Big Cat: 1958 Jaguar XK150 FHC

Jaguar has often been considered to be one of Britain’s greatest Sports car manufactures, but this title wasn’t bestowed to the company until the release of their XK series. Over a thirteen year period the company refined and developed the XK, starting with the XK120 and ending with the XK150. These cars have become very sought after and its getting hard to find solid unrestored examples. This 1958 Jaguar XK150 was parked in a Californian barn 40 years ago, it then moved to this garage in Arizona, where its been ever since. This project XK can be found here on eBay.

The current owner started restoring the car, but only got as far as pulling it apart. Thankfully the original engine and transmission are still with it, but the engine needs to be rebuilt. The XK150 was powered by Jaguar’s 3.4 liter inline six and produced 190 hp. This car’s engine was mated to a four speed manual transmission.

The interior has been stripped out, presumably to fix the floors. It appears most of the original pieces are with it and have been stored in the trunk. One thing that grabbed our attention is this dash. The XK150 came with a dash trimmed in leather, while this one appears to be wooden. It does have the correct center dash panel and Smith gauges, so it could be that someone removed the leather and finished the wood underneath.

This Cat looks solid and should make for a great starting point for a project. Parts are plentiful for these cars, but can be pricy. Hopefully, it is as solid as it looks, as it could help keep restoration costs down a bit. We would focus on getting it running and driving, then buff, polish, and shine up the original paint.

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. scot c

    ~ i would agree, ‘focus on getting it running and driving, then buff, polish, and shine up the original paint.’ it may be that the buyer will find good reason to tackle a complete body-off restoration. after all, it is the most stately sporting car. and verse-vice-a.

  2. Horse Radish

    It doesn’t say if it’s the owner of 40 years or a curbside dealer ???

  3. TVC15

    Guys , The Jaguar SS100 in the late 30s was the car that started Jaguars sports car history not the XKs

    • BLUCRU

      What on earth difference does your negative comment make???These great cars still command the most interest at the classic car events; they are liked because they stay together and are great driving machines around town and at “SPEED”…

  4. mikey

    I love the sentence “very easy restoration”………….. :!

    Why is it when some that sell cars and they mention that something doesn’t work, but, “is’ an easy fix”.

    Then why isn’t it fixed?, if it’s so stinkin’ easy…………….ugh

  5. scot c

    ~ @ Horse Radish,
    ‘It doesn’t say if it’s the owner of 40 years or a curbside dealer ???’
    the statement on eBay made me pretty sure a dealer made the listing.
    ‘I am known for finding incredible original cars from arizona and california.’
    do ya wonder what else he might be known for?

  6. scot c

    ~ @ mikey,
    plus one! “an easy fix” is that which you handle before posting the ad.
    i don’t think you can lose much money by having more receipts.

  7. BLUCRU

    So that I could get this on the road, a long time mechanic friend recommends I install a Toyota 7m, inline 6, 24 valve twincam w/port FI, and 4 or 5 speed O/D automatic trans… As time goes on I can shop carefully for the right parts for a complete restoration… Toooo many folks have butchered the engine compartment of these classic ladies with the likes of a Chevy V8, rendering the chassis worthless… Even turbocharging this engine leaves room, and without buggering up the cavity… Like with the Chevy V8, however, the front end will raise 1.5 to 2.0 inches, since this engine-trans combo is a couple of 100 lbs lighter than the standard JAG parts weigh in at…

    • ray

      Hi Blucru. Read with interest your 7M engine conversion. I am considering putting this (the turbo version) in an 67 s type. What is your experience with the 7M engine? Thanks a lot. Ray

  8. Greg Arnold

    I just finished ‘sorting’ an xk150S frame off restoration i bought that sat in a collection unregistered for 12 years. Just getting it purring and safe, and refreshed interior and seals set me back twenty-five K … Ouch. I’m told a complete restoration to a decent donor car these days is about $140K – it’s just math. These are complicated cars to restore

  9. CAJunker

    This is a 150, didn’t the later model, the 150S come with basically the engine that went into the E-Type? Thee must be a lot of good E-Type engines that could go into this along with a 4 spd+OD for a great cruiser. Stunning car.

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