Corvette-Powered: Lamborghini Countach Replica

For years, I barely paid attention to replicas of desirable supercars and sports models. Most of the time, it was not due to any particular elitism or judgment, but because the replica itself was so terribly constructed. I’ve never understood why some owners go through the effort of building one just to bolt it to a chassis that will never come close to mimicking the proportions of the real thing. But I’ve come around to replicas executed at a higher level, such as this very nicely detailed Lamborghini Countach replica listed here on eBay for a staggering $267,500 – but given how closely it mimics the original, is it worth it?

Now, I know right off the bat many of you will say there’s no way in heck you’d justify spending close to $300,000 for anything other than an actual Lamborghini. But with preserved Countach 5000s selling at auction for a half-million or more, a painstakingly created replica may, in fact, represent good value for those with the means to buy the best copycat available. While most Countach kit cars look fake from a mile away, the Lamborghini replica seen here made me look very closely at the photos more than once to confirm I wasn’t discounting a real car as a fake. The details may be huge to a Countach connoisseur, but for a generalist like myself, this replica is surprisingly accurate.

The interior is perhaps the most surprising, as most kit car creators spend 90 percent of their efforts on the visual elements and a shockingly low amount of time making the cabin look anything like the real deal. Not here – from the seats to the center console to the orientation of the dash and gauge cluster, the original builder of this Countach did attempt to mimic the Lamborghini-built example. Even the door panels are custom built for this car, with small differences like the window cranks not appearing in the center of a speaker cover, and the seat belt receptacle clearly being from a mass-production car (yes, the authentic Countach’s receptacles have a distinctive button.)

While I’m sure up close there are any number of panel gaps and details that are a few degrees off, they’re not readily apparent in the photos. The fender flares, split-pane windows, and staggered wheels are all examples of custom touches – not off the shelf pieces from a Fiero or a Beetle – that a builder would have to fabricate or otherwise source exacting copies of to sell a replica at a high price point. The only detail that’s off by a fair amount is the powerplant, which the seller refers to as a 350 from a Chevy Corvette. While it’s not exactly exotic, it will be dirt cheap to maintain – all while wrapped in a body that’s anything but bargain basement. If this Countach replica was considered the best ever made, would you pay the asking price?

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Comments

  1. Moparman Member

    It always amused me to see a Fiero based knock off. One look inside gave it away. This, however, really looks good! Still can’t afford it, though, LOL!! :-)

    Like 6
  2. GuernseyPagoda Member

    Admittedly, I am out of the loop on my Lambo prices, however over 1/4 million dollars for a “knock off”, sure seems a bit excessive.

    Like 22
  3. MattR Member

    If I was going to buy a replica Countach, I would attempt to buy this hand-built one with a Cleveland 351: https://www.obsev.com/life/man-built-a-lamborghini-in-his-basement/ It’s a long read but well worth your time. :)

    Like 3
  4. Argy

    And it’s an automatic! Finally, a Countach that can handle rush hour traffic…

    Like 6
  5. Shaggin’ Wagon

    Is there a chance this is a real Lamborghini with an engine transplant? The extremely short listing said nothing about it being a replica. (I went to it hoping to see what transmission they were using)

    Like 5
  6. Mike

    Pretty good copy. I wouldn’t be surprised in the future with 3D printing and all, you could buy something only an expert could ID as fake.

    Like 1
  7. Malcolm Boyes

    Totally lost on me…like “Porsche” badges on a “Speedster” dune buggy and a fake Rolex. Think what cool real car you could buy for that $$$. I’d rather have the BRAT!

    Like 4
  8. ChingaTrailer

    To a rational person, no replica is ever worth more than the cost to snap out another. . . minus a factor for depreciation too. If this is a genuine Countach then one must consider the cost of a correct example and deduct the cost to repair/restore this one. Then you have it’s value.

    Like 2
  9. Dave Peterson

    I have to admit that I have actually researched Daytona/Corvette replica constructs. I was the fortunate driver of the real thing for a short period of time in 1979. My task was to get a wholesale bid for the Ferrari to facilitate a transaction. Any tentative interest was reason enough to drive that wonderful V12. I think I put close to 3000 miles on it. Anyway, I saw a McBurnie advertised and had to look. Never approach those cars in that order. The power steering and automatic transmission is too jarring a disparity. By the way, my best bid on what is now a million dollar car? $19,000, and Kjell only bid that as a favor to my Father for previous help with SAAB. I still think of Charlie Voth and Bob Bettger and smile as they tolerated a young rookie’s foibles without condemnation. End of my feeble attempt at name dropping.

    Like 4
  10. Malcolm Boyes

    The more I look at this and read the ad I believe its a real Lambo but with a Corvette motor..if it is a replica the seller should be sued for misrepresentation! Still not my “cup of tea”

    Like 1
  11. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    The AutoCheck right there in the listing calls it a “Starcraft” with 127K miles.

    Like 2
  12. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    Picture

    Like 1
  13. Simpson

    Looks like a kit. That or someone had a real Lambo from back in the day when they were in inexpensive and totally butchered it. Has GM steering column. Lamborghini did not have speakers like that either. No shots of the undercarriage or of the engine compartment which would show the space frame. I’m guessing the guy is a scammer, looking for a sucker.

  14. PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

    Not sure why everyone keeps posting that this isn’t a real Lambo. That has already been established.
    I posted that it is listed on AutoCheck as a StarCraft.

    Please read the previous Comments before making a Comment.

    Like 2
    • PRA4SNW PRA4SNW Member

      I have no comment about the above comment.

      Like 1
  15. MBorst

    Over $200g🤣🤣🤣 wth for an imposter, no matter how good it looks to the real thing. NO WAY ! His name is on the end of my tongue.. the rock star with the big mouth royally screwed up the National Anthem in Florida at the super bowl. Yeah, you know the guy. He sold an original with very low miles at the Big auction (can’t think right now). In Arizona , BARRETT AUCTION. If I remember her only got little over $200,g for his and it was all going to a fund raiser ! And his was REAL !
    He

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