One of Six: 1937 Lincoln K Willoughby Coupe

This 1937 Lincoln K series was recently pulled from a barn. The seller claims that it is one of the six Willoughby bodied K-series ever built. If this is truly the case it would be a monumental discovery, as it’s believed that only 3 of these still remain today. We are going to guess that this really isn’t one of the six, but you never know, it could be. If you’re interested in this rare luxury coupe, it can be found here on eBay.

Willoughby was a popular American coachbuilder in the ’20s and ’30s and is best known for their Lincoln and Rolls-Royce bodied cars. There is very little information out there about the K-series cars they built, likely because of how few were built. What is known is that all six were crafted out of aluminum, instead of steel like the standard K. It appears that this car’s body is made of aluminum, but finding a definitive answer is going to take considerable research.

The 1937 K-series made use of Lincoln’s 414 cui V12, which put out about 150 hp. This K’s original engine is still in the car, but has been partially disassembled. It appears all the original parts are still with the car. We would want to make sure that everything is there and in salvageable condition, as we imagine it could get expensive to find replacement parts for this V12.

The interior is in need of attention, but most everything is still there. The passenger side door panel is missing and a replacement will have to be sourced, thankfully the wood trim is still on the door. Someone obviously had plans of restoring it, but didn’t get any further than pulling a few pieces off the car. Hopefully most everything is still with the car, thankfully the seller does include photos of all the parts that come with the car and it looks like most everything is there.

We have been searching far and wide trying to find out if this really is one of the rare Willoughby K-series, but to no avail. Hopefully there is a Lincoln expert out there that can give us more insight into this car and whether it is really a Willoughby or if it’s just a standard K that somehow ended up with an aluminum body. Anyone have any ideas or knowledge they would like share?

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Comments

  1. paul

    Well how many other Lincoln bodies were produced in aluminum besides Willoghby & of course if they were the only ones, then all you would need is a magnet. Pretty cool but before my time. Good looking car.

  2. Bear

    Great looking car! Nice lines! Love the V-12 and the headlights & those huge wide whitewalls!! :-)

  3. geomechs geomechs Member

    Looks like it’s missing the speedometer as well. That’s going to be a challenge. Although I’m more of a Mom and Pop car guy I wouldn’t mind tackling a job like this. I sure wish they hadn’t stripped the engine down before stopping the project. External engine accessories could be extremely hard to come by. And you just don’t know until you’ve got the car sitting in your own shop.

  4. Thomas Spencer

    Neat car, not doubting the provenance, but it would be nice to see a coachbuilder’s tag.

  5. scot c

    ~ if it’s aluminum it is one of the six. there would be no upside in beating out one more front doghouse with such limited buyer pool.

  6. J. Pickett

    I agree with the gentleman above, If it was a coachbuilt car, wouldn’t it have some sort of builders tag? it is a beautiful car and seems to be restorable. I only wish I had the money.

  7. kevin

    it’s amazingly clean

  8. Justin

    looks really complete by looking at the sellers pics of all the parts laid out on tables. AThe speedometer is there in one of the pics and it looks like all of the engine parts are there also. I believe that this is truly what it is represented, however I would have to see it in person to verify.

  9. Andacar

    I very much want to work on a car of this vintage and get it running and driving again, but I think I’d chicken out on this one because of the aluminum body panels. Steel is tough enough to beat back into shape, but I wouldn’t know how to work on aluminum, and that front left quarter panel looks like it needs a lot of work.

  10. Jeff S

    Had you done some actual research before guessing, you would have discovered that Lincoln itself no longer produced a five passenger coupe on the Senior K chassis after 1936, and that the Willoughtby Style #356 was the only five passenger coupe offered. This example is undoubtedly one of the six made, and may well be the dark colored coupe with sidemounts (which were not standard) seen in the factory photo of the style.

  11. Andrew Marsh

    Hi, all Lincoln K’s had alluminum bodies , there fenders were steel but there hood, trunk, door skins and exterior bodies were alluminum, there is a body id tag under the passenger front seat which will indicate model and how many were made, the K # on the firewall should match the engine block number, I love Lincoln’s and presently own three Lincoln K’s, 1935 1936 and 1937 and have lots of parts for a 1935 Wiiloughby model 310 Limo,one of fourty made

    • Rancho Bella

      Mr. Marsh……..now that is a garage I would like to view

      • Andrew Marsh

        send me an email and I will send you some pics, I have indepth knowledge of Lincoln K’s and would be happy to share any info necessary.

    • harley

      can you send me your email address ? I bought the 1937 above will be looking for some parts. maybe you have some or know some sources to try thanks

    • David Hansen

      Dear Andrew Marsh, We’re working on a ’35 Model K Judkins Limo. Would like to discuss your resources: eg. looking for aluminum trim on running boards. Does anyone reproduce it? Thanks, David Hansen

    • Lee packer

      Andrew –Your name keeps coming up on Linkedin I’m not smart enough to make contact on that site —I do have a 37 Lincoln K 4dr –i-The least valuable –I am about ready to give up –I can’t find any one in my area that I would trust to make it run –The last time out I drove it from Chicago to Michigan But despite Over $7000 worth of engine work by previous owner I cant figure it out –Ray Theroult isn’t doing it any more —-Saw him at Hershey any solution in mind –This car has 59000 miles –Blue frame – nice original interior Rechromed Bumpers -one poor Repaint I’m Tired !!! /Lee Thanks

  12. Chris

    Beautifully styled car. I’m not usually a fan of sidemounts, but they look right on this car. I’d like to see this one after it is restored. Andrew, do you have any idea how much this wouold cost to restore including the engine rebuild?

  13. FRED

    THIS CAR IS TO OLD FOR ME BUT WOULD NOT MIND HAVING IT.I CAN’T BELIEVE A V12 WITH ONLY 150 HP.CAN THIS ENGINE BE MADE TO PUT OUT 300 HP ? THAT WOULD MAKE IT NICER. ADD SOME WIRE WHEELS WITH THE WIDE WHITES,NEW INTERIOR THAT LOOKS PERIOD CORRECT AND YOU GOT AN UPDATED GANGSTA MOBILE. I WISH MY GARAGE WAS AS CLEAN AS THIS GUYS.

    • Rancho Bella

      Fred,
      again with the all caps……… We will acknowledge you….just raise your hand.

  14. Rancho Bella

    I’m not into side mounts either…………but, this could be the exception. The lines are just so delightful.

  15. A.J.

    This car has been on the market before. I assume the current seller got it from this guy:
    http://forums.aaca.org/f119/1937-lincoln-2-door-5-passenger-314343.html

    And yes, it is what the seller is saying it is.

  16. Wayne

    Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. This is beautiful, especially up to the B pillar.

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