327 Equipped: 1955 Chevrolet Bel Air Nomad

Detroit was firing on all eight cylinders for the 1955 model year. Especially at Chevrolet, where the popular, all-new ’55 models were breaking sales records. 1,775,952 total Chevys were produced, a whopping 54% increase over 1954, and its top-of-the-line Bel Air series broke sales records as well. Nearly 801,000 Bel Airs were purchased (compared to 486,240 in 1954), but the lowest Bel Air production model came in the form of the Nomad, a cool-looking new 2-door luxury sports wagon. Chevrolet’s bread-and-butter buyers weren’t ready for this unique blend of sportiness, luxury, and utility, and only 8,530 were sold out of the 166,486 station wagons produced. These great looking sports wagons have been collectable for decades and don’t come with a cheap price tag. Here’s a good-looking “upgraded” Nomad that’s now sporting a 327-cubic inch V8 under the hood along with some other non-original items. You can find it in Cypress, Texas where it’s being offered as an auction here on eBay. As I’m writing this, 25 bids have been submitted with the top bid currently sitting at $45,100.

The seller doesn’t give us any history or when this Nomad was restored to its current condition. You can’t get more mid-50’s than the color turquoise and its current paint scheme (I believe it’s Regal Turquoise and India Ivory) looks great as does the chrome, glass, and trim (especially the cool vertical trim pieces on the tail gate). Except for the tires and the 15″ American Racing mag wheels, this Nomad looks very stock on the outside.

The seller describes the interior as being “meticulously coordinated,” and it’s stunning, as all top-of-the-line Bel Air interiors were back in 1955. It’s a beautiful use of two tones, chrome, and stainless to match the turquoise and ivory exterior, and I’ve always dug the waffle-patterned seats and door panels. And check out all the dazzling shiny stuff inside, especially the flashy polished stainless headliner bows. No photos are included of the Nomad’s cargo area, but one would assume it’s clean and near perfect as well. Along with the non-original steering wheel, four-on-the-floor Hurst shifter, and under dash gauges, the seller shares that the Nomad has  “power steering, front disc brakes, and an aftermarket digital stereo.”

Strangely, there were no posted photos of the Nomad’s current powerplant, a Chevy 327-cubic inch V8, that at some time and for some reason replaced the original 265-cubic inch V8. Other upgrades listed by the seller are “an Edelbrock intake manifold and four-barrel carburetor, an MSD ignition coil, a Mallory distributor, and an efficient aluminum radiator.” In their beautifully illustrated ’55 sales brochure, Chevrolet described their new Nomad as “The peak of style and grace, its swept-forward windows, grooved top and softly sloping back lend true sportsman’s flair to the luxurious Nomad.” I’ve always loved the Tri-Five Nomads with the first year ’55 as my favorite. What do you think of this impressive turquoise and ivory head turner?

Comments

  1. Avatar photo Stan

    Cool 😎 Nomad. 327 and 4sp 👍 ⛱️

    Like 19
    • Avatar photo Rw

      Not one under hood or under car pic ???

      Like 12
  2. Avatar photo Oldschoolmuscle

    Cars back then had more style and a lot of attention to detail went into them. Today’s trash are just massed produced no pizzaz all look the same. Stupidest thing today is the infotainment screens biggest driving distraction in my book,,Ill keep mine old school!!!

    Like 37
  3. Avatar photo Fox owner

    Wow, just wow. Beautiful resto and attention to detail. I’d be afraid to take this one out anywhere.

    Like 11
  4. Avatar photo Claudio

    A nice looker , that dangling piece of plastic around the steering column looks like sloppy finish work to me !
    The non engine and underpinning pictures are an instant flag to me
    And
    Having driven one of these , they ride like dumptrucks in stock form and could not suit my driving technique but the looks are unbeatable !
    YOLO

    Like 4
    • Avatar photo Gator Rodder

      I’m 76 years old. I had a ‘55 wagon 265. V8 Bel Air and it drove great…..not like a dump truck. I wish I still had it. I also had a ‘57 Bel Air. Both were great cars in their own right. Suspension upgrades and disc brakes add to the quality of the ride. It looks like an Ididit aftermarket column which is a great steering column. Lots of good stuff in that car.

      Like 1
      • Avatar photo Paul Murawski

        Dad bought Mom a red 57 Chevy way back. For a 100.00. Just a 6 cyl power glide but. Ya know. I got old and I got Grandkids that like my old school stuff. Spring is coming so I gotta get
        wrenching , the 64 needs a flywheel 400ci w 350 trans. Course I’ll do rear freeze plugs while I am in there. Hmm Get er up so we can get down the road.

        Like 0
  5. Avatar photo Nomader 55

    This is not turquoise. Closer to cashmere blue, also a 1955 color. I’ve collected Nomads for 60 years and am familiar with them. I’d be a potential buyer if I could see underside and under hood. Dave 309 256 2656

    Like 6
  6. Avatar photo RexFox Member

    This to me is the perfect ‘55! I love the color, the 327 (I too would like to see it though), the front disc brakes, the wheels, and especially the 4 speed.

    Like 2
  7. Avatar photo Steve Mehl

    Sensational!
    However, the racing wheels take away from the stock look. I would put stock wheels back on. 1955 Nomad might just be the best looking wagon ever made. Locally, in the Baltimore area we have an auto repair shop that for years has a 1957 Nomad wagon sitting outside. Really sad to see something that valuable being treated like a piece of trash.

    Like 5
  8. Avatar photo bobhess Member

    Beautiful car.

    Like 5
  9. Avatar photo 427Turbojet Member

    My first car was a 55 Delray in cashmere blue – circa 1972. I actively looked for a 55 Nomad, hopefully cashmere blue to match. I found this Nomad in 1975, not cashmere blue but something I could build on. My Delray was stolen and rolled in 1979, bought it back from the insurance co. and stripped it to use all the parts in the Nomad. ’65 283, 3 speed overdrive, P case 4.11 posi, etc. Still drive the Nomad now.
    Still like the look of a white/blue 55 Nomad. Could easily live with this one, my tastes would be to lower it 3 – 4 inches, lose the white letters and get rid of the steering wheel, back to original or as in my Nomad a 58 – 60 Impala wheel. Clean up some of the loose details and drive the wheels off it!

    Like 6
  10. Avatar photo John Jasper

    I would have liked to seen Chevy do an El Camino out of this body style.

    Like 1
  11. Avatar photo Alan

    I’ll just bet that their response will be “we’re going to restore it eventually ” which usually results in the car rotting away to nothing.

    Like 0
  12. Avatar photo Joe Haska

    Something about this car seems off. No pictures of engine or undercarriage. The price is reasonable for a Nomad. I would have to see it in person.

    Like 0
  13. Avatar photo Billy

    Hood hinges must be broken. This one doesn’t make sense. Beautimus 55 Nomad like this that isn’t slammed to the asphalt and no underwear photos.

    Maybe it’s just a private car show?

    Like 1
  14. Avatar photo Aussie Dave Member

    Forgive me, I’m an Aussie, and my introduction to the nomad was via a plastic model I built as a kid. I thought all nomads had the duel indents in the bonnet with crome?
    Just need to be educated, as this is the first nomad I’ve seen without.

    Like 0
  15. Avatar photo Nomader 55

    Aussie Dave. All 1957 chevies had duel indents with chrome wings (shark fins) in the hood (bonnet) including the Nomad. 55 and 56 hoods were smooth all models. Our National Nomad club (CNA chevrolet nomad club) has several Aussie members. Some of them come to the states to our convention each year. We also have a web page if you’re interested. Also Dave

    Like 1
  16. Avatar photo Mike

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