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Matching Numbers Project: 1972 Dodge Challenger Rallye

It’s hard not to see the potential in things when you’re a car enthusiast. Most pointedly, we often look at cars that well past their expiration date, and either because of nostalgia or a perceived duty to save them, we take on projects with a bottomless pit of needs. I get it; I own several such vehicles! This 1972 Dodge Challenger is certainly rough, but it has so many attributes that are cherished by Mopar fanatics that it’s not surprising to see multiple bids to $2,550 here on eBay at this juncture. However, the reserve remains unmet and the bodywork needs are significant. Is this numbers matching project worth saving? Thanks to Barn Finds reader Larry D. for the find.

Ouch – that’s going to require a pretty big band-aid. The Challenger is in my neck of the woods, listed for sale in Brockton, Massachusetts. That part of the world doesn’t get the worst of what a New England winter has to offer, but the roads are still heavily sanded/salted come winter. The Challenger, of course, had a vinyl roof at one time, which may as well be the kiss of death for a vintage car that has the unfortunate luck to still be wearing one 50 years later. In the case of the Challenger, it was removed far too late after the damage was done. The seller notes the floors and fenders will need repair as well.

On the upside, it remains a numbers matching example. The 340 looks relatively complete, but no work has been done to see if it’s still turning freely. The seller has done the work to verify the engine is matching, but doesn’t specify whether the automatic transmission is original to the car as well. The Challenger left the factory with a positraction rear end, power steering, power brakes, and air conditioning, and the seller refers to it as a “Rallye” package car in the listing title. Those cars came with a blacked-out grill, hood with air scoops, blacked-out rear tail panel, and decals on the side. With the exception of the decals, the other elements are all still present.

That’s perhaps why I like this Challenger so much: despite the rust, there are loads of original details still hanging on, and the numbers-matching drivetrain further indicates there was a caring owner in its past prior to it being left to fall victim to the elements beginning in 1991. The interior looks relatively complete as well, and while it will need a full restoration inside, the Challenger again appears to demonstrate overall completeness that is hard to come by in “barn find” vehicles like this. The extent of the rust will likely turn off folks who reside in fair weather states, but I’m curious if there’s a Mopar fanatic out there who would restore this well-optioned Challenger back to good health.

Comments

  1. Superdessucke

    Rallye Junky!

    Like 3
  2. You'll a bit crazy

    Rusty, members pay…and members submit cars. I love this business model.

    Like 0
  3. Chris

    This is a saver with the original color to be finished off with . Great potential with this car especially number matching .

    Like 3
  4. Chris

    Unfortunately this car on E Bay has no title. No title is big problems ,still love the car , no title I walk the other way .Sad maybe part- car

    Like 4
  5. john bayless

    Got lost on its way to the salvage yard.

    Like 7
  6. Louie

    Sold. It was also listed on Facebook Marketplace for 7000

    Like 1
  7. nycbjr Member

    This is nuts 😂 cool car but Chester is right now does one fix that roof?

    Like 6
    • Mark

      Future convertible parade car.

      Like 3
    • walt

      It’s called Lead! But none of u new Computer Toads know anything about that!

      Like 8
      • Courtney

        Alot of folks never worked with lead. They fail to see that is an actual seam which would have been leaded at the factory. They are all bondo brats now. The Art of leading and restoring metal on vehicals is a dieing art. Not many of the young folks post 1970 know how to do real bodywork.

        Like 0
    • Patrick Shields

      Bondo how else

      Like 0
    • Mike

      Bondo how else lead won’t stick to rust

      Like 0
  8. MJF

    Hey, the numbers match….

    Like 2
  9. Steve Clinton

    Needs repair? Needs the crusher.
    I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again, “A fool and his money are soon parted.”

    Like 7
    • MJF

      LOL…. Absolutely

      Like 1
  10. Kenn

    Yet I’ve always wondered, how does a fool accumulate the money in the first place? Possibly an inheritance, which by reading this site as long as I have, there are contributors who perhaps should be worrying about that with their children and grandchildren.

    Like 0
  11. Kevin

    Like I said a few times on here,I’m a mopar man,but also a realist,this is money pit to hell!,good for parts only and what it’s bid up to is over generous!

    Like 3
  12. Courtney

    The roof is easy to fix the real issue will be the underside. What is left of the mounts ect. If the roof is rusted like it is what does the underside that gets all the salt look like.

    Like 1
  13. Courtney

    Alot of folks never worked with lead. They fail to see that is an actual seam which would have been leaded at the factory. They are all bondo brats now. The Art of leading and restoring metal on vehicals is a dieing art. Not many of the young folks post 1970 know how to do real bodywork.

    Like 0
  14. Maverick

    Mopile

    Like 0

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