Pebble Beach Golf Cart: 1964 Voisin Biscuter 100

If you follow the Concours d’Elegance events, you will know that a Voisin won this last year at Pebble Beach. It demonstrated some unique French engineering and has brought some attention to the marque. There are bound to be a few more people out there pining for one, but few of us could ever afford it even if we could find a similar car. Well, we found a nice alternative. This is a 1964 Voisin Biscuter 100, and it might not share much more than the name, but it is a whole lot cheaper and more humorous. Find it here on eBay for $27,500.

Voisin manufactured airplanes before automobiles, and their designs were greatly influenced by their past. Aerodynamics and efficiency were very important principle to Voisin. If you squint really hard, perhaps you can make out a few similarities between the Pebble Beach winner and this little run-about.

The grill looks aerodynamic enough for a microcar, but the real efficiency comes from the fact that this thing is constructed completely out of aluminum. Interior accommodations are kept to the bare minimum to keep things light and that is a good thing because there is not much under the hood to move this thing around.

Power is provided, amazingly, by this single cylinder two-stroke engine. Nine horsepower is fed through a three-speed transmission to the right front wheel. It is not going to get you anywhere fast, but it should be enough to cruise around the golf course.

There are plenty of quirky French design cues here. We love the slopping sides and the denim top is the perfect complement to the raw aluminum exterior and red seat. This little guy may not be for most of us. It is for someone majorly into microcars who needs something special to add to their already extensive collection. Hyman is not going to let it go cheap, but this could be quite the conversation piece for the right person. We have a feeling that it would be the coolest golf cart at any country club in the world, even at the prestigious Pebble Beach.

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. J. Pickett

    Perfect for touring the lawn at large shows. Don’t use some jap four wheeler, do it in class.

  2. Bob

    I wonder how well OWD (one wheel drive) works on a grassy hill?

  3. Gerald Dobrynski

    I think it’s a bit of a stretch to call this “engineering” . I’m surprised that someone would admit that they designed and built this as serious transportation for humans. Disgraceful.

  4. Chris H.

    Found one of these in the bottom of a Cracker Jack box once, tossed it with the rest of the trash.

  5. Chris H.

    …by accident because it was so small.

  6. RICKY

    I’m definitely going to be bidding on this one. This is just what I need to ride around in my garage.

  7. jim marriner

    Biscuter was Spanish built;not French. Sold well enough before being replaced by the Seat 600 as the Spanish economy improved.

  8. jim marriner

    Shouldn’t the date be 1954 instead of
    1964 seeing how Biscuter ceased production after the failire of their Pegaso inspired minicar in about 1962?

  9. theyorkiedad

    The Biscuter is not French, it is Spanish, and it was built for daily transportation in Spain in the 1950’sw and 60’s. It was cheap for the average Spaniard to buy back then. The roads in spain were not very good, so speed was neveran issue. It could go a maximum of about 70 kilometeras per hour in thwe later models with the larg3er engine. The government of Franco promoted the little car.

    The ocmpany that built the biscuter went out of business. It was replaced as the car mosot Spaniards drove by the SEAT 600, a Spanish copy of the Fiat 600. Beli3evec it or not, the SEAT had better quality control that the FIAT.

    I actually had a friend who had one of these Bisccuters, and we wold travel around Madrid in it.. tthen he bought a SEAT 600, and thatc was the end on the little Biscuter

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