Daily Driver: 1972 Pontiac Grand Prix 400

The 2nd Generation of the Pontiac Grand Prix was introduced in 1969 and remained in production until the end of the 1972 model year. This Grand Prix is from that final year of production and appears to be a tidy survivor. The owner claims that it has a genuine 62,600 miles on the clock. If this claim is accurate, that means that this is a classic that should be capable of providing many years of classic motoring enjoyment. I have to say a big thank you to Barn Finder local_sheriff for spotting the Pontiac for us. It is located in San Fernando, California, and has been listed for sale here on Craigslist. The sale price has been set at $11,900 OBO.

The owner only supplies photos of one side of the Pontiac, which’s a little bit frustrating. It makes it harder to make a definitive call on the vehicle’s overall condition. However, the panels do look straight, and there is no visible evidence of any rust problems. It also isn’t clear whether the Cinnamon Bronze paint is original or whether the Grand Prix has undergone a repaint at some point. The paint appears to be a bit patchy in a few spots and looks to be developing a matte appearance in others. I suspect that a repaint will be on the cards if the car is going to present at its best once again. On a more positive note, the chrome seems to be complete and in good condition, and there are no issues with the glass. The Pontiac rolls on a set of 15″ Rally II wheels, and there aren’t any apparent faults with these.

Powering the Grand Prix is a 400ci V8, while the vehicle also features a 3-speed Hydramatic transmission, power steering, and power brakes. This is a numbers-matching classic, and it appears that it is in sound mechanical health. The V8 should be capable of producing 250hp, which is enough to have the Pontiac scooting through the ¼ mile in an even 16 seconds. The car has recently received new KYB shocks on all corners, while I can also spy a shiny new master cylinder. The owner refers to the Grand Prix as a turn-key daily driver, meaning it is ready to be enjoyed immediately. He states that the vehicle has covered a genuine 62,600 miles, but it isn’t clear whether this can be verified. Included with the Grand Prix is the original Build Sheet.

The interior of the Grand Prix looks quite serviceable, but there may be a few issues that might need to be addressed. The photo quality leaves a bit to be desired, so some problems could have a question mark hanging over them. The rear seat is a case in point. It appears to have a tear in it, and the upholstery doesn’t seem to match the front bucket seats. I’m not sure whether this is a fact or an illusion. The same is true of the passenger-side door trim. It looks dirty in the photo, but this could be an illusion brought on by the photo’s quality. There is some damage to the lid on the console, but the rest of the console, the dash, and the carpet all appear to be in good condition. I can’t spot any aftermarket additions, but the Pontiac does come equipped with air conditioning, power windows, and a tilt wheel.

At face value, this 1972 Pontiac Grand Prix is a promising find. It appears to be a rust-free survivor that might not require a lot of work to really sparkle. However, it is also a car that perfectly demonstrates the need to personally inspect a classic car before handing over the cash. There are some potential issues here, but determining which ones are real and which are flaws in the photos is difficult to say with any conviction. If I were considering purchasing this classic, I would probably contact the owner to see if he could supply some better photos, especially of the areas that I have identified. They might not only allay some fears but help to clarify whether an inspection is worthwhile. What do you think?

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Comments

  1. RetroRick

    Caught my eye and well worth the read. I’ve always been a fan of this generation of Grand Prix. The original 69 did it best.

    Like 20
    • bry593

      Boat Tail Pontiac – Ohhhhh Yay-yahhhhhhh!!!!! <- You have to say that like the Kool-Aid man….

      Like 5
    • Alan L Johnson

      I had a 69,wish I still had it now.

  2. Jcs

    At first blush she appears to be a pretty solid runner that may clean up well. The price is not unreasonable. If close I would pocket 80 $100 bills and check her out. You never know.

    Like 5
  3. Chunk Plepgeat

    With a cam and bolt-ons, that motor is good for 420 hp and 440 lb/ft of torque.

    Like 2
    • RayZ

      Only of you’re bolting on a turbo or supercharger

  4. Phlathead Phil

    Not too shab, and SMOG exempt for the Cali crowd.

    Like 2
    • Steve R

      Testing exempt, in California, for now. Not many people think that is going to last much longer.

      Steve R

  5. Moparman Member

    Sharp car. Needs the trim rings for the Rally II’s.

    Like 3
  6. ADM

    The ’73’s didn’t look bad, either, but after that, the really good styling was done.

  7. morrisangelo

    Someone here should buy my survivor 1971 Hurst SSJ Grand Prix that I’m selling…

    Like 7
    • ADM

      Well, you could put it in the classified section.

      Like 10
  8. Goatsnvairs

    7K3 cylinder heads on this one, some of the last good big valve Pontiac heads. Just need to tap them for the extra bolt hole for headers. Always liked the GP’s of this era.

    Like 4
  9. Patrick Curran

    The 1969 to 1972 GP’s are a personal favorite. Once GM did away with true two door hardtop bodies and the Feds hung the cow catcher bumpers on cars, it was all over for me.
    This car seems to be straight. These were nice cruisers.

    Like 6
  10. 370zpp

    Wondering if that paint might just “buff out” to a better shine.
    Buckets, console, no vinyl roof, there is a lot to like here.

    Like 5
  11. Mike

    That car has been for sale for at least 3 years that I know of…started out at 9k….I think he’s enlisted the help of a service to sell it…
    No such thing as cinnamon bronze, that is Anaconda Gold….I should be all over this car, and only a few hundred miles away…

    • ADM

      Well, you only die once. Go for it!

  12. Lance Platt

    Beautifully styled coupe. GM makes the Camaro but nothing in the personal luxury class by any manufacturer. Air conditioning and power windows were only found on luxury cars back in the day. The Grand Prix successfully married a luxury car to a stretched sporty intermediate chassis. I know the engine can be modified or turbocharged or supercharged but it’s best kept original. A GTO was lighter and had the shorter wheelbase and shorter hood; the GP had a totally different mission for Pontiac. The advertised car is far from perfect but after 48 years still would turn heads at car shows and cruises.

    Like 3

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