Going Dutch: 1983 Porsche 911 Police Car

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While police on this side of the world rely heavily on V8 power and large sedan bodies, other parts of the universe deployed high-powered sports cars for high-speed highway pursuits. It’s not entirely different than from when various states used Camaros or Mustangs, but in overseas markets it wasn’t a short-lived experiment. This 1983 Porsche 911SC police car here on Hemmings.com is a preserved example of one of Europe’s exotic enforcers.

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As you might imagine, it was a hotly contested position to be on the police staff that got to use these vehicles for patrol duties. There was a special unit known as Algemene Verkeers Dienst, or AVD, that got to occupy the driver’s seat. The 911’s essentially were the same as the showroom version mechanically, and the interiors didn’t differ too much aside from the requisite police radio and controls for operating the lights and siren. These earlier model 911s lived with a non-G50 manual ‘box, so it takes some skill to drive quickly.

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The police-issue 911s favored the targa-style design, mainly for its better visibility and allowing officers to stand up when stopped to give directions or scan the roadway ahead. Of course, my mind immediately wanders to the prospect of pushing the targa top off at speed so your co-pilot can fire away at the convicts ahead of you, but that probably wouldn’t be looked upon favorably by other motorists. This example is said to be highly original and recently imported, but no word on the engine health or maintenance history.

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As you can see, the 911 wears its targa-bar mounted siren and special body graphics. It also received desirable OEM goodies like a first aid kit, siren, auxiliary lighting, the rear stop sign seen here – it’s an Porsche purist’s dream car. Those bits are pricey to acquire today, as some restorers who bought an ex-police car have found out. That may be why the asking price is a hefty $199,500 for the rare police Porsche, which may keep it limited to folks with Jerry Seinfeld-like levels of income.

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Comments

  1. Dave Wright

    These were a fairly common sight in Germany, Holland and Belgium in the early 80’s. The French used Citroens, used to see them smoking on the side of the road a lot.

    • Rspcharger Rspcharger

      The car smoking or the officers?

  2. Robert Stoll

    …..deployed high-powered sports cars for high-speed highway pursuits.

    No, highway pursuits have always been very rare events in Europe, especially in the Netherlands. It is easier and safer to block the road somewhat further on.
    Rather, the power was employed to patrol at higher speeds than the common traffic (160 km/h against 120 Km/h), in order to observe road behaviour and to avoid that people slowed down in order to keep aback of the police and thus not being seen. Range Rovers were also used.

  3. Dairymen

    When they pull you over in the Netherlands the police car drives in front of you and a light sign that says “stop” turns on and you pull over. Only well connected criminals have guns there, so getting shot at wasnt likely back in the day.

  4. CelestialGryphon

    This is cool. It gets all the points in my books.

  5. Ricocher

    They used to drive them without the Targa top, summer & winter. To stay warm they would wear thick white sheepskin coats & a white helmet. My brother bought an ex-highway patrol Porsche in the 70s. The interior was stuffed, but the Targa top was like new.

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