1929 Model A Sport Coupe With Rumble Seat

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In the 1950s and 1960s, the Ford Model A and other 1930s cars were popular restorations. Eventually, many were parked and no longer driven as the builders aged so many have been sitting for 30 or 40 years. ’50s and ’60s cars are popular now and most cars from earlier just aren’t worth much and can be a real bargain. This 1929 Model A is a good example. It is an older restoration that sat for 30 years before the new owner brought it back to life. He’s had it for two years and has gotten everything working. As a California car there is no rust. It may be worth less than the $12,950 he’s asking here on eBay, but it’s still a bargain I think if you want a fun old car that won’t take much work to maintain.

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Comments

  1. randy

    That seems aweful cheap to me, I remember those being very sought after in a bygone era. Too old for my tastes though, I am a 60’s and 70’s type guy.

  2. Peter Lee

    “Coup?” Do you mean a political overthrow?

  3. blindmarc

    Nice car for someone as a Sunday driver.

  4. francisco

    I believe this is a cabriolet which is neither a coupe nor a roadster. It looks like that roof doesn’t retract. It probably comes off in one piece.

  5. Dan

    I love Model As (family had one, came home from the hospital in one, used to own a ’30 Model A), but I fear this will be one of the first groups of cars these next few years where supply increases (as their owners pass on and their kids don’t want them or want the $ instead) and demand decreases (I am 40 and don’t know of many others who want to own a Model A). Maybe I’ll be wrong.

    Good luck to the seller though. Hope it goes to a good home.

    • Grant

      Dan, I’m with you. I love these things. We are the same age, and personally, I like the trend I see with these. It means it isn’t too far fetched to think about maybe buying one some day. The 65 Mustang I’ve always wanted? Probably not going to happen. Something like this could, though.

      • The Walrus

        In total agreement. I don’t aspire to own a Model A, I wouldn’t mind a model T. Either way, I like many other cars from the 30’s, most of which will stay in the upper echelons of value. However, the minute good-very good examples of these consistently drop below $8K, which isn’t too far off, I’ll be in on the hunt.

  6. jim s

    seller is taking offers on this.

  7. Graham Lloyd

    fransisco, it is a fixed roof. Doesn’t come off. Sports Coupe is the correct name for that body style. Probably one of the rarest body styles. Thankfully not a hot rodder’s choice. Doesn’t take well to a top chop and whacking the roof off makes an awkward looking roadster.

    Around here, at least, the asking price is reasonable. I just sold my 28 AR Sports coupe project for close to my asking price. They’ll no longer be high dollar car, but for simplicity and parts availability, you can never go wrong with an A bone.

    http://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.html?requestSource=b&adId=1068988894

    • francisco

      Thanks for the info., Graham. The cabriolet was more like a tudor sedan, I believe. The owner of a local department store drove one around here many years ago. As a kid, I remember thinking he had to be rich to drive a car like that. Wasn’t there a pickup with a roof like that, too?

      • Dan

        Francisco – there were two pickups 1. Closed cab and 2. Roadster (with a completely removable top)

  8. Chris A.

    Neighbor has a 5 window “A” coupe which is really pretty and a good runner. There is a serious “A” group with a 25 year following called “Secrets of Speed Society” dedicated to hot rodding and restoring “A”s. OHV and 16 valve A engines can now be build. Charlie Yapp in Ohio is the editor of the quarterly publication. Because you can get so many reproduction parts, “A”s can be bought and restored for reasonable money. This is a really nice one at a fair price but will ned some serious going over. Good thing it is on the west coast.

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