K-Code Fastback: 1966 Mustang GT

1966 Mustang Fastback

Aside from the Shelby variants, this Mustang could have one of the most desirable spec sheets around – ’66 fastback body, K-code engine, and 4-speed toploader transmission. It doesn’t get much better than this! The “K” in the VIN proves that this car came from the factory with the high performance version of Ford’s 289 V8. It didnt come from the factory with the scoops or white paint though so those may have to go. Then again, the the engine does run so I’d be tempted to just fix the floors, replace that hideous velvet interior, and go through the mechanicals. Then I’d be able to enjoy the car sooner and not risk the possibility of not getting it back together after tearing it all apart. There is something enduring about a beater Mustang. Take a close look here on eBay and let us know what you’d do with it!

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Comments

  1. Casey

    Wow those frame rails in the back are toast. Definitely need dynacorn on speed dial, be prepared to replace everything underneath this one. Unfortunately this will require major surgery to be a safe driver.

    On the hi-po motors the vin is supposedly stamped on the block unlike lesser 289s, so originality should be easy to confirm. The clatter of the solid lifter valve train on these at full gallop is a wonderful cacophony.

    Worth restoration for sure, but be prepared to repair/replace the entire unibody.

  2. Dairymen

    Nice & rare find! But how many mice were slaughtered to supply enough fur for the interior?

  3. Woodie Man

    I agree with Casey that poor pony has rusted OUT. Its going to be an expensive proposition….if it was me I find one that was original, unrusted and without the velour! But then I’m firmly in the camp of “buying the best original condition at the cheapest price” Oops wait a minute this might be it.

    Like 1
  4. Crazydave

    Don’t mind (much) the hood scoop, but those (dummy) brake cooling scoops on the sides have gotta go. As for that inferior interior……. (Blech)

    Otherwise change & flush all fluids and enjoy it!

    I wouldn’t call it a beater – but the price – approaching 20K as I write this – well – too much for me to consider for it! Rusty? Yes, but I’ve seen a lot of worse in daily driver use

  5. Casey

    @crazydave it’s all fun and games until the rear end falls off :)

    • Alan (Michigan)

      +1.
      Viewers should note that the car was supported in the rear by the traction bar bumpers at the front of the leaf springs in order to get the photographs on a lift. Dicey.
      If the mounts which locate and hold the springs are rotted (and they certainly appear to be), then the springs could rip off of the Mustang at any time. Not a safe car to drive in its’ current condition!
      The appearance to me is of a car which sat over a source of dampness, such as a dirt floor garage/barn for a LONG time.

  6. JW454

    That is one rusty hobby horse. That interior was a late 70’s early 80s thing. I helped put a few of those in cars. Mostly hot rods but there were a few of 60’s cars in the bunch too.

  7. Rocco

    The drive train looks correct with the heads and crank balancer, it’s missing the dual point distributor. Someone installed ’75 electronic distributor. This brings back some memories when I lived in Ohio with my Rustangs and Shelby’s. It’s too bad this classic ended up this way. To much work and $$$ for this old dog.

  8. snerd

    is it me or is that rear dual exhaust valance panel on the front?

    • Donnie

      snerd there is something odd abought the front valance I looked on Wikipedia 65 to 66 mustangs could not find any front valance like that

    • Mike H. Mike H

      It looks as though maybe the cut holes in the front valence and added fog lamps there at some point? The rear valences that had the exhaust cut-outs had smaller homes and they weren’t that close to the center.

  9. JW

    It would be a nice to car to restore back to a original driver car but for that price and the work needed it’s over priced already. Too bad because it is a desirable car to own. I’m a modifier from the days this car rolled off the assembly line but never would I do what has been done to that interior. YUCK !!!

  10. Gnrdude

    Hmnnnn, Ashamed the Outer Body Seems to have only minimal Rust problems but the Floor Pans and Under-body are Toast. Better Have a Welder and a Sheet-metal man on Speed dial if take this one on as a project.

  11. Steve

    Someone has to save this car, it could be an awesome ride.

  12. Rancho Bella

    K code and Boss 302 Mustangs are my favorite road beasts.

    This is such a pile even I wouldn’t get involved. And trust me, I’ve done some reeeeel dumb things.

  13. Barzini

    How problematic is a missing door tag that was removed and lost when the paint work was done? it seems like it could be an issue.

  14. Gary I

    Rust has had its way with this car for a long time. The trunk and floor pans are shot and a full replacement of both will run $8,000 to $10,000 at a shop. I have a 65 Cutlass that no shop in town would give a reasonable price on for a floor and trunk pan so I did it myself, never again! Cars with solid floor and trunk pans should be worth ten thousand over a rotten project car any day. I will never waist my time and energy on a full replacement again, not to only have a solid car worth little more than when I started after months of time and energy. Nobody appreciates the amount of work it takes to do them correctly. I will only seek out and save cars with a history of being taken care of, or at least kept dry.

    • PAW

      Hmm, Let me calculate with Dynacorn parts trough Ponyparts;
      – Frame rails 2x$284
      – Trunk floor $456
      – Let me throw $1000 for any additional parts that would be needed
      That is $2000 in parts

      That would leave average of referred cost of labor $9000- $2000 for parts i.e. $7000

      With average 40 hours in working week (which is enough for floor panel change in a shop with average competences and equipment) this would leave $175 as hourly rate.

      Anyone paying $175/hour for a job of this level of competences required should have a close and careful look into the mirror.

      And yes, I have my 1970 Boss 302 in top quality body shop and I pay $80/hour for labor. So I talk from my own experience

      • Keith

        Agreed PAW, if you’re paying $10k to have floor pans and trunk floor replaced……yikes.

  15. Frankie

    Yeah, the rust has taken its toll, I saw the bidding was at $19,000, must be a blind person bidding. Love the car otherwise, you can drive it and not worry about dings from shopping carts, other car doors, you could actually enjoy driving it. I’ve been a fool before when buying a car, but not this big of a fool.

  16. MikeW

    Oh no, a East coast car with lots of rust. No quarter vents. The value must be in the K code. https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/classicmustang/info

  17. John

    Someone must have a better body sitting that needs a better vin plate!

  18. S.Brodie

    All your getting is the numbers. A K code engine was never painted Blue at the factory so unless this has been rebuilt it’s probably just a 225HP 289. While there are a zillion parts available for this car just the numbers don’t rate a 20,000 dollar bid. So you have to rebody and throw away virtually everything and probably find a proper K engine. Why? What are you saving?

    • Rocco

      Ford stopped painting engines black in late ’65. All V-8’s were Ford Blue in ’66. This is a ’66, so it is correct. But it is 50 yrs. old, anyone could have painted an eng. BTW, it does have the correct heads and harmonic balancer for a K code eng.

  19. Jim

    K-code is great but Ford made a bunch of them, why go nuts on a perfect restoration? I’m shocked someone paid $19,700 for this $7,000 car, I’ve done a few mustangs like this, it’s a lot of hours to replace all the sheet metal properly, never mind the electric bill, for $7,000 I’d do it, for $19,700 I’d hope one of my friends hit me in the head with a blunt object. It could be a nice car and anything it needs is available but you need to do the math first.

  20. joeinthousandoaks

    If the factory K code engine is in place it was well bought at $19k. This car is super rare. The Vin is located above the starter on the right side of the block.

    • Rocco

      The VIN # is located on the right side of the block near the front just above the oil pan on K code engines. You can see it without removing the starter, since the starter is near the rear of the engine block.

  21. Keith

    Agreed this car went for a lot of money and has it’s problems. I do have a question to you all though…..I saw some people throwing out $5000 and $7000 for this car as a good price. Has anyone actually seen a K code car go for $5k recent;y? Or even $7k? Just curious because I work on a couple ‘Stangs per year and have a buddy who buys and sells many more than that per year, and have never seen a K car, even in this condition for $5k.

  22. Charles

    Two words: Rust bucket! Would cost a considerable amount of money to restore this worn out Pony! There are too many other Mustangs in far better shape than this one on eBay, Craigslist, Hemmings, etc.

  23. Shayne

    I got lucky in rust issues regarding my K code fastback. Mostly original paint, no rust and never been in an accident. But i am missing the original engine and trans (still have the 9in rear end). These cars are very hard to find and they always have problems just like ant other car. I got lucky with rust and body issues. But to get another correct trans and engine im looking at 12/13K and it will have the wrong vin.

    • Rocco

      Shayne,
      What state do you live in? I’m in NW Florida, and maybe I can help you.

      • Shayne Jenkins

        Im in Mesa, AZ.

      • Shayne Jenkins

        Wimbledon white, black interior, 4 speed.

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