Faked by Flares: 1983 Trans Am Greenwood Edition

00F0F_iqwmAnTgVxc_600x450

I wonder if Barn Finds reader Blaine D. knew when he sent in this Trans Am Greenwood edition here on craigslist that he’d be starting a potential firestorm. We’re the gasoline and he’s the match, so to speak. Over the years, I’ve accumulated some basic background knowledge on the Greenwood Corvettes and even found out an acquaintance of mine has a close family connection to the Greenwood organization. That’s why I’m going to cast some doubt on this 1983 Trans Am with what amounts to a body kit and rear window louvers with the “Greenwood” name on the doors.
00s0s_lyAv41Qpskd_600x450

Now, look: if you’re not a car person and you drag a vehicle out of storage due to a friend or relative passing away, I can see how a quick look on Google could lead the uninformed to think the mere presence of the word “Greenwood” indicates a connection to the storied organization. But there’s next to no information associating Pontiac’s Firebird and Trans Am models with the Greenwood company, not even in the form of a replica bodykit offered by an unknown aftermarket customizer. However, my curiosity got the better of me and I kept digging. One thing is for sure: Camaro and Mustang owners of this generation like the idea of widebody kits and there’s plenty of message board chatter about the best options out there.

firebird (1)
Image courtesy of http://the-stickman.tripod.com/

What we see here is the original IMSA-style body kit offered in the 80’s to a range of Pontiac models including the Trans Am and the  Fiero. It was also a popular look for import brands as well, with the likes of the RX7 and 914 sporting the widebody look to fit massive tires inside the wheel wells. I can’t be sure but I think our fake Greenwood car is wearing one of these kits – the angles of the side skirts in front of the rear fender and behind the fronts looks correct to me. This car here, known as the Superduke, does sport flared fenders but not the same as the Greenwood car. But fenders are often a personal choice for owners, so it wouldn’t surprise me if the car in the craigslist ad is wearing some homemade arches.

imsa
Image courtesy of speedhunters.com

Well, I’ll be the first to admit I didn’t solve the mystery of the Greenwood Trans Am today. But it did give me an excuse to gawk at the IMSA cars that dominated tracks in the 80s, like this Pontiac Firebird IMSA GTO campaigned by the legendary Dyson team (fun fact: Dyson is from my hometown in upstate New York). These cars rocked fender flares and other aero enhancements with a legitimate purpose in mind, unlike this craigslist oddball. Now, for the fun part: what do you think this car’s history is? Am I overthinking its origins? And do you remember this kit from the 1980s being a popular modification for Camaro and Firebird owners? Let us know in the comments below.

WANT ADS

WANTED 1969 Ford Mustang Wanted 1969 Big block mustang, any condition considered Contact

WANTED 1976 Dodge Colt ISO any condition 2 door 4spd preferred complete car. Located in FL will travel. Contact

WANTED 1968-1977 Ford Bronco Have all their parts. Running engine or rust free not necessary. Prefer southern US Contact

WANTED 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 3.5 cabriolet I am looking to buy foreign classic car projects Barnfinds call adam (203)-507-7900 Contact

WANTED 70 71 Chevrolet MonteCarlo Contact

Submit Your Want Ad

Comments

  1. Blindmarc

    There’s no such thing. I love the imsa cars of all flavors, but the vette kits were the pinnacle for greenwood.

    • Jerry

      When I was a kid my father bought a Greenwood t/a brand new in Washington state above seattle and I still have pictures of it. It looks just like the one in the picture except my father painted it red below the Greenwood all the way around and also painted the iroc rims. Just to say when he bought it there he was told that only 2 were made in the US. Thanks for reading. Jerry from Washington also photo of car was taken in 1986

  2. Joe Nose

    I certainly remember the Monza having this sort of kit. Not that my 76 had it; with the Iron Puke in it (Vega origin predecessor) it would have been as stupid as a Versa or Sentra with a case of the gluons.

  3. PaulG

    Love the line in the ad: “You can’t find another one of these” Yeah, we know why…

  4. piper62j

    I really don’t recall these mods.. It’s probably someones’ wannabe..
    Nice find, good car to bring back to stock Firebird credentials.. A phony like this may not be worth much more..

  5. Cleric

    I thought modifications were supposed to add value to a car?

  6. roger

    I like car.Looks COOL

  7. RFenton

    Greenwood was a PONTIAC dealer in Downey CA who made Special Edition cars replicating the smokes and the bandit cars of the 80’s. The Greenwood S/E was designed by Robert Fenton who was a partner and GM of the dealership. Greenwood sold about 100 of the SE cars in various colors, however black was the most popular.

    Like 2
    • JC

      My Uncle bought one and gave it to my Mom. This was the fist car I ever drove, loved it. It had full touching T-Tops. My Dad was scared I was going to kill my self driving it so, he sold it. Trying to find her now.

      Awesome picture!!!

  8. piper62j

    Cleric.. Mods only add value to a vehicle if there is a demand for them.. In this case, the mods never really took hold.

    • R. Fenton

      Any time a dealer can sell over 100 new vehicles that were modified to look like the above photo, I don’t think you can say “never took hold”. That car represents approximately $3.5 million dollars of sales. It was a giant hit in its day. People drove from all over CA. to get one.

      Like 1
      • R. Fenton

        I would just like to add that the cars up top with the “Greenwood” on them were early versions of the black cars development. All were done by Greenwood Pontiac in Downey, CA and had nothing to do with the corvette people.

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks.

Become a member to add images to your comments.

*

Keep me in the conversation via email. Or subscribe without commenting.