Short Bed With Patina: 1967 Chevrolet C-10

1967 Chevrolet C-10 Short Bed

It’s been said many times before, the classic truck market is on the rise! I’m not sure if the growing interest in old trucks is the result of the ever increasing values for muscle and sport cars or if it’s just that people are starting to realize how cool they really are. Either way, the truck market is on the climb and I don’t see it going anywhere but up in the foreseeable future. This Chevy C-10 has what the seller describes as original “patina”, whether you like the patina or not, this is a short bed and could be a great ride once it’s all fixed up! Find it here on eBay in Trinity, North Carolina with a current bid of $1,500.

1967 Chevrolet C-10

This truck looks to have been well used over the years, but it looks complete and solid. I see a few rust spots, so I would want to inspect it closer. The paint has an interesting look to it. I’m going to guess it’s been repainted at some point in its life, so it’s hard to say what might be hiding underneath. These trucks really could be a sweet machine and has a lot of potential! So how do you feel about collecting old trucks like this Chevy?

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Comments

  1. Fred

    I did an appraisal on one of these owned by a high end dealer, a restomodded truck done right. I’m not even a truck guy, but after driving it, I wanted it!

  2. Jim

    There was a time when patina meant needs a paint job.

    • Jason Houston

      Thank you… ‘patina’ is the latest buzz word to fall under the ax of people who don’t have a clue what it means!

  3. Jason Houston

    The rise in popularity of pickup trucks began in the late 1990s when the supply of readily-available passenger cars finally became extinct. If you went looking for a ’57 Chevy, you ended up with a truck because that’s all there was left. Like everything, it began in Southern California where, today, there are zero 50’s-60’s cars to be seen on the streets any more. California still remains the worst state to be hit by so-called well meaning but ill-informed environmentalists.

    • jaygryph

      Are you high? I’m in San Jose and I’ve seen a 60 corvair sedan, 64 corvair spyder convertible, lakewood corvair wagon and 65ish two door parked at a gas station. All but the one at the gas station moves around this area regularly. There’s a lot of old iron parked in driveways here, a big chrysler down the street, a cuda convertible in pieces in someone’s driveway nearby (I can only imagine the purchase requests THAT guy gets). There are a LOT of old cars in california, and they are out all the time because of the weather.

      It wasn’t the so called environmentalists that did it, you can blame them if you want, but it’s simply that old cars while fun as a hobby, are not as safe, fuel effecient, fast, or powerful as older rigs. I love them, have had lots, and still do have a number of old cars, but it’s pretty sad when the 4 cylinder in my Hyundai makes more horsepower than the 472 mill in my 73 cadillac.

      No replacement for displacement? Sure there is, when there’s technology involved to squeeze every bit of power out of an inch of air and fuel. Which is not to say it’s not way cooler if you have huge displacement AND the technology to boost it.

      In short, I think you’re wrong about there being zero old cars. Your mileage may vary.

  4. Howard A Member

    I’ll tell you why there’s an interest in trucks like this now. Ever take a look at what’s being passed off to the consumer as a truck nowadays? Tis’ no truck, more like a car with a box. Just shows, people want a good old, bare bones truck they can throw stuff in, and not break something plastic. Man, this is one of the barest trucks I’ve seen in a long time. No Cigarette lighter OR arm rests. ( wonder if it has sun visors?) Somebody in 1967 said, “I want the cheapest pickup truck you have,,,,no options”. I had a B-I-L that did that with a Toyota years ago. The salesperson was reluctant to do that, as there’s no money in a bare truck. I think he went to 3 different places, before a dealer would do that. Great truck here.

    • jaygryph

      It’s interesting what dealerships will do. Went to three or more of them before I could get my base model car. One finally did it and it ended up being that my entire family bought one so we purchased three brand new cars from them, one of them fully optioned, AND they got a trade in of a nice minivan out of it, simply for taking the risk.

  5. Mark

    Jaygryph, I know what you mean about the Hyundai motor, the 2.4L Theta, it makes about as much HP as the 4.6 in my ’96 Mustang. Though it can’t sound like the 4.6 it’s a high performance engine. With variable valve timing, dual overhead cams, penta combustion chambers and direct gas injection. Actually the stated 201 HP is said to be more but downplayed by Hyundai for some regulatory reasons.

    I had a ’68 C10, bought it in ’79 for $50, it had the 250 Stovebolt and a three speed moved to the floor. It sounded like a school bus and couldn’t be hurt. I have a picture of me in it with the rear end five feet off the ground hanging by a chain connected to a big oak tree I was attempting to pull down after it was damaged by hurricane Gloria in 1985. Try that with a truck today, the pic would probably be just half a truck.

  6. jim s

    my kind of truck, 6 cyl, manual trans, no other options, and predented with rough paint. seller should have worked harder to get the motor running and needs to drop the reserve. then let the buyers have at it. great find.

  7. randy

    From my experience, most trucks back then were bare bones. They had a job to do, and nothing more. The sedan in the driveway was for creature comforts. The luxuries came along when the single men and some truck loving women had only one vehicle, and it was a truck. The owners wanted more comfort in their only vehicle. That is also when the prices of new trucks hit the stratosphere. New trucks are and have been over priced since the 80’s at least. Trucks back in the day were much cheaper than cars. Another explanation of the higher truck prices could be that in order to raise the prices of trucks, the manufacturers had to put more stuff in them to justify the high prices.
    Here’s my ’65 SWB Ford.

  8. piper62j

    OOOKKKKK,,, But needs work… The rear frame rails usually have plenty of cancer to deal with along with the cab mounts up front and the bottom rear cab corners..

    Fun to drive..

  9. JW454

    Isn’t this Buford Pusser’s truck?

  10. Mark S Member

    I had a 1970 GMC version of this. Different grille 4 headlights. Not sure you guys had the GMC below the border it stood for General Motors Canada. When I got mine it was already 13 years old and started life as a service station truck that every body kicked the hell out of. The second owner was my older brother. He fixed it up repainted it and drove the hell out of it some-more. Then he sold it to me I repainted it again this time to a factory colour. I drove that truck for fourteen more years as a daily driver, it is to this day the best vehicle I have ever owned. Your example here brings back lots of great memories.

    • JW454

      Mark,

      Down here GMC stands for General Motors Corporation. GMC trucks were sold at GM dealers such as Pontiac, Buick, Oldsmobile, and Cadillac.

    • randy

      The GMC was also touted as a heavier duty truck by some south of the border.

      • Mark S Member

        They were up here too. But I worked in the mechanics trade for 25 year and on these older one the only difference really was badging

      • Howard A Member

        Hi randy, for the longest time, the joke was, a GMC is just a Chevy with lockwashers. I can say that, because I drive a GMC Sonoma, which, aside from the “GMC” on the grill, is no different than a S-10 Chevy. There was a time, GMC was indeed a fancier truck, but that went out in the ’60’s.

  11. JamestownMike

    Thanks Barn Finds, I wouldn’t of known about this one if it wasn’t for you! This truck is only 16 miles away from me. I’m going to look it over this Saturday.

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