again to get it going. My other problem is I don’t have a Viper.

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      • Mike H

        I liked your response back there; perhaps a little tongue-in-cheek about the Viper ownership. I had a good laugh over here about that and I felt it deserved a “Thumbs Up”.

        Can’t figure out how to get a good emoji thumb on the computer. . . Phone works better for that, I suppose.

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  10. Bingo

    I have a question for you Jesse:

    You refer to the radio as a “head unit”. Isn’t this factory radio a self contained system? Maybe I don’t know what a head unit is but my simple mind thinks of it as part of a multi piece system. Am I wrong? A head unit implies “one of many in a system”.

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  11. Rustytech

    Head unit usually means the removable head on an aftermarket radio. I don’t think they existed in 1980. This is a very nice looking car, but if it is the 4100, here is your prime candidate for the LT1 conversions!

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    • Mike H

      I’d agree with that. In 1988 I was thrilled to have one of the first “pull-out” car stereos. . . Push a little button, lift the handle, and take the radio right out of the receiver sleeve in the dashboard.

      It seemed like a great idea at the time, but ultimately was a pain having to carry around a reasonably delicate (3) pound package everywhere you went.

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  12. Ellis

    My mother’s late husband bought one new for his late wife. My mother drove it for a couple of years, lots of electrical problems caused from non use.
    Neat and comfortable ride. Just too many issues with it from limited use.

    Dealer bills were just too high. Sold it a couple of years later.

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    • Kevin Wernick

      Electrical issues aren’t caused by non use

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      • Ellis

        That’s what she was told by the dealer

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  13. Car Guy

    This car really needs the optional Cadillac wire wheels and Vogue tires…………….

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    • Scott Lykins

      I’ve got a set of oem wire wheels for it. They’re just too nice to keep on the car.

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  14. CJay

    In 1981 you could get a 4.1 V6 engine (and get a $150 discount off of the price for doing it) or in the fall of 1981 get the 4.1 V8 engine (know as the 4100)

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  15. Thad

    Swap in a 472 or 500.

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  16. AMCSTEVE

    5 grand tops

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  17. Jubjub

    Hey, that looks like an 8-Track to me!

    Those weren’t Vogues, they were Uniroyal Royal Seals!

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  18. Jubjub

    @Mike H: I looked all over for an era correct stereo for the Barn Finds TVR. Finally scored an decent looking Coustic pull out for like $15 bucks at a U-Pick. Kind of a knock off Kenwood or Alpine but looks and feels just as good and as a bonus the deck still works.

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    • Snuffy

      Looks similar to a Blaupunkt(?) of Audi 5000 vintage.

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  19. George

    I had a 2 year-old used 1981 Cadillac with the 4-6-8. I had good luck with mine. I tried to keep in on 4 cylinders which was not easy on the freeway if you used the cruise control because it would shift irradically between 4 and 6 when the road rose ever so slightly, which was quite maddening. Using the gas pedal, it was possible to go up grades with only 4 pistons getting the fuel.by gently stepping down on the pedal. It was not easy but a gentle foot kept the car in 4 mode. Keeping it in 4th would result in 22-23 mpg on the freeway and between 16-18 straight tow which was pretty good for that vintage. I had it two +/- years putting on 20K. The reason I sold it was I tried to by cars wholesale and keep them only as long as the retail was around what I had paid, so I could dump them and essentially have the car for free, or lose very little. I had a 83 Ford Turbo Coupe I drove for 3 years, selling it for $200 less than I had paid–a cheap way to own a fairly new car. With the stratospheric prices for new cars, that cannot be done in this day and age. Despite my good luck with my 1981 Cadillac I would agree that the 4-6-8 motor was not a calming device

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