Aw, Shucks! 1915 Model T Panel Delivery Truck

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This Model T panel delivery truck comes with quite a story. Stored in a warehouse only six years after it was new, the vehicle remains with the original family that purchased it in 1915 to transport oysters. It has received a mechanical refurbishment but the body has been left beautifully alone! It’s located in Newport News, Virginia and is listed for sale here on eBay with a buy it now of $50,000 and bidding starting at $40,000 without a reserve.

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Here’s a picture of the Model T as it was “rediscovered.” I’m hoping the gentleman to the right is the person mentioned in the display board shown below.

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The board also details the body-off refurbishment that was done on the car. The engine was rebuilt and it looks as if the work was done to a very high standard.

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One of the attractions of this T is the original gilt lettering on the sides. I so hope that the new owner doesn’t “restore” the truck any further!

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As you can see from this shot, the work seems to have been done to a high standard. It’s so charming! My question is whether or not the charm is worth the entry fee. What do you think?

 

 

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Comments

  1. Jeff

    Well, it is very nice, but I think it’s priced a bit above market here.

    Like 1
    • brakeservo

      It’s priced Way above the eBay market! Where you gonna drive it other than a parade? Too slow, under braked, fragile and dangerous.

      Like 1
  2. Brad C

    A Hollywood studio could afford to buy it and just leave as is. It already feels like a movie prop!

  3. JW

    I would leave as is but I would have to change the lettering to something related to my family. But no worries because it’s out of my price range.

  4. Francisco

    Id start by pulling the body off the frame so that the frame and everything on it can be modernized. 350cid crate motor with all the goodies on it for it to be a turn key fuelie, 700r4 trans, Dana 60 rear axle, and double A arm front suspension to get things started. Original wire wheels could be used I guess but I’d go with new after market wires for safety at higher speeds. Finally 4 wheel disc brakes would be a must as for the body I’d restore to a stoke appearance with revised lighting so you can see at night in modern day traffic. Last but not least a Ful on custom leather interior 4 high back custom seats. console with all the trimmings. Now we’re talking about a one hundred K + car that can meet the demands of our roads today.

    • grant

      Blasphemy!!!!! There are plenty of repro bodies to cut up and put the wrong drivetrain in. This should be left perfectly as is. It isn’t a car anymore, it’s a historical artifact.

      Like 2
      • Neal

        Sad, but if it’s your money you could do whatever you’d want. Hope you wouldn’t,though.

        Like 1
    • mr. skiles

      4 high back buckets… lol the 70’s are over!

      • David Frank David Frank Member

        And just where is he going to put those other 2 seats?

    • peter

      Francisco, your suggested mods are so great that you would have almost nothing original left. Wouldn’t it be easier to get a Corvette or similar and build a new (old) body on it and then keep this car as an example of our heritage?

      Like 2
    • Richard Love

      You are getting the reactions you are fishing for. Hooked a number of ’em.
      Dick

      Like 1
    • jaygryph

      GUYS YOU ARE BEING TROLLED.

      Seriously, this is a cut and paste from the earlier massively downvoted comment over here. They are, as they say, getting your goat on this…over and over.

      http://barnfinds.com/faded-glory-1931-packard-833-coupe/#comments

      Read the most down voted comment on that link. It’s a word for word copy and paste.

      Every time this shows up people freak out, and are had. It has all the buzz words to annoy people.

      The people moderating this may want to do something about it.

      Like 1
    • Francisco

      This was meant to be a joke. I didn’t think anyone would seriously consider such an atrocious modification to a beautiful 100 year old Model T. Apparently 47 people believed it, and the joke backfired. Sorry guys. I’ll shut up for a while. Yes, I did cut and paste it from a recent post about a wonderful old Packard. I thought that was a joke too, or I would never have reprinted it. I guess it wasn’t. Sorry again.

      • mr. skiles

        This is how you joke now.. ;-) or :-) … lol… i know people that would/have done what you said! Dont laugh… its not funny… :-)

        Like 1
      • grant

        No need for apologies and I hope you didn’t take my reply as an affront. I too know people who would do just that. I love the dialog I have with others on this site.

      • Francisco

        Grant. Thank God more people think like you, and repudiate my (jokingly sarcastic) suggestions to mutilate any beautifully preserved car such as this one. I own a 1930 Model A pickup. I am its third owner since new, and believe it or not, its second owner is still living. He’s a gentleman in his mid 90’s, and more than once he suggested I update it with a flathead 8, and add “juice” brakes. He also said that if I did that, could he have the aftermarket Autolite cabin heater back which he bought back in the 40’s. Of course I’m keeping the truck original. I use it regularly to transport firewood, wine barrels, and manure for my garden. I’m the last of my family so I don’t know where it will go after I’m gone. It will become a rat rod ‘over my dead body.’

  5. Blindmarc

    Jay Leno, where are you? A rare piece for sure.

    • waynard

      Why does everyone immediately pick on Jay Leno to go buy something? Jeez, get a new line already.

      It’s a shame this owner chose to go as far as he did, then stop. He’s already altered it beyond any originality and historical value. Though I certainly would not agree with the doofus above who wants to radicalize it.

      Like 1
  6. geomechs geomechs Member

    I really like this one. Unfortunately it’s way out of my budget. I sure hope that the buyer keeps it as is. When the original lettering is in this good of shape, it’s best to preserve what you’ve got and enjoy it as it is. I will say that if something like this ever made it to my place, I’d have it out on the road as often as possible. It’s a great car and it doesn’t do it any good leaving it in the garage….

  7. Rocko

    Stinky junk!

    • peter

      Rocko, I hope you said that as a joke. Certainly vintage and veteran cars are pre-historic compared to modern muscle cars but if you look past the chrome and loud exhaust noise you should try to appreciate the beauty of the design and the efforts these manufacturers went to overcome metallurgical, suspension, lubrication and cooling problems etc. plus then add some little engineering niceties to be ‘one-above’ their competition. Also, until you drive and old car especially one with two wheel brakes; no shock absorbers; no power anything; a limited engine rev range; and, no-synchromesh, you will never be able to appreciate the skill of our forebear men and women.

      Also, you must not forget what our roads were like. I purchased my 1932 DM Dodge from its second owner who purchased it in 1935. I live in Australia and I remember him telling me he had to purchase a new set of four tyres after driving only a 120 miles and that was on our second major highway (if you could call it that). The roads were made from rough sharp ‘blue metal’ rock that splits like a pre-historic stone age axe head. Imagine how far a modern car with 30-series tyres would get

  8. Jumping g

    Too much sentimental attachment to the truck . shows in the astronomical asking price . Keep it in the family and pass it on to the grandkids.

  9. Bruce

    That old box needs to stay just the way it is. It’s PERFECT…..

  10. Mike Burnett

    Ooooh, the patina! Oh, hope the smell of oysters has gone! Ouch, the price!

  11. charlie Member

    Ford museum in Dearborn. Petersen’s two Model T’s have nothing on this one. Most of the cars seen here are drivers, once in a while, a museum piece, and this is one. And if you have ridden in, let alone driven, a Model T, there are not many places outside parades you would want to drive one. Maybe a dirt road, for which they were designed, at about 15 to 20 mph.

  12. Dan

    I love Model As, but demand for them is sinking. There is even less demand for Model Ts, even awesome ones like this one.

  13. roundhouse

    Very nice vehicle but vastly overpriced. Should sell in the 20 – 25k range. Leave it as is, it is beautiful.

  14. That Guy

    Based on the old photos I am guessing the restoration was done sometime in the 1980’s. I’m impressed they had the foresight to leave the body untouched; that wasn’t the norm back then and it was a good choice. But all the price comments are right on. The market for this just isn’t what it once was, and it clearly has family heirloom value to the seller which it won’t to anyone else.

  15. Julian

    Is 101 years with the same family a world record for a motor vehicle? I would think it’s right up there.

    • mr. skiles

      It’s gotta be close! I wish my grandfather had kept his 1929 Erskine coupe! :-( first car he bought.

    • David meichelbock

      If I was in that family I would keep it one of my great uncle had one when I was a young boy he would bring it to our family reunion in Griffith park in Los Angeles and we would cruse the park in it sad to say don’t know what ever happened to it now but we had a lot of fun with it wish it was still in our family because I’d do the same with my generation then pass it on

  16. Tara

    Who ever buys this will find out that they will never get back what they have paid for it.

  17. CanAm

    Ummmmm..purchase 1915 and put into storage 1921 and it has no tires, major (full panel) paint missing………??????

    • Bill McCoskey

      CanAm – Old lacquer paint will flake off in huge chunks once it has dried out & begun to shrink. The paint on the hood panels was not cared for over a time frame approaching 100 years, Not surprised it’s flaking off.

      Now about missing tires. I would not be surprised if the owner was being patriotic during WW2, or pressured into donating the old tires to the used rubber scrap drives in 1944 & 1945. By that time the tires would be worthless except for recycling.

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