V8 Manual Packard-Baker: 1956 Parkview Wagon

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While the Packard-Baker cars are a bit rare and in my opinion underappreciated, I always found the styling and looks of the 2 door wagons to be quite pleasing. In fact this is one of the coolest wagons you could buy during the time as you could have opted for a stick shift supercharged V8. Unfortunately, this wagon does not have a supercharger, but it does feature a stick shift V8 which is still a great configuration. Originally a native Washington state car, this wagon appears quite complete and original minus a repaint many years ago. The seller is asking a very ambitious $11,500 for this wagon project. Take a look at it here on craigslist out of Escondido, California.

The 259 “Sweepstakes” V8 with its 3 speed manual is thought to be original, but other than that, there is no further information. I would hope that for the asking price that this wagon would be a running and driving project. There looks to be a new battery in place, and the engine appears to be complete. You can see the original red paint on the firewall while also seeing the blue over spray on the upper portion of the firewall as well.

More of the factory red paint is apparent inside of this old wagon. The dash is in nice shape, but the steering wheel has broken down quite a bit and leaves a little more than half of the rim in place. The door panels are missing, as is the carpet. Where the carpet used to be is a floor covered with surface rust and what appears to be a wet area. The bench seat is in rough shape, and looks to have split a long time ago based off of the scotch tape on the upper portion of the seat. No matter how you cut it, the interior is going to need a full restoration with the exception of the dash.

Originally two tone red and black, this wagon has an unusual appeal with its later color transition to blue. There are several areas where the paint is chipping off revealing the original paint underneath. I would guess it’s an Earl Shibe job, but that may not be such a bad thing. If one was dedicated enough (and I mean dedicated), the blue paint could likely be removed to reveal the original paint. Or you could simply leave this wagon as is, or sand it for paint prep. Thankfully the body looks remarkably solid with no obvious rust to be seen. There is some minor surface rust on the under body and chassis, and there is some minor surface rust at the bottom of the quarters as well. Some metal prep would likely neutralize the surface rust on the quarters yielding a nearly body work free project to work with. Do you think this wagon is worth the asking price, even with its rust free and straight body?

Auctions Ending Soon

Comments

  1. Andy

    In model year 1956, Packards were still being built in Detroit on their own chassis, so if this is a ’56, then it’s just a plain Studebaker, and if it says Packard, then it’s a ’57. The ’58s had a totally different front end and funky tailfins. The grille on this car tells me it’s a ’56 Studebaker. And of course, Packard-Baker, or Packardbaker, was only a nickname, never official.

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  2. DETROIT LAND YACHT

    Crate Hemi…bagged…lowered…wheels…interior…paint…fold-back sunroof.
    Do it.

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  3. J PaulMember

    The ad itself only claims this to be a Studebaker, not a Packard. Neat car, though…you certainly won’t see another at your local show.

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  4. Vince H

    A supercharger was not available in 56 unless you went after market. Stu V offered a kit for Studebaker V8s.

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  5. Kevin A Russell

    Yes, clearly a Studebaker, Commander model. Those knock off Packards of a couple years later did a huge disservice to the clean lines of the Studes.

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  6. glen

    I’ve never seen one of these,I like it.To me, it looks like a blend of a 50’s Chevy, with a British touch. I also see this looking good with huge slicks in tubs, with a great big blown 8 sticking out the hood! and wheelie bars to keep it from flipping over. I really like this thing.

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  7. kuzspike

    love the speedometer in this one.
    It would make for an interesting restomod, especially if the supercharger can be retrofitted.

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    • HoA Rube GoldbergMember

      The “Cyclops” speedo came out right at the height of science fiction movies. I read, they discontinued it because it freaked people out.

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    • Jim Marston

      Studebaker Did not Offer Superchargers until 1957 !

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  8. John D

    The Parkardbaker name still gives me a chuckle. I think this is a good looking car and if it drives and stops, the seller may make a case for his asking price. I would expect it to be understood that is ‘or best offer’.

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  9. Vince H

    There are vendors in the Studebaker club that do complete interiors.

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  10. Don Sicura

    Studebaker made great cars, Packard made magnificent cars, Studebaker-Packard made crappy cars.

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    • Kenny

      If Studebaker made great cars, why would putting fancy trim and plush interiors in them with a Packard badge suddenly make the “crappy cars”? Have you ever owned, much less, driven one?

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  11. JTNC

    An interesting but not particularly valuable Studebaker. I hope someone will restore it out of love, but it’s just an old Studebaker. There is nothing Packard about this car whatsoever. As others have pointed out, the 1956 Packard was the last year of the traditional Packard.

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  12. RicK

    That would be Earl Scheib. Anyhow I like how the taillights and what appears to be the rear quarter panel from the earlier Stude wagon were used.

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  13. MrF

    Can anyone identify the big orange “can” in front of the carburetor? The world’s largest Fram filter? A wannabe supercharger? A shop vac? (It’s not the air filter, since the original oil bath is to the rear.)

    Never saw one of these. Interesting how the pedals still go through the floor, quite a throwback for this era of suspended pedals.

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    • Vince H

      MrF

      That is the canister that holds the oil filter. Chevy V8 had one but it was on the underside of the engine.

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      • MrF

        That big? Remember the idea of using toilet paper as the oil fliter? (It had a name that I’ve forgotten.) The Studebaker would have required a megaroll!

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      • HoA Rube GoldbergMember

        That was called the Frantz Oil Cleaner. The filter resembled a roll of toilet paper, and I heard of people trying it, but you know what happens to wet toilet paper.

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    • Pete Phillips

      Studebaker pedals went through the floor as late as 1962, I think, on the Hawks. They were very late to update that.

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      • Vince H

        Pete

        64 in the Hawks

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      • jim smith

        i had a ’62 lark with suspended pedals

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  14. XMA0891

    (Not that I’ve ever looked) but I’ve never seen one of these before. Delightful old wagon. Love it!

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  15. Jon Pankin

    Well, I dunno about that… The Packardbakers were essentially Studebakers with a little more bling, and after Packard’s final demise Studebaker went on to build some really nice cars – Avantis and Hawks, for instance.

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  16. GPMember

    I thought they had a 289 V8 ? Anybody…

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    • Jon Pankin

      Commanders had 259s.

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    • MrF

      They were initially 259, later enlarged to 289 (maybe even 239 to start). One interesting aspect of Studebaker engines is that they did not allow for much increase in displacement. This is much different from other brands that were able to use the same blocks for increasingly large displacements. It probably contributed to the use of superchargers to compensate.

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      • Jon Pankin
      • MrF

        Examples include the Ford 272/292/312, Pontiac 287/316/336/389, various Chrysler engines, and–perhaps best known–the small block Chevy 265-400. These “families” have interesting relationships (like I think the Ford 332 is not related to the Y-block, but the 352/390) and even duplicate displacements (302/351 Cleveland and Windsor). I’ll stop there since others probably either know already or couldn’t care less…

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      • MrF

        Initially 232 ci, per excellent article below

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      • Roger

        The Studebaker V8’s started out with 232 cu.in,then on to 259 and 289 cu.in.versions,Studebaker was styling wise way ahead of Detroit for a long time.

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  17. curt

    Great lines, not like the plastic cookie cutter cars of today…needs to be restored.

    Like 1
    • Jon Pankin

      Seriously expensive proposition. The horrible paint alone would cost a fortune, not to mention the interior. Maybe a quick driver-style fix up, but a real restoration isn’t worth it on this car.

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  18. redwagon

    this looks a lot like a checker wagon to me. wonder who styled both?

    i like the 2 door look and a lot cheaper than a similar year nomad or safari that’s for damn sure.

    biggest loss to car driving humanity is that buick never had a 2 door wagon like the nomad and safari for 55-57.

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  19. LAWRENCE

    1956 was the first year of the 289 in the President….GH got the Packard motor in 56….57 saw the first of the supercharged 289’s……

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  20. LAWRENCE

    Nice rare wagon….and note – the early front ends will bolt right on !

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  21. Troy s

    Has the right look to it, a bit understated to say the least, which grabbed my attention right away. Why I like ’55 chevys, simple, understated, yet easily transformed into a real head turner. Same applies to this car here.😎

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  22. Rick

    The value of this car is that it is complete and rust free. Don t ever see that in a car this old. Save it

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    • Jon Pankin

      Actually, here in CA we see that all the time…

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  23. Loco Mikado

    $11,500 is a lot for a Studebaker. Go to Hemmings and you can buy a lot of nice restored and running Studebakers for the same money including the more desirable Hawks. This thing is overpriced by a factor of 8 to 10. Packardbakers only a 1957-58 thing.

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  24. bog

    He dropped his asking price to $9500, so perhaps someone had a talk with him or more research on his part. Regardless, I agree with those that thought this car reminded them of ’55/’56 Chevys. Thought that’s what it was from the “small” photo. Just different enough. And interesting enough, in my humble opinion, to be freshened, if possible. (Though not by me). Once had a “snowbank” ’63 Biscayne with a drivers seat just like that. Throw pillow stuffed in to prevent spring “procto” and a thick blanket over the whole mess. Great Chicago winter car ! LOL….

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  25. Jim Amberson

    Nice restorable,
    Studebaker, however is only worth, maybe $4500–$5000..at most, only if completely matching numbers, original engine, transmission and it is drivable as is, if not then worth Much less !

    Probable cost of PROPER restoration, would be in the range of $10,000 to $20,000, so buy it for your self, restore it, enjoy it!

    These are rare enough that I have only seen two in the last 25 classic car shows I’ve been to…

    NOT a Packard Baker is just Studebaker,

    Like 0

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