Muscle Wagon: 1967 Ford Country Sedan

The muscle car was born when someone dropped a big block into a midsize body. So, what do you get when you take a stripper station wagon and option it with a big block? Well, the combination may not be as potent, but this muscle wagon is a lot more functional. You can take the whole family to drag strip and still have room to pick up a couple sheets of plywood on the way home! This big bruiser is located in Englewood, Colorado and is listed here on craigslist for $5,500.

The Country Sedan was a little less extravagant than the Country Squire, but that makes it the perfect place to start if you want an unassuming muscle machine. There’s a bench seat, column shift, and not much else inside. Some new vinyl would really clean things up in here or you could stick with the budget Serape look.

Who cares what’s inside when you have one of these under the hood? That’s Ford’s famous 390 FE big block. I’m guessing it has the more efficient two-barrel carb setup on top, but I bet a new four-barrel and intake could really liven things up! It shouldn’t be hard to squeeze 300 horses out of that thing without much effort

Dog dish hubcaps complete our muscle wagon motive. As with¬† sleepers of old, the only giveaway that there might be something going on here is the 390 badge on the fender. This thing isn’t perfect, but I can see a lot of potential here. Heck, if it were closer, I’d be tempted myself. How about you?

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Comments

  1. Fred W.

    I get a kick out of the “muscle wagon” label given to cars that were optioned that way often for one purpose- trailer towing. In this case, though, with a stick shift- maybe they did want to do some street racing.

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    • Jesse Jesse Staff

      Fred, torque is your friend. Whether you are towing… or drag racing!

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    • Todd Zuercher

      It’s an automatic.

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      • Chris In Australia

        Seconded. Auto quadrant on the column. A 390 2bbl is hardly going to set the world afire. Not much of a sleeper.

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    • Jesse Jesse Staff

      It’s listed as a manual. Perhaps they will chime in and clear that up.

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      • Todd Zuercher

        The ad says “390 automatic”. I looked and looked and couldn’t find mention of a manual tranny – what am I missing?

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      • z28th1s

        The automatic shift indicator is clearly visible on top of the steering column. Definitely not a manual shift car. The paint job looks pretty rough from some of the pictures.

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      • Jesse Jesse Staff

        Sorry for the confusion. Automatic it is.

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      • Dovi65

        I only see two pedals; so either I need better glasses, or it’s an automatic.

        I had a 67 Country Sedan. Mine had a 289, but still had more than enough oomph to keep pace with modern traffic. It was $400 well spent!

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      • Foxxy

        just look at the pedals in the pic, that will clear it up.

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  2. GaryC Member

    Saw a mid 60’s Chevy wagon at a friends shop here in OKC. I don’t remember what engine my friend said it had but it was along the lines of an LS with a super charger. Said it was pushing 500 h.p.
    Had dog dishes on stock rims and even had a little rust in the rockers.
    Ultimate sleeper.

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  3. WLB

    You have to shift it from “P” to “D”.

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  4. danel wright

    We had a ford f250 with the 390. It made many cross country trips with a cab over camper. Although not a fire breather it handled the job well.

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  5. Ray

    I had one of these back in 1977. That 390 was quite an engine I was 17 years old and paid $300 for it. Had some fun in that car.

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    • Snotty

      I too had one around that same time period for the same amount of $. It was white, with the oft used 390/C-6 combo,being a 17 yr. old then I put that poor car through hell on vacant stretches of blacktop,and couldn’t kill it,the fella’s in school called me the “wagonmaster”as I tortured the car and we chugged beer.

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  6. Mike

    Two pedals on the floor, gentlemen, two not three.
    Interesting attempt to widen the search for buyers….
    First, a Galaxy isn’t an intermediate, it’s a full size (heavy), and second a 390 is no particular powerhouse – just a good old reliable V8.
    Not any “muscle wagen” by any means – only a full size wagon with a V8, typical in its day.
    Still enjoyable just the same.

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    • Jesse Jesse Staff

      I never said it was an intermediate or an automatic.

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  7. JW

    I always liked the stacked headlight cars from Ford & Pontiac and the 390 would do the job for cruising. At our local 1/8 mile track we tailgate rather than sit in the stands and this would fit nicely.

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  8. KeithK

    I really don’t understand all the automatic haters out there. I’m no genius but I personally ran a jeep cj-7 transplanted with a sbc 400 and a th350 auto at the strip every Friday in my youth. I built the engine and trans as a teen and installed some but not all of the trick doodads B&M had to offer. It shifted like a sledge hammer when using the ratchet regularly twisting axles , destroying u-joints and turning consistent 14s . In D it just bumped along allowing me to use my free hand for other activities involving a certain someone. Don’t worry Janet Kowalski,I won’t mention your name.

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    • Jeffro

      Janet is going to kick your azz. Lol

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  9. CapNemo

    Here’s mine under construction. Just a beer runner.

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    • CapNemo

      Ok

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      • CapNemo

        Well so much for pictures. Sorry.

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  10. M/K

    F%&k 4 barrel carbs on an otherwise stock 390, a 500cfm Holley 2 barrel carb will wake a 390 right up. Why? Can’t say but that’s been my experience, that’s what all the old fordophiles say also. Listen to the grey beards an useful knowledge will pour out.

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    • ninja3000

      Amen to the 390 fans, and I’ve also said it before, the 390 is a great base. My father in law bored out a mid-’60s 390 to 406, dropped a 4-barrel Holley on top, and stuck in my ’77 F-150 (with a C6). Smoked the tires!

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  11. Rustytech

    With the 390 it depended on how it was set up, and the weight of the car. I had a 390 2 bbl 4speed ( w/granny gear) in a 1968 F250, it was smooth and powerfull, but no barn burner. Had the same engine with a 4bbl in a 1966 Fairlane with C6 automatic and it would burn the tires off if you stayed on it, and could challenge an SS 396 on equal terms. Neither had been altered from stock. Great engine!

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  12. JW

    Wasn’t Steve Mcqueen’s Mustang equipped with a 390 in Bullit when he was keeping pace with the 440 Charger ???

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  13. Car Guy

    My father bought a beautiful new 390 4bbl Galaxie fastback coupe in 67. My mother could not leave a stop sign without squealing the tires. It really use to make her upset. Motor ran great but the rest of the car was junk. In the first six months of ownership, the waterpump failed in the middle of New Mexico. Then the brakes failed as my mother was driving it to the store with me in the car. Luckily she did not hit anyone. Finally the transmission started dumping it’s guts. My father traded it on a 68 455 Toronado. Never had a problem with that car…………

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  14. guggie

    Had 73 F250 390 auto great truck , hauled an 11ft camper and a Bass boat all over , never let me down .

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  15. CJ

    Great looking ride, looks to be in decent shape. Give it some TLC, wash, wax, buff, change the fluids, seat covers, etc. and go!

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  16. G 1

    There used to be millions of these things around.

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  17. Clint

    I was at Carlisle All Ford Nationals a few years ago and they had a 67 Squire that had a 428 (not a CJ or SCJ) with a 4 speed. It was one of one built. Cool car.

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    • Pete in PA

      A few years back there was a similar Mopar product for sale on the web. Out of Salt Lake City IIRC. It was a 66 Fury III wagon equipped with the 440 and the A833 4-speed floor-shifted transmission. Also power front disc brakes, dual exhaust, and a trailer hitch. White with a blue interior. Definitely a purpose-built one of one as well.

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    • Ralph Terhune

      That was Adrian Clements’ car. He has since sold the car. Very nice fellow and very knowledgeable on the ’67 full size Fords. I have several ’67 Fords myself. Love ’em!

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      • z28th1s

        I met Adrian in 2001 after I bought a ’67 Galaxie 500 2 door fastback. He is the ‘keeper’ of the ’67 Ford Full Size Registry.

        My old car was black with a red bench seat. It had the 390-4V and a 4 speed trans. It also had just 42,000 original miles on it. According to the Marti Report that I got for it there were just 840 of the 390-4V with 4 speed combos built out of the over 197,000 2 door fastbacks that year.

        I should have kept that car! I sold it to a friend of mine and then he sold it to someone up north. I saw it a few years later at the All-Ford Nationals in Carlisle, PA.

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  18. Pete in PA

    I worked at a small junkyard in SE PA back in the late 70s/early 80s and this car reminds of one we had in the yard that I regret not saving. It was a 67 County Squire that was really unique. A turquoise non-metallic paint with the woodgrain sides, of course, and a gold vinyl interior. It was loaded with the 390, power steering, disc brakes, power windows, power bench seat, A/C, cruise control, tinted glass, and probably a few more options I can’t remember. It wasn’t a wreck, was complete, and wasn’t trashed. It probably had a mechanical problem that made it not worth fixing at the time. It really made an impression on me because very few of the cars we got in had options like power windows, A/C, or disc brakes. The frugal local population didn’t spend the money for stuff like that so this car stood out. The paint color alone was unusual. Wish I had a time machine to save that one! (And the 64 1/2 Mustang coupe VIN 100255 that was built on the very first day of production.)

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  19. RS

    Oh, the cars I’ve had and what I paid for them, what I sold them for, and what they would be worth now. 25 years ago I bought a 1970 LTD Squire wagon, 429 2 barrel – not as good as a 4v but it would easily tear the tires anytime – and air conditioning. The car had spent its life in TX and CA and you could get underneath it with a wrench and unbolt things that had been bolted together at the factory. The threads were CLEAN, no rust. I paid $290 for it and sold it for less than that some time later after driving it a year.
    If I could buy back that $50K (or more) worth of cars that I sold for $1000 or less total…

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