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440 And A 4-Speed: 1970 Plymouth GTX

1970 Plymouth GTX

This 1970 Plymouth GTX is a different kind of trailer queen. Having been pulled out of the woods in Chesapeake, Virginia, the car sits on a trailer awaiting someone to take it away. Fifteen bids have been cast to take home this GTX and the price has reached only $3,255 although the reserve has not yet been met. The car comes with a clean title, but no miles are listed and while the VIN is not mentioned in the listing, there is a photo of it. You can find it here on eBay.

1970 Plymouth GTX

Unfortunately, it is easier to describe what this car might have been rather than what it is. It used to cruise around with confidence by a 440 cubic-inch V8 with a 4-speed manual transmission. Not only is all that missing, but so is the Dana 60 rear end, which has been swapped out with an 8.75 inch. The seller says that this car has potential, but I am struggling to see it. There is not much left of this car that might be saved or used in another build. Thankfully the price is reflecting that.

1970 Plymouth GTX

Inside, at one time it had some comfortable bucket seats with a console, but that does not greet you when you open the door now.  They are still there, but they are in very rough shape. Moisture has been working hard on ruining the flooring and carpets. You can see the rust areas on the front floor and the trunk, with the latter having the worst of it. The dash is severely cracked which is has been a long-standing Mopar product problem.

1970 Plymouth GTX

At one time I am sure someone thoroughly enjoyed this 1 of 1471 GTX. However, as time progressed it met an owner who began to neglect it and sadly, it has reached the condition it is in. Now it is displayed in front of numerous people probably wishing it was left to rot rather than be seen like this. Hopefully, you can be the person that will take this Plymouth home. If you hear the Sarah McLachlan music playing in your head right now, you know you’re heading in the right direction.

Comments

  1. Steve R

    It’s rough, but someone might want to take a shot at restoring it. This would have been an attractive and desirable car when new, too bad this is how it ended up.

    I’m glad the seller didn’t include mileage in the ad. If they don’t know it’s better to leave that information blank rather than coming off as shady by including a number from a five digit speedometer which nobody will believe is accurate.

    If anyone bothers to check the sellers other auctions, he has another rusty Mopar which was recently featured on this site.

    Steve R

    Like 4
  2. SMDA

    Amazing,, left to rot as an eyesore, now someone wants a small fortune for it. When will this craziness end? Wonder if the bad neighbor/owner is trying to get rich off it, or if a flipper is trying to make buck. If so, wonder what he paid for it, if anything. I can almost hear the lies spurting out his mouth as he makes his pitch to the “owner”.

    Like 4
    • Chris M.

      Those flippers!!! Not again! An evil crew they are, espousing the old American value of private enterprise with the intent to garner profit!! Police I say!!

      Like 8
      • SMDA

        Flippers refers to the more shady side of the biz, people who lie, cheat, in general take advantage of the less informed. I have nothing against Capitalism as long is it played fairly with some morality and ethics. Too many comment like you, with blanket statements that do not tell the whole story, or perhaps for you, it is your story to tell. Are you a flipper of dubious reputation?

        Like 7
      • Chris M.

        No I am not. And while you make a valid point, its been overstated . It’s to the few, like yourself, who are quick to raise the alert of the supposed countless nefarious crooks who rob ignorant schleps by false advertising. (Insert blanket statement) It’s pretty obvious, at least to many of us, this car isn’t telling any lies nor is the seller. If he bought it for $100 and gasp! flips it! for $10,000 then I say good for him. Perhaps it’s you who was the ill informed soul who blindly fell for a thief selling big shiny car dreams? As always in any case the old and wise saying “buyer beware” applies.

        Like 1
  3. Classic Steel

    Nice to see the plate was removed from the car. I hope it belongs to this one without motor 🥺

    Is this A mopar right of passage to yank them off when possible? I don’t get it !

    Like 2
    • Steve R

      He should have left it on the car, but since it’s only held in place by a couple of Phillips head scews how much does it really matter. As long as there is other documentation present, which there is in the form of the broadcast sheet with a VIN number clearly visible. That should be considered much more important when documenting a car.

      Steve R

      Like 4
      • SMDA

        Okay, unless you try to register it and some other car has that VIN. You might come out okay, but why put up with the hassle?

        Like 2
      • Steve R

        SMDA, what are you talking about? Did you even read what I wrote? I’m referencing documentating the car and how a data plate held on by a couple of screws isn’t as important as a broadcast sheet.

        Steve R

        Like 4
      • SMDA

        Have you ever spent a day at the DMV? Logic makes no matter to them. AS I sad, not worth the hassle, not to mention the great expense.

        Like 2
      • stillrunners stillrunners Member

        The VIN from the under hood data plate…..along with the dash plate is also stamped on the radiator area of that frame and the by the trunk drip rail under neath – in addition that same number would appear on the broadcast sheet – the block – the transmission – and rear end from 1969 on espically on a Dana equipped car….some 1968’s have it as well – like my Formula S 340 car – but not all. Ruff but it’s getting attention.

    • stillrunners stillrunners Member

      they put it by the battery…..go figure

  4. Greg V

    I’ve been watching some of the AMD installation center videos on Youtube lately, interesting watching them bring back rusty wrecks to solid shells. Anyone have any idea what it would cost to have them do that to something like this? Assuming you’d send them the bare shell and they’d do floors, trunk & extensions, outer wheel houses, quarters, dutchman panel, roof and likely a frame rail or two. Just curious. Is it like $20K or closer to $30K? More?

    Always wondered. Seems like this car would need most if not all that.

    Hope someone saves it anyways!

    Greg V.

    Like 5
    • SMDA

      Why would anyone spend money like this? Is it to reap a profit (hopefully) or for the love of the car to keep long term? If the later is the idea, this is going to come close to six figures if you can’t do it yourself, and at least half that if you do. Now, if you enjoy this and have the disposable funds, well, good for you. But……….if you do not, there are far better cars that drive far better at far lower cost. We are free to make our own choices in this grand nation, and that is good, though I fear many are making poor choices.

      Like 1
      • Chris M.

        You’re entertaining! Funny how confounded you are over and old rusty Plymouth.

        Like 1
    • Arthell64 Member

      A few years ago Craig Hopkins (AMD) gave me an price of 15k to do a cuda from the frame rails up. I ended up taking a Chevelle to him and I was very happy with the work and price.

  5. Tom Member

    AS said, what a shame to let a rare cool ride like this fall into ruin.

    Who’s going to step up with me a call the TIME OF DEATH on this one?

    VVVVVV……………………………………………………………….7:58 pm.

    Like 2
  6. Gaspumpchas

    Good commentary, Greg. To anyone who has never done a restoration before, you have no idea what details are involved and the time it takes to do it. I know one unibody guy who just looks at something like this as routine, saw him take a 67 mustang convertible, and start at the right rear and work his way around. Time and materials. if it takes 200 hours and the shop rate is $100 per hour, there’s 20 grand right there. That’s not including expensive materials or parts. It gets up there quickly. Most shops I know will take a down payment, start the work and when the moneys used up, they bill the customer. When the $$$ is used up, the work stops. Paint? We did a Shelby convertible and gallon of Red paint was a grand. then you have all the additives you need to go along with the paint. Liquid Gold!
    Another thing I’d like to add: when you restore a car with replacement panels, its nowhere near as strong or structurely solid. When we got this mustang done, you had to be careful if you pushed it around or where you jacked it up, as it would push the body out of shape–bend the panels or screw up your gaps.
    I have nowhere the experience that a lot of you guys have , so chime right in.. Input is great and another thing that makes BF a super site!
    Hope this answers some of your questions, Greg.
    Cheers
    Greg
    GPC

    Like 6
    • lawrence f kniveton

      200 hours seems light. It takes me 250-300 hours to restore a vintage ski doo, depending on condition. That’s only about seven weeks to show sled status.

      Like 3
  7. SMDA

    I’m surprised the Magnums survived on the car. I recall 40 years ago getting a set from a junked 68. Seems to me I paid the owner something like 5 bucks a wheel. He wanted a little more put it was darn cold (dead of winter) and he didn’t want to stand around haggling. Gosh, I miss the good old days when stuff was cheap and a handy guy in a simple shed out back behind the house could work wonders.

    Like 4
    • Chris M.

      Alas, time waits for no one.

      Like 1
  8. Robert White

    Great find & 115 people are watching this at $3k+ bid right now but the bids are going for another five days yet.

    I predict this GTX will go for north of $20k USD.

    Very restorable classic that I would snap up quick if I had one of those snappy bank accounts.

    Bob

    Like 1
  9. Tom c

    The engine and transmission combo are what made this car so valuable, and they are gone . What’s left of real value on this rusted out pos.

    Like 4
  10. FordGuy1972 FordGuy1972 Member

    I find it very disappointing and somewhat more than a little annoying when I see the listing that states “440 And A 4-Speed: 1970 Plymouth GTX” only to find that the 440 and 4-Speed is long gone. It’s a roller without the very desirable parts that would make this car so special. It’s hard to work up any excitement about this pile of rusted parts. Restoration costs will take all the fun out of this one, not to mention it will never be a numbers matching car. Even if I had the funds, I have no interest in any car that is missing the engine and trans. Spend the money and buy a complete car, you’ll be way ahead in the end.

    Like 4
    • Tempo Matador Ray

      Good follow up comments Gaspumpchas…Breaking cost down in common lay person terminology is the easiest way for individuals to understand where things can end up…If folks can perform a fair amount of work themselves, obviously that will help with keeping the cost within their budgets. Over the years I have worked on several interesting vehicles that some would have walked away from. As I mentioned in earlier posts, I am currently working on a 1950 Tempo Matador purchased out of South America. It has been through a rough existence over the past 60+. However, it has been like automotive archeology working to put this thing back on the road. I love every minute of it…Continue to innovate not duplicate.

      Like 3
  11. Del

    And here we are all madly discussing another candidate for the crusher.😂

    Like 3
  12. George Mattar

    Lawrence is right. I have done several vintage snowmobiles. 5 figures to restore with NOS parts. NOS track was $600 alone. I had a 70 RR with N96 in 1973. Started to rust then. Even if you can cut and weld and do all the work yourself you are looking at $30,000 in parts. Price an interior from Legendary. You can buy a decent used car for that much. This car is junk.

    Like 2
  13. MBorst

    I seen this rolling down the highway a few years ago (3) . I’m thinking it is a convertible roadrunner but could be wrong. I know I wanted it !
    https://photos.app.goo.gl/sANmbGAto4enJRbE9

    Like 1
    • moosie moosie

      By the tail lights its a ’68 so its not a Road Runner, it could be a GTX or a Satellite. Road Runner convertibles were ’69 only.

      Like 2
  14. GTO MAN 455

    its a shame but its to far gone, unless you got deep pockets

    Like 2
  15. Mopar_man

    It’s at 4k and reserve still isn’t met, why do people think rust buckets like this are worth a premium?

    • moosie moosie

      Mopar man, Because there’s an a$$ for every seat .

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