Go Mango! 1970 Dodge Super Bee

Decades of fading barely dulls the impact of ’70s Mopar colors like Dodge’s Go Mango. As you’ll see below, this 1970 Dodge Super Bee in La Mirada, California wears a shiny coat of this crazy color in the engine compartment, the perfect welcome for its freshly built 383. A rebuilt transmission and other parts testify to this classic muscle car’s stalled restoration. The listing here on Facebook Marketplace seeks a new owner willing to give $20,500 to propel this project over the finish line. Considering the rusty remnants of Mopars we’ve seen sell for just less than that, it may represent a good value for the right buyer Thanks to reader numskal for spotting this promising orange ‘Bee.

According to the (detached) fender tag, this well-optioned Dodge came with the Super Bee package and the associated 335 HP 383 cid (6.3L) V8, heavy-duty three-speed automatic transmission, air conditioning, and more. We hate to hear a seller offering their classic due to illness, and we hope this Super Bee’s current owner is wrenching again soon. Thanks to MyMopar for some details.

I’ve painted a B-Body engine compartment before, on my ’66 Dodge Coronet, and it doesn’t take much skill to best the factory, but this one looks amazing in Go Mango, and well-sprayed. Ford and GM painted their engine bays black in those days, so popping the hood on a classic Mopar always adds some pop in comparison.

In the category of “things that make you go hmm,” the cynic in me wonders why a factory Go Mango car would have what looks like gold or green behind the door, and why a car with no V1* vinyl top code would have the trim for a vinyl top.

The rebuilt 383 block casting shows a date from November of 1968. The fender tag decodes a M6X9 black bucket-seat interior with center woodgrain console, A01 Light Package, A48 Dress-up Package, power brakes, hood / fender-mounted turn signal indicators, and V6X Longitudinal Black Stripes on the Go Mango paint. Let’s hope someone takes the torch and gets this partially-restored Dodge back on the road. What’s your favorite swinging ’70s paint color?

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Comments

  1. 8banger 8banger Member

    I’ve always been a sucker for any sort of orangish color…..

    Like 8
  2. Steve Clinton

    “…it may represent a good value for the right buyer” Are you people nuts?

    Like 7
  3. Steve R

    You can tell the car has been sitting for a long time due to the amount of rust on the resurfaced flywheel and dust on the “freshly” painted water pump. The seller says “paperwork available, clear title”, which normally translates into, the car is not in my name. That practice saves the seller the cost of transferring the title plus 10% sales tax, thus boosting their profit. I have a hunch the seller is a flipper and the previous owner was the one that started the restoration but gave up due to health issues, since only a fool gets this far along with a restoration project without putting it in their name. A prudent buyer will make sure they only hand over payment to the seller if his name is on the title.

    Steve R

    Like 15
  4. Steve Clinton

    When is a hood not a hood?…when it’s ajar.
    Either…
    1. the hood won’t close
    2. or the seller is too lazy to close it.

    Like 7
  5. EPO3

    The last orange mopar i had was a 1969 road runner.I repainted it black. No regrets .Hey i was a kid

    Like 2
  6. Bill F

    Sounds like someone is building a car underneath a lonely fender tag. It’ll be a beauty when it’s done for sure….but I think we are looking at a clone here.

    That’s just the cynic in me coming out. I hope I’m wrong.

  7. Chris

    Love that color also awesommmmmmeeeee car .That front end is a killer . Wish it was mine ,but of course finished

  8. Mark

    Awesome car….I would however clone this as a Coronet RT because my dad owned one until about 1981, fast and quick car. Might not be as quick as my Viper but it would hang with it on the highway.

  9. Bill McCoskey

    RE: Vinyl top trim.

    It was very common in the 1960s and ’70s for new car dealers to have a local trim shop install a vinyl top, if that was what it took to get the sale. Those chrome trim parts and the top fabric [already cut & ready to fit] would have been in the MoPaR parts zone and delivered to the dealer the next day.

    So I am not surprised to see a car with a vinyl top but no top listed on the fender tag. And if you want to keep it stock as per the fender tag, take the top moldings off and weld up the holes, then sell the trim pieces to someone who does want the vinyl top!

    Like 3
  10. Steve Clinton

    NOTICE: Do NOT say anything disparaging about sellers who post on the site as private parties. Your comment will be removed!

    Like 2
    • Bill McCoskey

      OK, since I don’t see a comment that could be considered for removal, Can I assume it’s been pulled? If so, that’s good to hear.

  11. James Martin

    Get out the bong and some of that special Mopar weed. Then I will bid!

  12. Arthell64 Member

    It’s gone of funny back in the 1970’s I hated the front end on the 1970 Dodge coronet but now for some reason I like them. Better than a rusted out charger.

    • Andy

      I still hate the front end on these things, UGLY !!!

  13. wilbert carlstrom

    I had a 69 superbee , and if i had 20,000 that one would be mine.

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