Rare And Beautiful: 1941 Plymouth Woodie

41 Ply on trailer side view

Here’s a pretty interesting find that is for sale now here on craigslist in Glendale, Arizona, near Phoenix. Any woodie is desirable nowadays, and most of them are priced way out of range of the average old car enthusiast. I love wagons, and this ’41 Plymouth is a beauty. I like the simplicity of the drive train – a reliable L-head six cylinder with a manual transmission.

41 Ply shed as found

The seller’s description is incredibly spare considering the asking price! $17,500 is a stunning asking price for a restorable barn find which will need everything done to put it into driver condition, much less restored to show standards. The seller says it runs and drives, though there is no evidence that is actually possible, since all the pictures show it either in the barn or on the trailer that moved it from its long term storage. He says it’s “95%” complete (that leaves a lot of room for there to be expensive missing parts).

42 Ply dash

He does not tell us where the car was found, but it comes with a title, the miles are 116,795 and “delivery is available.”

41 Ply engine view

It did not take me long to find this really good article in Hemmings about a similar, but much better condition identical car, originally published in 2010, that includes everything you might want to know about these cars and summed it up by saying “No question, a 1941 Plymouth woody has very little going for it in the anonymity department. But when it comes to engineering, styling and driving pleasure, all at a price that’s well below the Dearborn alternative, it’s pretty hard to beat.”

41 Ply roof from inside

Then I found another 41 Plymouth woodie in really nice condition for sale on Hemmings.com for sale by Kanter Products for $37,000. As far as I am concerned that proves this barn find to be seriously over priced. Unless you do all the work yourself on this car, you will be spending heavily to bring this car back to life. I love barn finds, but there seems to be a lot of wishful thinking by sellers these days. What would you pay for this low rust example? Or would you just go out and buy one in better shape to begin with?

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Comments

  1. randy

    It’s hard to get an engine running with the plug wires off.

  2. Cassidy

    At this price, the seller will have a long time to get used to seeing this car. it might give him time to come up with a better ad and eventually get wise enough to lower the price down to a realistic level. It might take quite a few car guys looking at up close and pointing out what’s wrong and how expensive the restoration is going to be. By then, interest in the car will have dropped and he might have to find a barn to put it away for a few years in the hopes the value will increase. One thing not in his favor: the number of car guys who can do this kind of restoration are not increasing.

  3. boxdin

    Not a bad price, if this was done up right… 200,000 +

    • Rob

      200,000+ !!!??? 😄

      Maybe if it was pulling a Lambo on a trailer behind it across the auction block.

    • Jon

      And your dreamin also…. $200,000 ??

    • Dovi65

      $200K? On what planet? This is a Plymouth wagon, not a Chrysler T&C droptop.

  4. Paul B

    Buy the best you can and enjoy it. This is a beautiful car but way, way overpriced for its condition. Purchase price plus $100K in restoration costs gets you … a very expensive Plymouth.

  5. grant

    Well the boat in the carport has an Idaho registration so the car was perhaps found in Idaho?

  6. Gary

    I would like to have this as I’m sure many others would. The price is a bit steep in the current condition, I doubt there are but a handful of these old gems out there to be found today. If it sells the buyer will have a very time consuming project on his hands, and he better have some very deep pockets to boot!! OCPG list this @ $82k in #1 condition.

  7. Mark S Member

    I really like this car, but not $17500.00 worth of like. I could see it at that price if you brought it up to a #2, these woodies are very unique and pleasant to the eye. I would love to have one just to restore. I could see myself spending the rest of years restoring this car by hand. I wouldn’t even have to drive it just the pleasure of working on it would do. I wouldn’t want a kit I’d want to build it from scratch. The engines and drive lines are equally interesting rugged and simple. To bad at this price it’s just going to sit around and waiste away. Until the seller gives his head a shake.

  8. rancho bella

    The woodie thing started going downhill about six years ago. The interest is only kept alive by people in Hawaiian shirts…..and those are out as well…………but the wearer isn’t aware of it.

    • Jason Houston

      Hustlers, like this flippin’ a**hole, are never aware of anything of importance. They all have this wet dream about sticking a car on craigslist, then mysteriously a Brinks truck shows up overnight, wanting to know where to pile all the money sacks. As usually, he’s so greedy, he’s too lazy to even hose it off or back it off his trailer…or disclose where it came from. Nice car for ten grand, but I’ll pass.

  9. geomechs geomechs Member

    My dad could never figure out why there was so much interest in woodies. He told me that some of his friends’ families had them and added that they were cold, drafty, squeaky, noisy, dusty cars and he sure didn’t have any use for one. However, I didn’t share his opinion. I’d love to find one in similar condition to this one languishing in a barn somewhere. But I sure can’t justify the cost; it’s way above my budget. Sure has the potential for being a great finished project though.

  10. Little_Cars Alexander Member

    Jason/all–if you read the scant two lines of description on CL the seller does say they have photo documentation of the recovery and initial cleanup. Unfortunately looking at the photos it appears this tool has already begun taking the wood pieces off. One photo shows most of the door and quarter wood missing or removed leaving just the structural stuff behind. I wouldn’t be surprised if this vehicle fell apart when rolling onto the trailer. I hope someone doesn’t get suckered into doing that and be out $17,500.

  11. alfred

    I have to agree with GEOMECHS.my father told me the same kind of stories. my dad had one straight out of high school and said they were an awful car but all he and his brothers could afford . and he walked a mile to school uphill both ways in the snow

  12. rusty

    hee hee cool alfred

    Stories! You want stories?

    Well we did it tough too. All I could afford was a Morris Minor Woody straight out of highschool. We lived it tough.

    Aye! We lived in a cardboard box in the middle of the road because the snow was steeped up so high either side of us we couldnt access the hill either side to walk the mile to school so we were home schooled in that cardboard box in the middle of December in the middle of that road in the middle of Sydney [Australia]. And you think your dad did it tough Hee Hee

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