Bring The Neighborhood: 1969 Mercury Colony Park

A few weeks ago we featured a Country Squire wagon that surprised a few commenters when bidding topped $11K. We were all surprised though when it ultimately sold for $15,000. Well, here is something more reasonably priced, although needing some work. It is a 1969 Mercury Colony Park 10-passenger station wagon and there are few other classic cruisers that can haul the whole colony for less.

This brochure says it all, “Mercury Marquis Colony Park: If Lincoln Continental made a station wagon, this would be it.”

The wagon is equipped with the 2-barrel version of the 429 V-8 and the typical three-speed Cruise-O-Matic automatic transmission. It has spent the last four years in California after the seller, who is an automotive journalist, drove it from Arkansas to New Jersey, then on to Florida, for a road-trip feature for the UK publication, Classic American. From Florida, it was shipped to California, where it has basically sat. He did replace one of the exhaust manifolds when he got the car back to California at a cost of $1,100 (the repair shop broke off a stud and charged to fix their mistake).

The interior, other than being dusty, is in remarkably good shape, testimony to the durability of the vinyl used in these Nixon-era land yachts. The only flaw that should be repaired is the crack in the crash pad. It is fully equipped including power windows and 6-way power seats.

The seats fold flat and out back you will find Ford’s innovative dual facing rear seats. This feature allowed the driver to transport the entire starting line up of a Little League team. The tailgate can open as a door with the window up or down and also drops down as a conventional tailgate, a strong selling point of full-size Ford and Mercury station wagon when new.

The car is operable and even the motorized headlights still work. The car is also claimed to be straight and virtually rust-free. As the photos show, the paint and vinyl “DiNoc” wood could use some refreshing. You could replace the stickers, but we would probably just polish it up and drive.

Many experts feel that full-size American station wagons are on the rise in collector car circles given that they resonate so well with baby boomers and are still affordable. Also, as they share their mechanical parts and many body panels with similar sedans and hardtops, they remain relativity easy to restore.

This 125,524-mile 1969 Mercury Colony Park station wagon can be yours for $5,500 or best offer. At that price, you get a car that is almost as long as a RV and the seller will even install a new set of tires (three are currently flat from sitting in storage). The seller states that if you would rather install your own, the price would drop to $5,200. If you are interested, email us for the seller’s contact information.

Comments

  1. T.Brewer

    This is such a cool old car you see so many ragtops and 2 door but not alot of old wagons like this…………….

  2. Anonymous

    thats the ugliest car ever built

  3. Terry

    I have seen so many of these old wagons put through the demolition derby, these wagons are tough.

  4. Horse Radish

    Interest is picking up on American station wagons.
    I sold my ’64 Merc Colony Park to an English fellow and he’s fixing it on visits to relatives in Arizona. Once it’s done he’ll ship it ‘home’.
    He had the right nose for ‘em , I let it go for $2500, but nobody else stepped up to the plate…..

  5. Rick Rothermel

    Door panel shot indicates crank windows, not power.
    Neat car, but they were worthless on the used car market by the mid-’70s.
    The only thing this car does for me is make me wish I’d kept my ’69 Mark III…

  6. Bob

    Had an 84 Grand Marquis wagon.

    I still think those tailgates that can either hinge from the bottom or the side are an engineering miracle.

    It was a great car on long trips.

  7. Justin in Indy

    I have a 66 CP. Amazing how different it is in almost every possible way from this car. Mine runs and drives and is a cool 20 footer and I wouldnt think it could fetch that kind of coin. I wish him the best. if his does, It gives me hope :D

  8. hearsetrax

    Alas …. the art that is a nice big family station wagon is a dieing art ……. and this is the perfect exsample of why we need to turn back the hands of time

  9. Jim

    Though a Ford LTD Country Squire was used for the “Wagon Queen Family Truckster” in National Lampoon’s “Vacation,” this may well have been the inspiration for it!

  10. Dan

    I’d like to know the name of the repair shop. I drove my brother 62 Colony Park wagon from Florida to Rhode Island many many moons ago. It seemed huge.

  11. J. Pickett

    Nice, but I found a 67 colony park and a 73 Ford Country Sedan for less on cragslist. The Country sedan was a 54k car for 5000.00

  12. BradL

    The dual facing rear seats are an interesting idea but is there really room for four sets of legs? I have three siblings and am very well versed in “whose feet are in whose space”. Ahh, sibling rivalry. Those were the days. ;)

  13. Dan

    four kids up to teenagers can fit in those seats, they are not that bad.

  14. Marc Purello

    I would want a 4-barrel on the 429. Very good set-up for nine passengers, not to mention what you could/can transport with the seats folded down.

    One negative: I think I know now where National Lampoon got the idea for the Wagon Queen Family Truckster, god was that an awful thing to look at!

  15. jim

    I just don’t get the fascination with these things. They aren’t the ugliest cars ever built (Pontiac Aztec and various AMC models come to mind as worse) but they’re darn close to it.

  16. mark

    Not much of a Mercury/Ford guy, but I would drive it!! Better that all those newer S.U.V.s and vans for sure!!

  17. Bob Smith

    Would make an awesome and unusual hotrod, with that huge V-8 through a 4bbl or 6pack on it!

  18. Jim

    My mother used to own a ’69 Mercury Marquis sedan. It was aqua-green with a black vinyl roof and a black vinyl interior. For a luxury car, it still lacked power windows, power seats, power mirrors and cruise control. It was equipped with a weak mono AM radio. The a/c was quite effective, even in the Louisana heat and humidity. It was powerfu, but 13 – 14 mpg was typical. It was sold at a loss during the oil embargo of ’73/’74. It is long gone I would assume.

  19. Karo

    This is an eight-passenger wagon, not 10. The rear seats were designed for two passengers, not four. Note the contour of the bottom cushions: the deeper part is where your butt goes, the narrower part is to make room for your legs.

  20. Jim Hollis

    Kinda like the Wagon Queen Family Truckster! Boat of a car, but still pretty cool.

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