4-4-Real? 1969 Olds 442

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With muscle car prices continuing to soar, we’ve seen all sorts of cars that we used to think were complete junk rising from the dead, as current owners seek to cash in. Here we have a 1969 Oldsmobile, claimed by the seller to be “for real” for sale here on craigslist in Connecticut (between Wallingford and Middletown).

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The seller says the car is 99% complete and that he has all the parts not shown in the photos (though I wonder if he has the missing glass.) There are not enough photos in this ad to really know what is going on with this car. The engine is said to be stuck, and we have to assume the interior is not in great shape, as well. The vinyl top looks terrible and there is probably rust in the roof.

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In the early 90’s, I owned a ’69 442 that had spent its entire life in Connecticut. It had low mileage and had been stored winters, but still had a fair amount of rust in the quarters, both front and rear, and especially troubling was the hidden rust behind the rear wheel wells. So the example for sale here looks about average or better for an almost 50-year old GM A-body car that spent its life in the northeast. Even in this rough condition, it seems this car is well worth the seller’s asking price of $2,000. I am guessing it will sell quickly. Restored ’69 442s are getting crazy money these days and they are not and never will be among the most desirable of these cars (unless you have one of the rare W-30 versions).

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Restoring this 442 will require a great deal of time and money, and while the seller says he will part out the car, I do hope someone will rescue it. If the numbers matching claim proves out, this is a car worth saving. The body plate looks right for a 442. While it’s not terribly rare (19,587 hardtop coupes made in 1969), these are wonderful drivers and great cruisers, especially if you don’t mind subsidizing the oil companies. What do you think? Is it worth saving or is this in the end, just a parts car?

You can learn more about 1969 442 specifications and features here.

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Comments

  1. RayT Member

    I see the “4 4 2” on the deck lid. It’s a numbers-matching car!

  2. Howard A Member

    My “go-to” source has quite a few and probably 30 68-69’s. As usual, the prices are all over the place, the cheapest was $17,900, up $50-60, or more, so yeah, they are a lot of money. Again, same old thing, do you put $30g’s ( and several knuckles) into this, and maybe, if you’re lucky, it will be ready by next year, or go and buy one, ( for $30g’s) you can be at the cruise-in tomorrow night. Lot of work here.

  3. MH

    I hope it gets saved. One of my favorite cars.

  4. nessy

    More photos would help but if this is the real deal and it’s complete like he says, there is not a thing to moan about for 2000.

  5. JW454

    Some people look at this hobby a bit differently than I do. In May, I finished my 3 year project. I put more money into it than it would sell for but, at the shows and cruise ins I attend, the people taking the time to admire it ask “Did you build it”? I say “Yes I did”. That’s what makes it worth it to me. So if you’re a true gearhead, the cost isn’t the most important thing. Buy something like this car and do something you’ll be proud of down the road.

    • JW454

      Here’s the before picture.

      • AER

        What was wrong with this?

      • JW454

        Aer,

        Nothing was wrong with it. That’s why I picked it. It just wan’t a convertible… now it is.

      • Marty Member

        JW, I love the before and after photos. I wouldn’t mind seeing a couple of the “during”…

    • nessy

      Is that an early Monte Carlo convertible? First one I have seen. It almost looked like a Chevelle convertible from the side. Did you use the top and upper quarters from a Chevelle? Ah, you just posted your before photo just as I put this comment up. Now I see. It sure is neat. Add the rare optional Monte Carlo skirts and really get everyone wondering what the heck it is.

      • JW454

        Nessy,
        The General never made a M/C convertible but, I’m a convertible guy so, I built my own. Here is the donor car. 1971 Buick Skylark.

    • 56chevyguy

      I love it! A rare custom you can be extremely proud of! ENJOY

  6. nessy

    JW454, I know they never made a Monte Carlo convertible which is why I said it was the first one I have seen. Then I asked you if you used Chevelle parts to make this car. The Buick donor you just showed us used the same basic convertible parts as a Chevelle.

    • JW454

      Nessy,
      All the “A” bodies are simular but, as donors go for this project, the Cutlass is the best one to use, then the Skylark followed by the LeMans and lastly the Chevelle.

      • Marty Member

        JW, why is the Cutlass considered better to use as a donor than the Skylark? The A-body convertible parts are all the same as far as I know.

  7. sparkster

    I have my 69 Cutlass on the market. Not sure I want to sell. In the our family since new. California car

    • Howard A Member

      Hi Sparkster, take it from me, you’ll be sorry. Not sure of the circumstances regarding the sale, and it’s none of our business, but I regret selling my classics every day ( especially when a similar vehicle is shown here) You’ll never be able to replace it, especially one with so many memories. Sell the RV, but please, keep the Cutlass.

  8. sparkster

    Craigslist San Francisco

  9. sparkster

    interior

  10. RoughDiamond

    @sparkster-a good sign “not” to sell is when you are torn between selling and not selling. Please pull it off the market before someone agrees to buy it and you are on the hook to sell it. Once that agreement is made, you either go back on your word (never a good thing) or convince yourself it was time to let it go and that while the family history/memories were nice, you’ll get over them. Trust me from personal experience you won’t. Been there and done that.

  11. HeadMaster1

    Bought a 69 442 Convt for my ex yeas ago. The original 400 was long gone and a built 455 was in its place (very common for 400 cars). It was pretty quick, rode great, handled good, thank to Hotchkiss pieces. Overall a very nice car. My ex rarely drove it as it wasn’t as “airtight” as the new car she was used to……I got rid of the 442 AND the ex, but should have kept he car

  12. Thomas Spelino

    Hi soarkster lo v e your olds mine was arctic white and interior same color as your car it was 69 442 from a serviceman staioned in hawaiiwho brought it new york 225dollars later it was mine decent b o dy n o rust but a bluestone wall toatalled the right side after sterring column. Broke keep your olds if you can.then i had a demon 71 all long gone i miss them good luck buddy Roc

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