One Owner Barn Find 1969 Camaro

1969 Camaro

The Camaro has always been intriguing to me. They were built to compete with the Mustang (a battle that still rages today), but I’ve always viewed them as being slightly more muscle car and a little less pony than the Mustang. Granted the line between those two is a fairly thin one, but there is just something about their design that seems more muscular and less agile to me. Don’t get me wrong, I do love the way they look and I wouldn’t mind being the owner of this example, but they just seem to fit in a strange midpoint between pony and muscle! This supposed one (most likely it’s really 2) owner Camaro has been listed here on eBay in South Hackensack, New Jersey with a $5,000 opening bid.

1969 Camaro 350 V8 Engine

Given the definition of a pony car, the Camaro is a pony, but just like the Mustang it can lean more towards being a muscle car depending on which engine it was fitted with. This one has the universally known and loved 350 V8, an engine that you can find in everything from family sedans to pickups and even in the Corvette. I’d say in this configuration, this one is about as pony as you can get. It’s got decent power, wasn’t terribly expensive new and isn’t so front heavy as to plow through the corners. In my book, that’s all you can really ask for in a pony!

1969 Camaro Interior

As you can see, this Camaro has some rust issues, plus the paint is looking pretty rough. Being one of the most popular classic cars around means parts are readily available and you can even get all new bodies. Hopefully the rust isn’t that bad as to need the whole body replaced, but you won’t know without looking it over more closely. Being a 4 speed V8 car, I can see this being well worth the work it will take to fix up, although I think the price is a bit too high. If it were a bit closer to me, I’d be tempted to take a look at if for myself, as I’ve always had an itch to get one of these mid level Camaros and the fact it has a manual just makes it all that more tempting. Of course my willingness to buy it would come down to the rust and the reserve, but I could really see myself behind the wheel of this one! How about you?

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Adam B

    Going to take a lot to get all that rust repaired, but it will be a nice car when done. Being an original 350 4 speed car it will fetch a nice price finished. The question is will it sell low enough to justify the restoration.

    • Joe

      Original block is pictured, but looks rough. As far as pricing, I would consider this a non-numbers matching until block can be verified workable.

  2. mwrozmen

    Keeping in mind that the term Pony Car didn’t exist until the Mustang came around, the Camaro was a good challenger to Fords muscle. This particular example is over priced in its current condition. way to much work needed for the money. they do bring nice $ restored, but if you see that much damage up front, what’s hiding?

    • mwrozmen

      looking at those floor pans, makes me wonder what lies under the rhino liner in the trunk. and no photos of the frame or suspension.

  3. jaygryph

    Looks like a good candidate for a STYLO clone.

  4. Jason Houston

    There is nothing “pony” about any Camaro. The term was coined in 1964 by Ford dealers’ service personnel when referring to the “New Mustang”. Years later, the entire industry adopted the term for their small personal=sport cars.

  5. randy

    I’ve always liked the Camaro better than the Mustang, and I really like the fastback mustangs. It’s already up to 7K, reserve unmet. Any item is worth what someone will pay for it. Supply and demand in the free market. I do agree that 7K for this car exudes over zealousness on the bidders part.

  6. Howard A Member

    WOW, I just had a great idea. I just happen to have a K-5 chassis lying around. Hmm, I wonder,,,

    • randy

      Does it have a 454 in it? I have an idea too!

      • Howard A Member

        I was thinking more of an Allison aircraft motor. Hey, it could work. :)

      • randy

        Oh, a 2359 cubic in radial engine with 16 pistons? That would sound great!

  7. OhU8one2

    I would give it to Chip Foose and his team of excellence and tell him he has a clean slate. I don’t think I’ve ever seen one of his cars I didn’t like. I’d let him pick everything. Engine,trans,paint,interior,etc………SORRY. I sort of drifted into a daydream. Now for my self,I actually prefer the Firebird. Why? Able to get a 400ci,any day. Now I know about COPO,Yenko,Baldwin Motion who I think their cars are ugly.BUT the Camaro had option’s like rear disc brakes,chambered exhaust,houndstooth interiors,hideaway headlights,and better graphics. They were on strike in 69,and if I remember correctly. They actually made them for a year and a half. Would I take one if someone offered? Hell yes! I give the Camaro one thing,they always had style.

  8. randy

    Don’t you already have a nice Firebird?

    • Bobsmyuncle

      Nicely played randy

      • randy

        I could not resist. My bad

  9. JW

    As a Mustang / GTO guy I really like the first and second generation Camaros, after that nope, they talk about the Mustang II being a stepchild I consider the 3rd and 4th generation Camaros orphans. Too bad this one is a bit too rusty for my taste.

  10. Mark S Member

    For me the real attraction is doing the work I think more so then driving them. The two remaining pieces that I don’t have are a TIG welder and an English wheel I do have pretty well every thing else. I don’t really mind working on any old car that is why I’m still pretty excited about my 51 Dodge Mayfair 2 door hard top. I did a lot of metal work on that car, it really isn’t that hard to do. One of the tricks that I have not shared is what metal to use when making your own patches. Automotive bodies are either 20 or 22 gauge sheet metal which is pretty dam thin, when your doing small patches especially in hard to get at spots. Use 18 or even 16 gauge sheet metal, the reason being that when your welding it in it will handle more heat and you can direct your weld puddle more onto the patch then you would onto the body metal. Easier to weld in less distortion and it sure won’t rust out again. I think that almost any car body can be repaired ( with exception of the odd 356 body ) with the right tools and effort. You don’t need to rebody a car, that’s the easy way out. Learn how to do it your self the work is very rewarding. Cheers.

  11. cache

    Why is it the writer of this barn find post assuming there’s more than one owner? Did I miss something?? “This supposed one (most likely it’s really 2) owner” he write’s

  12. Keith

    I must say that I have to disagree with JW (all due respect intended) that the “3rd & 4th generation Camaros are orphans compared to earlier Camaros”. I personally own an all original low mileage 1997 Z28 Camaro LT1 that handles and has plenty of power. I’m sure it would out run and handle any stock generation 2 small block 350 Camaro all day long. Also in my opinion my generation 4 Camaro is built much better than the earlier Camaros to include better gas mileage. The reason why these older Camaros are more desirable is because of their rarity. The later Camaros aren’t in the (collector zone) yet but soon they too will be sought after in due time. The only fault I would put against my Camaro would be the use of too much plastic in the interior, but other than that I love it’s handling, power, and looks.

    • JW

      Keith I’m sorry if I offended you which was not my intentions, I was just stating my opinion and that’s all. Everyone loves what they buy and drive which I know some would hate my vehicles because I’m not a purest but a modifier. As far as my comment on the later generation Camaros they are not the only ones I didn’t care for the styling ( all newer cars are better mechanically and economical ) but even when Pontiac brought out that fast but hideous new GTO most original owners balked at the styling and I never cared for the late 90’s Mustangs but when they went back to the retro styling I fell in love with them again just as the new Camaros are sharp IMO. Again I didn’t mean to offend you or anyone else on what you like and drive just stating my personal opinion.

  13. Vince Habel

    I would never pay that much for a car needing this much work.

  14. Gnrdude

    Once again Car Needs a Fair amount of sheet Metal work, but all and all there seems to be a solid car Underneath.

  15. Barzini

    I wish the sellers explained why a car was off the road for so many years. There must be some interesting stories about why a car sat untouched for decades. Sometimes I think it’s a shame that the owner missed out of years of enjoyment.

  16. piper62j

    It sold for $8750.00,,, In my very humble opinion, that was a tad on the high side. Add in what work needs to be done and just parts alone will kill the retail value,, BUT you would have a great time restoring the car..

  17. randy

    Very high, the seller had a great day! Makes a person want to go out and start peeking into barns, eh?

    One good thing, at that price, the buyer will be motivated to take care of his investment.

  18. charlie Member

    Owned a ’69 from new from until 1984 when not only did fenders rust out below the knee height, but both front and rear subframess rusted through so there was nothing to attach the unibody to. Sold it for the interior and the Positraction differential for $500.

    • randy

      I bet you wish you had taken better care of it now. We all have our regrets when it comes to our previous cars etc.

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.