11,000 Original Miles: 1968 Dodge D100

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Does it get any better than this? Well, I suppose if you were the one to originally discover this 11,0000 mile 1968 Dodge D100 pickup here on craigslist, it probably was pretty sweet. Now, the current seller has it listed for nearly $20K on the Palm Springs craigslist page, and I doubt it was originally procured for that much. To the victor go the spoils, though, as this survivor-grade truck is pretty tough to top. 

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I can’t find any other evidence of this D100 showing up at an auction or estate sale recently, so it could have just been a case of being in the right place, at the right time. The listing doesn’t read like that of a family member selling grandpa’s old truck, but who knows? What I do know is that interior looks damn near spotless and better than some reupholstery jobs I’ve seen. When’s the last time a white-ringed steering wheel looked that good? I suppose the quality of the truck justifies the $18,995 asking price, but that’s up to you to decide.

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The bigger question is, who buys a truck like this and then never uses it? More importantly, buys a truck like this, never uses it, and manages to keep it in pristine condition? It’s unheard of. The D100 wears an attractive mint-green color and the bright color of the lenses, bumper and Dodge lettering on the tailgate all support the low-mileage claims. The only trouble is, I’d be absolutely petrified to use this thing. It would be on a trailer for any show I attended, and otherwise under cover when not being used. Where’s the fun in that?

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This Dodge D100 looks quite unrepeatable, and the condition is nothing short of impressive. I’m not sure that it’s destined to be anything other than a showpiece in a collection, but if it’s survived this long with such low mileage, I suspect this Dodge deserves a continued easy retirement. Would you consider putting up the asking price for such a pristine example, or look for something more usable?

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Comments

  1. Bill

    Another example of $19000 spent THEN replacing all the brake hydraulics and cooling components! With current trucks costing 40k and more maybe $19000 is a deal BUT with the knowledge that another $3000 having to be spent to use it as a vehicle.

    Like 1
    • RayT Member

      Jeff’s point above is important: what would you DO with it? Yeah, you could get it in operating shape and have well North of $20K invested, but it’s essentially useless unless you’re willing to drop its “value” significantly by enjoying it as a functioning vehicle.

      Heck, I wouldn’t feel comfortable driving it to the supermarket, much less filling the bed with 2x4s for a home project. Well, I would, but I see cars and trucks as something to use and enjoy, not stare at in a heated, climate-controlled garage. So I’d be taking a big hit financially, and think a new F150 would be a better deal all the way around.

      Like 1
      • Marshall

        Maybe Hollywood would like to buy it if they got a big enough warehouse to store all of their “period piece” movie props. Of course I think that would cost too much to store them.Instead they just simply rent them out when they need them. In the case of this truck, it would be used in a movie that takes place in 1968. But they better not wreck it! Nowadays they have computer technology that can simulate car crashes.

  2. geomechs geomechs Member

    I’m disappointed to see all those pictures and not one shot of the engine bay. I would suspect a 225 but at that time I started to see a lot of 318s show up. If this truck came my way I would drive it and use it. Not real hard but it would be seen driving away from the building supplies with the bed full of sheet rock and wood, or headed down to the local machine shop with the engine components from my next project. To own one is to drive it.

    • Texas Tea

      I’m with you geomechs. Nothing about the engine, so It has to be a 225. Which is okay, but at least say as much. A bs add as far as I’m concerned.

      I love the truck and the color.

    • Marshall

      If you want to do that, then you ought to get a much newer one with low miles. To drive this one too much would ruin the low mileage collectibility of it, even if you took perfect care of it.. But on the other hand, do not drive it at all also could be bad for it even if it is stored in a perfect environment. It’s a catch 22! Damned if you do and damned if you don’t. Bada bing bada boom.

  3. JW454

    I’d have to replace that back bumper with something that looked a little less homemade but, outside of that, I’d enjoy owning it. I know there were companies that made those bumpers as a low cost option but, they never appealed to me.

    • seth

      bumpers did not come with trucks back then, they were an option or you bought one from jc whitney

      Like 1
  4. Rick

    Looks like the recipient of a restoration

  5. dj

    I have to agree with everyone else. I had the chance to buy a 79 Trans Am 10th Anniversary Car with 13 miles on it. Dad was like, what are you going to do with it? You can’t drive it or the value will decrease and it would have to be stored inside. What good is it, just to look at? I had to agree and passed on the car.

    Like 1
  6. PaulG

    The ad has several photos that look to verify the originality. The data plate states it has the 225 slant 6.
    Nice truck, and if you put 2-3K miles on it a year, it would still be low mileage…

  7. Tom

    What do you do with it? If you like this model – Drive it, use it, maintain it and let the enjoyment offset the small amount of depreciation that this unit will incur if cared for. A new truck would depreciate the entire value of this truck in about 3-4 years.

  8. angliagt

    I love these old trucks,but the newer ones drive so much
    nicer.I had a really nice ’68 F250,but at about 9 mpg,it didn’t get
    driven much.I have a ’95 Dodge Dakota,& plan on keeping it.

    • Marshall

      I had a ‘69 F250 with a canopy, 360 motor and a four-speed with compound low. And 9 miles a gallon was just about what it got too. Needless to say, I did not keep it very long. But it was fun to drive while I had it.

  9. Chebby

    The “precious investment” mentality that has taken over this hobby is totally out of control.

    This is basically a fancy wheelbarrow. Yes, it’s pretty. The paint is nice.

    But ~$20k for it? Geddafuggouttahere.

    Like 1
  10. Steve B

    My Home Depot hauler is a ’70 Dodge pickup like this. It’s not nearly as nice cosmetically, but runs like a top and I’m never afraid to haul whatever with it. Paid just a couple G’s for it, cheap to insure, no smog tests, simple to work on and has the original big block/4-speed/Dana 60 combo that will tow a house and still get 12 mpg. Perfect for what i use it for. Yes, it rides and drives like a truck. Sweptys are appreciating in value now as well, although this price is pretty enthusiastic.

    Like 1
  11. Tom Driscoll

    Chrysler museum needs this…

    Like 1
    • Marshall

      That’s an even better idea than the idea I suggested earlier about selling it to Hollywood.

  12. Dutch 1960

    “Hey, let’s update next year’s model of the truck by sticking on some aluminum trim on the sides, that has nothing to do with the shapes embossed into the sheet metal!”

  13. Danny

    In image 17 there is over spray on the door hinge, the color of the step well is slightly different than the door frame, there is a slight bit of rust at the bottom of the door. In image 16 there is some slight rust on the corners of the wheel wells and the floor of the bed. These trucks came with G 78 15 tires and most owners replaced these with H 78 15 or even bigger L 78 15. All bias ply, of course. The carrying capacity of the 1/2 tons was a joke. This truck probably cost less then $3,000.00 new. I was considering buying a brand new 1974 Dodge pickup with the extended cab, 3/4 ton. It was list price less than $4,000.00. Instead I bought a used 1971 IH 1310 flatbed for $1,600.00. I still have it today, slight roof damage due to the storm, Katrina. Anyone interested in buying it? Contact me, I might consider selling it after owning it for 41 years. Seems like only yesterday that I bought it.

    Like 1
  14. Mark S Member

    My first thought was 18k are you kidding me 8k would be more realistic, which is what this flipper probably payed for it. The first thing I’d do with this is have a sprayed liner put in the truck bed. Then I’d put on a more attractive rear bumper on it. I’d lightly use it as a weekend go to the lumber store truck. I’d use it sparingly to keep the mileage down and store it indoors. That leaning tower of power under the hood is just fine for what this truck is rated to haul and I wouldn’t change a thing.

    Like 1
  15. jaymes

    cant fix ugly, even gas monkey couldn’t sell theirs. goes to show the survivior cars are something weird or a LRC (low resale color) according to matt garrett. hes always right. it might be worth this in another 20yr though if it stays the same.

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