Musical Truck! 1926 Ford Model T Roadster Pickup

This 1926 Ford Model T Roadster Pick-up is one of approximately 15 million Model Ts produced between 1908 – 1927. With possible local business provenance, this Model T is available here on craigslist in Denver Colorado for $7,000. Special thanks to Ikey Heyman for finding this Model T.

Model T development began in 1907 and was preceded by eight previous car models. These prior models allowed Henry Ford to develop various automotive features that would provide the foundation for the Model T. Ford’s Model T Development Team consisted of Chief Engineer Childe H. Willis, Machinist C.J. Smith, and draftsman Joseph Galamb. The first Model T was released in 1908 and sold for $850. It would continue to remain in production until 1927. It was succeeded by the Model A in 1928.

This model on offer is referred to as an RPU; Roadster Pick-up. The seller doesn’t mention the condition of the body only noting that some parts are missing or have been previously scavenged. Therefore, the body condition will need to be determined from the pictures or in-person inspection. This RPU shows a well-worn, surface rusted body with the scrapes and dents expected of an un-restored vehicle of this age. It appeals to be all original “Henry Steel” which is often a marketing point for these cars. Rust though is not apparent in the pictures but pay close attention to the lower sections of the cowls and the doors. Note the wood spoked wheels.

This Model T originally came with a 177ci 4 cylinder that generated 20hp and had a top speed of 40-45 mph. The engine was made from Vanadium alloy steel and had a removable cylinder head. Hot rodders refer to this motor as a “Banger”. The seller notes that the motor turns and holds water but has not tried to start it. The transmission and instrumentation look undisturbed. There is no driver’s seat and the flooring is missing. The floors are wood and easily replaceable and the front seat should be able to be sourced. The aftermarket is very strong for these cars. The seller also mentions that title paperwork is in progress.

This RPU shows stenciling suggesting that it was a work truck for a local business. The seller has researched this and notes that this music company was in business until 1931. The stenciling looks original in the photos provided. The provenance could make this an interesting restoration. However, it’s highly likely that with a little effort, you could also get this Model T running in its current condition. So here is the question, do you rod it, restore it, or run it as is?

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Comments

  1. bobhess bobhess Member

    No reason to cut up a complete vehicle. Want a T Bucket go buy a frame and fiberglass body and go from there. This guy needs to be in a museum somewhere.

    Like 30
  2. David Taylor

    AT MOST – – – complete restoration so that it looks like it did when new back in the day. AT LEAST – – – display in museum “AS IS”.

    Like 8
  3. lbpa18

    There just arent that many vehicles of that vintage with that history. The stenciling is not stenciling. It is hand painted by someone who had done dozens of these kinds of things on store windows, signs, and other vehicles. Find that skill today, t’aint there. This was skillfully accomplished and should be preserved. Whether it becomes a hot rod or a mechanically refurbished original, I hope it ends up back on the road. Save it.

    Like 8
    • Paul R.

      I do believe there are still folks around with sign painting skills.
      One venue where this is still prevalent is in boating, painting the name and port of registry on the stern.

      Like 2
  4. F.J. Carpenter

    That is Not a stencil, it was done by a sign painter. Art work of this kind is getting to be rare with all the vinyl graphics of today. Save the graphics, get it driveable and enjoy!

    Like 3
  5. jerry hw brentnell

    say what you want this thing is not worth 7 grand, great lawn ornament, drive it anywhere? yea right ! most people don’t have a clue how to use that 3 pedal transmission stick back it the barn and get something for 7 grand you can drive and enjoy!

    Like 1
    • M.C.S.

      Model T transmissions are not at all difficult to learn. All it takes is a simple “Google” search.

      And yes, this truck could very well be driven again, much as it sits.

      Like 3
  6. Steve RM

    Replace what’s missing and get it on the road. Then it’s worth $7,000.

    Like 3
  7. Courtney

    Actually my brother had just a cab from a1928 roadster pickup he sold it alone for 3000.00 to a guy who needed one. Any model t roadster seat will work. You can still get aftermarket tops too wood for the floor was yellow pine I believe. I see some past welding on the truck but it was done long ago when gas was the only thing available. If the motor turns it can be made to run. My grandfather rebuilt one in their kitchen one. Boy was my grandma pissed at him for that. Everything will have to be taken apart and cleaned in the drivetrain . Brakes will have to be reshoed. Good winter project.

    Like 5
  8. DuesenbergDino

    Instead of buying rusted out, overpriced “1 of” mustangs or mopars you can buy this. $7k is not much considering all that this offers. Yeah they made lots of them back in the day but most are chopped up and hot rodded. About as stock as you’ll find and we’ll worth the time and money to get it back on the road.

    Like 8

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