Missionary-Owned: 1974 Buick Apollo

An actual car name consisting of letters, what a concept! Consonants and vowels mixed together forming actual, sensical words as car names. I love this era as much as I disdain the current era of Xs and numbers thrown together like a 1950s sci-fi movie. JX-2000, coming soon! Ugh. This Greek God approved 1974 Buick Apollo sedan can be found listed here on Craigslist in Gilcrest, Colorado, in-between Denver and Ft. Collins. The seller is asking $4,300 for this good-looking Buick. Thanks to the eagle-eyed Ikey H. for sending in this Apollo tip!

I know that these may not be the most popular cars here, but I really like this GM series of X-body cars which were based on the Chevy Nova and also came in Oldsmobile Omega and Pontiac Ventura form. The Apollo had to have been the most luxurious of the series since it was a Buick, wasn’t it? I only have experience with the same era Pontiac Ventura and I can’t remember the last time that I’ve seen an Apollo in person but I sure like that understated grille. They were only made for 1973, 1974, and 1975 model years.

This car isn’t only Greek God-approved, the owners are missionaries. If that isn’t a testimonial I don’t know what is. I would trust someone like that who gives so freely of their time to help others over almost any other human, but that’s just me. They say “The first owner had the car garaged for 43 years | never left the state and never drove it on long trips. I have owned the car for just over a year. My wife and I are missionaries and do not need it to just be sitting here in the states.” This beautiful example has, “New tires | starter | fuel pump/filter | radiator | water pump | shocks front and air shocks in back. Just tuned with all new wires | plugs | distributor | points”.

No power windows or cup holders?! Say, what kind of Buick is this anyway?! Remember when we all put those little plastic wastebaskets on the transmission hump with the cupholders on each side? Some of them had weighted beanbag flaps on each side and some had the pointy knobs on the bottom that were supposed to keep it from tipping over. Remember when we didn’t all need to have a resealable bottle of water with us at all times to stay hydrated so we didn’t instantly die of thirst? How did we survive those days! This interior doesn’t have that wastebasket/cupholder thing but I bet it did at one time. There appears to be some rust on the driver’s door behind the panel, I’d want to take that off and see what’s going on back there. These are “new fabric seats”, according to the seller. The back seat also looks great, and do you remember those flat headrests when they first came out? The ones that were way too low to really do anything? How did we survive those days! (again)

This honest-looking engine (I know, I see ’em but won’t mention it) is Chevy’s 250 cubic-inch inline-six which would have had an even 100 hp and 175 lb-ft of torque. It propelled this 3,500-pound Apollo from 0-60 in 16.4 seconds. I just bought a new winter vehicle with 5 times the horsepower and a 0-60 time 3.5 times faster than that yet it gets the same average mileage of around 16 MPG, all while being surrounded by so many airbags, cupholders, and heated seats and steering wheel, and headlight washers that it’s crazy. We’ve come a long way, but there’s something about these simple 1970s cars that gets to me, something that a regular person can work on him/herself. History is what it is and cars like this Apollo were what a lot of us had for choices in the early/mid-1970s in our price range. Help out some nice folks, someone buy this Apollo and give it a good home.

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Comments

  1. TimS Member

    They badge-engineered the hell out of that Nova, but I like the grille and lettering on the front. Nice example of a car nobody saved.

    13
  2. Bob C.

    That Chevy six will run forever, and ever, and ever. Should be unleaded fuel friendly too. Good one Tony Primo.

    4
    • Pat Lamb

      Just like the hallelujah chorus…

      12
  3. Chebby Member

    Needs license plate that says CREED.

    8
  4. Chebby Member

    Scotty, what is your 500-horsepower winter beater?

    5
  5. Alexander

    I owned a Buick with the venerable Chevy 250 six banger. Factory installed in my 69 Buick Special and was still running well when I sold the car rusted, sagging seats, suspension and all. This white beauty would look great with some period-correct Buick Rally wheels and raised letter tires. What…you could order them on anything I’m sure.

    3
  6. Andy

    Don’t all the current Ford, Chevy, Buick, Subaru, and most Toyota and Nissan models all have names like you describe? Maybe Carly Simon was right, these are the good old days.

    3
  7. Max

    2 years ago I bought Very Original 76 Pontiac Ventura coupe very similar to this Appolo just a decent well built classic !

    6
  8. Kenneth Carney

    Just right for Sis! Too bad it’s in Colorado
    and I’m unable to buy it. Otherwise, it would be parked under my carport! It’s
    cars like this one that keep the average
    guy in the hobby when he’s on a tight
    budget. Oh sure, they may not be as
    desirable as coupes or convertibles,
    but these too need to be saved from
    being crushed into oblivion. Some-
    one out there will get a good deal–
    too bad it isn’t me!

    5
  9. Del

    Great religious artifact.

    Too bad about those expensive repairs.

    About a $750.00 car.

    1
    • Duaney Member

      Why the negativity? I can’t think of too many other cars you could put your son or daughter in and know it would be dependable and safe. Price might be a little high, but $750? come on! You can’t even buy a rusted out Honda or VW for that price.

  10. stillrunners

    good old car there for the money…….

    1
  11. David Ulrey

    Has to be said. Buy it and go missionary style in it.

    1

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