Revived Pony Said to Scat: 1967 Ford Mustang

The Ford Mustang was many people’s favorite car in 1964-66, so revising it for 1967 was at least something of a gamble. Would people embrace the changes as the beloved original Pony Car grew in size? They did, to the tune of 472,000 sales. Many of them were like this 1967 Mustang Coupe, available on Barn Finds Classifieds. It’s in Hazlet, NJ, and the seller is asking a cool $20K.

This Mustang is not described in detail in the ad, though we learn that the engine is redone as a 289-CID HiPo mated to a custom exhaust. Under the hood looks tidy and not overdone, but the block and valve covers appear darker than they should be, and other details look more auto parts store than factory, if that matters. The car, with 73,000 miles on the clock (no mention of the odo having turned over), is said to “scat.” Translate that to say someone has redone this Mustang as a fun driver rather than a trophy queen, though it looks pretty good for entry into local-level shows.

“But it’s not red.” You know what? Maybe not every resale candidate has to be. This one appears to be rendered in Lime Gold, a very popular color in the era, and with the contrasting black vinyl top, it conjures up pictures of the original owner—a teacher, maybe, or someone who worked in local government and for whom this Mustang was a once-in-a-lifetime buy. That person would have treasured the Pony and used it for decades. As for options—it could have had A/C, power steering, a console, or one of a number of radios (what’s there is clearly not original, but it’s hard to make out; the package shelf has 90s-style speakers cut in). But more likely, what you see (or don’t see) is what you get: a plain-Jane coupe with the 289 and automatic transmission being the standouts on the order sheet.

The Mustang looks straight and clean outside and inside. Sure, there are some nits to pick. One interior picture shows some wrinkling on the seat skin of the driver’s side and on the vinyl bolsters next to the rear seat back, but the photos of the driving position make me want to jump in and go somewhere. On the outside, none of the emblems are yet installed, though the holes are there, and the rear edge of the hood sits high. A bit more concerning is the lack of underneath photos. There’s no sign of what the trunk looks like. As Mustangers know, the rear frame rails are integral in this unit-body car, and if they rust, well, one good bang over a set of railway tracks can be fatal. The seller of this car is honest enough to say that the floors have been redone, so you know that at least in some areas, there’s been a rust problem. The seller uses the interesting word, “revived,” to describe the restoration. I’d go along with this, but I’d want at least a dozen more photos and a good long conversation about the history of the car and what’s been done to it before I got serious about making an offer.

 

Comments

  1. Scott

    I own a ’67 Sprint coupe w/289 AT, all stock, no rust but not sure it’s worth $20K. Love the old school cup holder, reminds me of the one my dad had in his ’77 Volare station wagon.

    Like 2
    • Brian Kennedy Staff

      Re Value: I wouldn’t have put it at this number either, but the value guides are even higher. Definite market shift.

      Like 1
  2. joenywf64

    Looks like Ford sold more than 7! times more mustangs in ’67 than they sold in 2021!
    Reasons? The ’67 had room for 4 & a decent size trunk. When was the last time you saw 2 people in the back seat of a modern Stang, Camaro, etc.? Have you seen the trunks as well in the new ones?
    & the base stang(& all other smaller cars) in ’67 was dirt cheap because it had very few options but a lot more people could afford a new one back then. & in ’67 there was an incredible choice of colors & for those with more money in the bank, at least 50 separate distinct options! Not many tho got a/c or even power brakes! & p/w & cruise control were not even available! Also in ’67 was a choice of fastback & notchback, like this car for sale.

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