BF AUCTION: 1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Spider

Josh MortensenBy Josh Mortensen

UPDATE: There were a few issues near the end so we have extended the auction by 24 hours.

Mark A describes his Alfa Romeo as a “classic sexy roadster” and we’d have to agree! This is one incredibly beautiful machine and it is in pristine condition! It’s already been fully restored to a high level and just needs a good home. It’s one of 3,706 Giulia 1600 Spiders built and will likely continue to appreciate in value. So, if you’ve been looking for an Alfa Spider to add to your collection, be sure to bid!

Photos really don’t do these cars justice. Having seen several in person, we can attest to what a great job Pininfarina did with the design. The Spider is actually based on the Giulia sedan, but you would never guess it by looking at those curves. The 1600 inline-four offers up 105 horsepower, which might not seem like a lot by today’s standards, but that was actually pretty impressive for a motor this size in 1963. With that in mind, it’s easy to understand why these have become so collectible.

The engine and drivetrain are said to be in excellent condition. It has recently had a fresh 2-barrel downdraft carb installed and was tuned up to factory specs. A pair of Weber DCOE 40 carbs would liven things up a bit, but this is the kind of car you want to keep as close to original spec as possible. And with a 0 to 60 time under 10 seconds and a top speed of 107 mph, you really don’t need more power to enjoy it. It really is impressive that Alfa was able to squeeze that much performance out of a little 1.6 liter engine.

The interior looks to be in nice shape. It appears to have been restored with the rest of the car and is ready for you to jump in and go. The odometer is currently showing 10,210 miles, but Mark notes that it’s 110,210 miles, which is believed to be accurate. It isn’t uncommon to find a ’60s Ferrari with 50k or fewer miles, Alfas on the other hand tend to be driven by their owners. Clearly someone has enjoyed this car, but the mileage shouldn’t be an issue considering that it has been fully restored and is still in great shape.

To round out the restoration, all the chrome was removed and replated. A brand new convertible top was also installed and should keep you and the lovely interior protected from the elements. We doubt the next owner will take it out on stormy days, but it’s nice to know if you do happen to get caught in a storm you have some type of protection.

Mark’s Alfa was imported from Japan and has been in his care ever since. He’s had it for a little while and enjoys it, but there is a different car he wants more, so this one has to go. We can’t imagine what he could want more than this beautiful little Alfa, but it must be something interesting. So let’s find a good home for this Italian and hopefully he lets us in on what the other car is!

Our thanks to Mark for asking us to help him find a home for his Giulia. If you have any questions for Mark, be sure to leave them in the comments below. You can also view more detailed photos of it here on Dropbox. If you have a classic that you are thinking about selling please consider auctioning it off right here on Barn Finds!

Location: San Francisco, California
Mileage: 110,000
Title Status: Clean

[wpauction id=”20″ /]

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Comments

  1. Klharper

    I have one of these and they are wonderful cars. My wife sees what they are going go and ask if we should sell it. After I’m dead is my reply.

    I also have a 750 Giulietta Veloce in the garage getting a little work. It is a very nice car and close to a #2 but it has never been restored. The owner is contemplating selling it. Price in the 120 to 150k range.
    K

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    • Jharrill

      This part of the country seems to be a hot-bed for Giuliettas/Giulias.

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  2. Klharper

    Oh photos of two, and the one on the trailer is the one I was speaking of. Though the racer may also be for sale.

    2+
  3. hubrick Member

    Nice looking car. Some of the pictures even look like paintings instead of pictures – nice effect. When was the restoration done, what was done, are there receipts, and how many miles have been driven since then? Any rust repairs? When was it imported from Japan? Has it been converted from RHD?

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    • BRAKESERVO

      Actually, I was thinking the photos looks a little “too enhanced” for me to have any sort of confidence in bidding on this car. A seller who wishes to do well would be well advised to make sure the car actually looks better in person than it does in the photos, and I fear that in this case, the reverse might be true. As far as being imported from Japan, many Japanese prefer the LHD versions as it is assumed to give a car more prestige there! Unlike here where so many people go running and screaming the other way when they see something RHD. By the way, all my fun cars are RHD as I prefer them that way here! And whenever I hear someone whining “Oh gee, I could never drive that” I reply that maybe they shouldn’t drive LHD either as it’s virtually the same, all you have to do is think a little different sometimes!

      1+
  4. Howard A Member

    Man, some people got nerve, bidding a couple hundred bucks. ( I’m well aware auctions have to start somewhere) The value of these has gone into the stratosphere, and for good reason. It’s a rare and incredible car,,,,and my brother had one just like this ( only green) in the early 70’s( that he bought for $500 bucks, and the guy threw in a very tired TR4 that we sold for $200) and I feel very privileged that I got to drive one. It was an exhilarating experience. Free winding engine ( unmistakable sound), 5 speed ( that ground badly) and huge brakes, it is a cool car. #3 spark plug was stripped and blew out, so we took it apart, and must have had the cams off a tooth, because it never ran the same after that. If you think this is just another 2 seat roadster, you never drove an Alfa.

    3+
  5. Burns Rafferty

    Fond memories of these. My father bought a ’57, back in 1961 in Baltimore. We had a lot of fun with that car. He finally had to sell it because getting parts was almost impossible back then; no one had even heard of Alfa Romeo in Baltimore back then.
    Sure wish I had that car now!

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  6. Jay Call

    Bought a ’65 Veloce almost identical to this one, back in ’69, when I was stationed in Germany — paid $1,500.00 for it. A great car, though I had problems with a blown rear main seal, blown head gasket, and a couple of other little problems. The roof had a tear in it and while I was waiting for a new one to arrive, I would stick an umbrella through the hole in the evening, let it freeze to the top, and then drove it that way. Worked pretty well, but thank goodness I didn’t have to do that for long. Shipped it back to the U.S. after I was transferred for my first tour in Viet Nam. When I got back, I traded it for a brand new SAAB 99. What an idiot I was! The Veloce had the same engine, but twin Webers were standard — plus it had a larger finned aluminum, baffled oil sump. A very nice car, but you had to maintain it or it would go south on you.

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  7. Stuart

    I bought this exact car (year and model) for $115 at a farmer’s estate auction in Upstate NY with paper route money whenI was 13 years old. (1973) Thanks for the memories and all the coulda, shoulda, wouldas that go with them!!!

    1+
  8. Bruce Best

    I had a 1963 Giulietta and there are many unique features that need to be noted. Much of the front chrome is either stainless steel or brass that is chrome plated. The seats as you move them back they also go down so your eye position stays largely the same. This car is amazing for people with longer legs or are taller than average.

    The heaters is as close to worthless as you can get. Think butterfly pushing the heat of a candle. If you have the factory exhaust you have to look at the tach to see if the engine is running when in stop and go traffic. The weather sealing around the windows is good, the gas cap is hidden by the trunk lid.

    There are so many features that are high class, like the brass nuts for the manifolds so they do not rust on. The magnets in the oil pan to limit debris damage from contaminated oil. Things like that abound.

    Two truly bad features are rust and those nasty nylon gears that are on the wiper mechanics. Get a couple of extras I can assure you that you will need them sooner or later. I needed them twice in the 15 year time span I had mine. The second time there were spares in the glove box.

    One of the best things about a convertible is being as close as you can to nature. This is especially true on long trips. I am from the Kansas City area and I went to school at University of Idaho. There is a road between Missoula, Montana and Lewiston, Idaho called LOLO PASS. In my Giulietta I coasted as long as 45 miles without the engine even being on. Almost like a magic carpet.

    These are great cars even many of the parts like door handles and other trim end up on Ferraris and Maseratis for good reason, the work and are very well made. I very much miss mine but my sister married a man that was extremely tall and it was the only car he said fit him like it was made for him. (I felt the same way and I am of average height) and in a moment of weakness I sold it.

    It was sold again last year for a reported $95,000. Not bad for a car that I purchased when I was 16 for $300.00. My first car I purchased by myself. I guess like first girl friends you remember them forever.

    If I could this one would be MINE- read in evil villain type laughter.

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  9. Greg

    Mark, this is an absolutely beautiful car! My favorite Alpha’s.

    1+
  10. giorgitd

    Agree that this is a very cool car. But the posterized images complicate understanding of the condition of the vehicle. We need to see perspectives that are important, not artistic representations.

    3+
  11. Roy

    Could you please advise if this is a ‘matching numbers’ car?
    Some photos of the relevant numbers would be a great help with authenticating the vehicle.
    Also… Would you be able to assist with overseas shipping?

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  12. Bobror

    Can that be correct that there were only 3706 1600 Giulia Spiders built? There must have been more than that.

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  13. Chuck F 55chevy

    I remember seeing one of these in the 70s and thinking it was some kind of Karmann Ghia LOL.

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  14. Pete

    My Fiance was born in Milano and her daughters name is Giulia and she has red hair. That is as close as I am gonna get to having a car like this. LMAO

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  15. Mark

    It does not have matching numbers to my knowledge. It’s possible that it does but I can’t say yes for sure.

    And yes, I can assist in overseas shipping. It might take a few more days since I will have to find a different shipper, but not a problem

    0
  16. hubrick Member

    Hi Mark,
    Glad you are answering questions. Can you go back to the 18th and answer mine? Thanks

    0
  17. Marc

    Interested in bidding and been following the auction but with current information and photos I don’t feel well enough informed to take the risk to be honest. The photos are artistically shot but there are none of the underside/chassis and no detailed bodywork shots to be able to judge sufficiently without seeing it in person (not possible for me).
    Can you supply any information and/or photos about the bodywork, rust situation, underneath, etc please? I think the answers to Hubrick’s questions would be a good starting point. Many thanks.

    0
  18. Mark

    Answers to Hubrick’s questions

    When was the restoration done, what was done, are there receipts, and how many miles have been driven since then?

    Restoratioin was done about 2 years ago on chrome, engine and top. Paint and interior were done prior to our ownership

    Any rust repairs? No
    When was it imported from Japan? Approximate 2 – 2 ½ years ago
    Has it been converted from RHD? No – this is original spec

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  19. Mark

    Miles Driven: 500-1000. I only drive it locally. It has been stored in my garage since June 2016

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  20. Mark

    As for standard pictures. I can take some when I get home tonight, around 7 PM PDT. It will be hard to get underneath but I’ll try

    0
  21. hubrick Member

    Thanks, Mark. Appreciate the replies. Great car.

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  22. Mark

    It took awhile but I finally was able to download the pictures

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  23. Mark

    Another 1 from my iPhone

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  24. Mark

    I can only download 1 per post. Here is 1 from underneath the car. There is some rust on the exhaust pipe but it is in god shape

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  25. Mark

    And yes, I got new license plates that are more appropriate for this vehicle

    0
  26. Marc

    What just happened there? On the face of it Classe56 bid against himself 4 times, the final, winning bid exceeding the penultimate bid by $293,000/ What’s the real story here – destroy the auction? Will there be a re-run?

    0
  27. Roy

    What the heck is going on?!!

    Is this for real?

    0
  28. hubrick Member

    Obviously an erroneous bid. I would like to buy the car at $32,500.

    0
  29. Jesse Mortensen Jesse Mortensen Staff

    classe56 obviously added one too many zeros there right at the end so we are extending the auction another 24 hours so everyone can have a chance. Thanks guys!

    0
  30. Francisco

    I’ve never been to an auction where the high bidder could bid against himself, yet it’s being accepted here. Strange.

    0
    • Brakeservo

      I think it happens more often than you think, particularly in “live” auctions such as Barrett-Jackson where frequently the auctioneer is shouting out numbers that no real live bidder has entered. In a no reserve auction this is illegal but happens anyway. Most famous example I can think of is a Barrett-Jackson Las Vegas auction of a few years back for a Bugatti Veyron. It reached a point where the (perhaps lone) bidder was hammered as the high and winning bidder but he quickly realized he was only bidding against himself – there were not other real bidders. So he refused to pay for the car. Now, ol’ Craig Jackson certainly can’t admit that they were running up bogus bids for the bidder to bid against, so he announces the cockamamie story that “to protect the seller I will honor the high bid and buy the car.” But no, the reality was that there was no bona fide underbidder at that point to whom they could have sold the car too, even if they’d had to waive part of their commission so that the seller’s net would have been the same. So, to “save face” Jackson bought the car. No one was fooled.

      0
    • Jesse Mortensen Jesse Mortensen Staff

      You can raise your max bid on eBay even if you are already winning, but we don’t do proxy bidding here so it just raises the current bid. Does that make sense? There’s nothing shady going on. Everyone is just used to how eBay works.

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      • Francisco

        If the buyer raises his own bid three times, and the auction ends without another bidder challenging him, does the buyer get the item at his original bid? If not, I cannot see any advantage to outbidding yourself. In fact, it seems foolish. And, as they say: a fool and his money are soon parted.

        0
  31. hubrick Member

    Mark – any chance of my brother there in San Fran coming by to see the car tomorrow before the auction ends?

    0
  32. Mark

    yes, tell me what a good time is for him. I have some things to do in the early AM so sometime after 11 AM PDT is preferrable

    0
  33. hubrick Member

    we have the time zone issues going on here – i’m in central time, so 2 hours later. he’ll get up about 8 SF time, so I’ll let you know for sure after that. I’m thinking early to mid afternoon will work, so that works. Jesse sent me your email address, so I sent you one with my brother’s too

    0
  34. Hubrick Member

    What a difference a day makes. Several new bidders today. Congrats to all.

    0

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