20k Documented Miles: 1969 Ford Mustang GT Fastback

Everything about this car is so clean, maybe even spotless. Even the photographs were taken when the light was best to show off the Indian Fire (“Y” Color Code) paint. This 1969 Ford Mustang GT Fastback (officially: “Sportsroof”) can be seen with an additional 70 pictures here on eBay. The bidding ends on Friday, January 1, 2021, currently standing at $50,000 which does not meet the reserve. There is no BIN price. This very fine Mustang currently resides in Appling, Georgia, ready for your pick up and a short drive to sunset at the Gulf of Mexico should you win the auction.

This car was professionally nut-and-bolt restored between 1999 and 2000 and was subsequently sold at Barrett-Jackson the year it was finished.  In 2007, the new owner had the entire 351 ci engine rebuilt.  The odometer now reads 19,937 miles and has been documented to be the actual original miles since built in San Jose, CA on October 15, 1968.  A Marti Report accompanies the posting with some interesting stats: this car is one of  4,085 Mustang Sportsroof cars that were “GT” equipped.  Only 2,770 GT Sportsroof cars had this paint and trim color combination. The car comes with an extra set of the original equipment wheels with Firestone Wide Oval Tires mounted on them.

The 351 engine does not currently have the original 4-bbl carburetor although the original carb comes with the car in a box with a rebuild kit.  The stock-specs engine feeds an FMX Cruise-o-Matic “X” code transmission to a standard Mustang 3.25:1 rear end.  From the seller’s listing, it doesn’t specifically say the engine, trans, and rear-end are numbers matching–something to verify with Seller.

For real?  It’s really hard to understand how to get the bucket, sponge, and hose under there to get this thing looking this clean. Do they sell exhaust pipe polish now?

The interior is Ford’s Black Kiwi Vinyl on the standard Mustang bucket seats.  A few points off for a replacement radio that mimics the FoMoCo AM-only radio but has a slide down bar with an FM tuner built-in.

But add some points for the perfect condition of the interior rugs, mats, dash, the lot.  The photographs of the car on eBay are very well done as was the detailing prior to the photoshoot.

OK, a little body panel and bumper misalignment may make some judges bonkers.  But this car is just so easy on the eyes: That roofline, the bold shoulder line, the paint deep enough to jump into. The only question after all the cash outlay and raising the insurance on the house and garage is do you hire your friend’s kid the bodybuilder to guard it in the furthest space away from the door at the grocery store? Paranoia and anxiety of ownership aside, quite the head-turning car cruise trophy magnet.

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Comments

  1. Bob_in_TN Bob_in_TN Member

    Good write-up Mike.

    Excellent car, high-end restoration, attractive color. Good alternative to the more-common Mach 1. As I understand it, when sales of the new Mach 1 took off, the GT package was discontinued after being offered for only part of the model year. Note this was an Oct. 1968 build.

    With my judging hat on, I could nitpick some of the undercarriage finishes, but if you are going to drive the car at all, that is to be expected. Maybe more to the point, very very few cars have this level of detail applied to the undercarriage.

    One minor point: the Marti reports are commonly mis-interpreted. In this case there are 2,770 Sportsroofs with this paint/trim, not GT Sportsroofs. With only 4,085 GT Sportsroofs in total, the number in this paint/trim for GT Sportsroofs is probably no more than a few hundred, of which a small percentage survive.

    High-dollar car, and worth it in my opinion.

    Like 39
    • Mike Tarutis Staff

      Thanks so much for the kind words.

      Very important for true Mustang experts to weigh in as you did and point out the finer details.

      I appreciate and expect that from our very well informed readers.

      Like 11
  2. MattR Member

    The ‘Indian Fire’ paint color is stunning.

    Like 26
    • JonArd

      Couldn’t get away with anything “Indian” today …

      Like 12
      • Michael

        Good point. My high school sports teams were called Indians. There were many Native American Tribes where I grew up in NY. Now, they are called SPIRIT. How boring. I love this Mustang.

        Like 9
      • Terry

        Native American Fire paint

        Like 1
  3. Moparman Member

    WOW!!! I can’t add anything to what hasn’t already been said about this one, other than the fact that I’ve drooled onto my keyboard! GLWTA!! :-)

    Like 11
    • Mike Tarutis Staff

      . . .and you’re a MOPAR MAN!

      Thanks for writing. Always glad to see guys looking with an open mind at cars that aren’t their avowed car makes!

      BTW: BarnFinds expressly disclaims any damage to computer equipment as a result of users drooling into their keyboards, spilling beverages, or jaws dropping onto the keys, laptop or tablet as a result of viewing our posts.

      [Kidding, of course. There is no such actual disclaimer. Maybe I should bring it up with management?]

      MJT

      Like 12
      • Terry

        About the body panel misalignment mentioned earlier. Minor misalignments were common out of the factory in those years. People, not robotics, assembled those cars back then.

        Like 1
  4. JBD

    Speechless!
    The GT option sportsroof was rare and this car is stunning. Sometimes the 2nd or 3rd owner of the B-J auction cars makes out. The quality and documentation of B-J cars has been falling over time.

    Like 9
  5. 370zpp 370zpp Member

    Beautiful car. But a couple of questions pop up for me;

    If it was professionally nut-and-bolt restored(?) between 1999 and 2000 then why in 2007 did the new owner have the engine rebuilt?
    Also, after all the extensive work was done here, why leave the body panel and bumper misalignment like that?

    Like 13
    • James Quinn

      I was thinking the same thing about the engine. And if only 20k miles, again, why would it need a rebuild?

      As for Body panel fitment, I have owned around 12 Mustangs. Fender extensions never fit properly in my experience. I had a beautiful 70 Mach1 that the rear extensions drove me nuts. You basically had to choose between having the top edge or side edge be flush. I recently restored my 67 Cougar GT and although it is much better, the front bumper on Mustangs and Cougars have no front to back adjustments. I slotted my bumper brackets to allow me to line it up perfectly.

      Like 6
  6. James Quinn

    Also, Why did someone wreck the body lines with one of those God awful wings. Wings are for planes, not cars.

    Like 4
    • Mike Tarutis Staff

      Good point James: not exactly sure how much downforce that wing would provide with the stock 351 engine powering the car.

      So, if it’s not for practical purposes–unless this car can reach gravitational escape velocity. Must be purely aesthetic.

      James has checked in with a thumbs down on the aesthetics. Let’s hear other comments–personally, I am ambivalent, take it or leave it. I can argue it either way.

      I do agree that those lines are just fine without it, but would NOT pass on the car if there were a wingie dingie.

      And BTW, I remember making multiple Mustang model cars that probably had the same problem with aligning the bumpers as the real ones.

      I wonder how Concours points are affected by these alignment issues?

      I was also looking squarely at the trunk and the discrepancy between the width of the trunk lines matching with the fender extension lines where they meet the trunk–it’s a production car, I get it–but it doesn’t seem there is any way to adjust out the lines between the trunk lid and the fender lines.

      Like 2
      • Stan Marks

        Here’s my comment…….
        We don’t live in a perfect world.

        IMHO.. This pony leaves me speechless. Best looking Mustang, I’ve ever seen, on Barn Finds.

        Like 7
    • Skorzeny

      It’s not a ‘wing’, it’s a spoiler. A wing, as on an aircraft, provides lift. A spoiler provides downforce. Like Mr. Tarutis, I’m ambivalent.

      Like 5
      • Jay E. Member

        Wasn’t it called a Go-Wing by Ford?

        Like 1
    • Tort Member

      Thank You for commenting what I was about to say. Beautiful car in every way but if it not meant to be raced why ruin the beautiful lines of the car. That goes for not only this Mustang but other Ford, GM and Chrysler built cars.

      Like 1
      • Caca DeToro

        Correct me if I’m wrong, but a spoiler was optional on the GT as well as the Mach 1 that year.

  7. James Quinn

    Test

    Like 1
  8. James Quinn

    I was thinking the same thing about the engine. And if only 20k miles, again, why would it need a rebuild?

    As for Body panel fitment, I have owned around 12 Mustangs. Fender extensions never fit properly in my experience. I had a beautiful 70 Mach1 that the rear extensions drove me nuts. You basically had to choose between having the top edge or side edge be flush. I recently restored my 67 Cougar GT and although it is much better, the front bumper on Mustangs and Cougars have no front to back adjustments. I slotted my bumper brackets to allow me to line it up perfectly.

    Like 3
    • Mike Tarutis Staff

      Guys–on the engine rebuild after 18k miles: maybe the hoses were dirty? The gaskets were collecting a millimeter of grease and road dust? or Maybe the inside ports of the water pump were dirty or the white writing on the hoses and belts was turning tan-ish?

      Anyone who can keep a car this clean has my respect!

      I’d change the belts and hoses every ten miles!

      Like 4
  9. Stangalang

    Honestly this is a beautiful car..I was gonna repaint mine back to original black but looking at this I may have changed my mind. As far as a rebuild it could be a cam swap..valve seats something like that. But shouldn’t have needed a bottom end rebuild. Gorgeous stang..hopefully someone will take care of it

    Like 4
  10. Stephen Miklos

    OMG! This stang is beautiful looking! I seen these growing up. The back I like without the rear spoiler but with the window louvers. To me that was a killer look. The next owner u
    Is going to be very lucky to get this. People out there putting together a 69 stang could use this vehicle as a reference to where to put the markings and how to have it look underneath the vehicle which you can eat off of.. to me this is too perfect to drive. Happy New Year everyone!! 🎇🎉🎆🐻🇺🇲

    Like 5
  11. Donnie

    Nice car, very rare to have the four barrel carb on the sport roof. Most came with a two barrel.

    Like 1
  12. Georgi Bennett

    I was lucky enough to own a 69 428 Cobra Jet Mustang. The speedometer went to 140 and I could bury it. (I was going through my stooopid phase.) I have never driven as fast a car since. The torque of this engine would let the car jump from 90 to 120 without hesitation. Now I am a little ol’ lady. I drive a Buick, but I have a pristine 73 Mustang Convertible in the garage. Sometimes you just can’t get over them.

    Like 8
  13. Scott

    Wow, I bought my first Mustang right down the road from Appling in Evans Georgia in 1983. It was a 69 Grande, bought a 69 Sportsroof in Augusta GA in ‘93. There were so many muscle cars in that area in the 80’s and even the 90’s used as daily drivers. No rust and very cheap. I think the future president of Mustang Club of America had a Mustang shop in Augusta back then, think his first name was Steve. Still have the 69 pop off gas cap he sold me.

    Like 2
    • Caca DeToro

      I like those “bigger” Mustangs of 69-73. And I’m partial to the Grande’s looks. Also, they came with just about every trim option.

  14. Jonathan

    Worth every penny !

    Like 3
  15. randy

    Having owned a few pre-69 Stangs, I like this one. As a custodian of history they should be driven now and then for public appreciation & memories. Gotta admit that I would sub-in a close ratio top loader just because.

    Like 1
  16. Desert Rat

    Now you see, I have always loved the rear pedestal style spoilers like this one and the ones that came on MOPARS, guess the kid in me never grew up…

    Like 1
  17. Karl

    Wow! That car is beautiful and does it POP! It’s going to be expensive and likely worth every penny!

    Like 1
  18. Tort Member

    Thank You for commenting what I was about to say. Beautiful car in every way but if it not meant to be raced why ruin the beautiful lines of the car. That goes for not only this Mustang but other Ford, GM and Chrysler built cars.

  19. JoeNYWF64

    Inside hood release is uncommon on 1969 cars.
    I would like to see what this car looked liked just before the restoration.
    I remember seeing brand new cars on dealers lots with surface rust on the front end components from just sitting outside for months, unsold.
    Would like to see an autolite battery here(or a cover) & 4 tires that match that spare.
    I find it VERY odd that rolldown side rear windows were not offered in ’69-70 fastbacks, but were in non fastbacks! I don’t get it.
    Could you get a 351 or even 428 or boss 429 fastback with plain steel wheels & hubcaps, like on this 302?
    http://cdn-0.barnfinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Mustang-e1432148351237.jpg
    Would be a sleeper.

    • Marvin Askins

      Some GTs came with 390 motors. I agree that a car of this caliber should come with an Autolite battery. Anything less, IMHO, diminishes the image of these .With all due respect to Interstate, Diehard, etc. nothing turns me off more than when I see one of these and/or Fram or other oil filters under the hoods. It hurts but I pay the $350+/- every few years to replace the battery in my ’67 GT350.

      Like 1
  20. martinsane

    Everyone already started tonaddress the elephant in the room, the engine rebud on top of rebuild on top of very low miles.

    But i am curious what it sold for at Barret in 2000.

  21. J.R. Hollingsworth

    It’s alright but nothing to write home about.

  22. Maryk

    Beautiful GT. We bought a 70 Sport Roof in 1970. It was red loved it. But we got pregnant, so we traded it for a 72 Grand Torino. Mistake, but newlyweds figured we needed a larger vehicle.

  23. KKW

    Wow, so much distress over a rear spoiler, an extremely popular item of the era, nobody complained back then, maybe it’s the new gen. As far as the engine rebuild, the car is over 50 years old, a lot can happen in 50 years, even with low miles, maybe it was ram rodded, who knows. But it’s a beautiful car and my personal favorite year of Mustang.

  24. John R

    What a beauty. I think this would fit through the back doors of my house but I don’t know if I can position it in my living room and still see the TV.

    • Stan Marks

      Build another house around it.

  25. Jonathan

    $54,000 and didn’t hit reserve

    Like 1

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