This 1968 Porsche 912 Needs A Home

1968 Porsche 912

From Mike N – I bought this car from a long time Porsche racer, collector and I guess “hoarder”. I used to go to his farm and look around the barns. He has skeletons of all sort of Porsches lying around. I made a commitment years ago to buy the 912 for my own collection of Porsches. Time went on and the car stayed there until I got a call that the car had to be moved out of the barn. When I got there I noticed that all the skeletons of early 9112, 912, and 356s had been removed. I asked the owner about the cars and the cars and he said that they were bought up by two guys. Luckily my 912 was still there untouched. We had to drag the car out about 150 ft with a chain hooked to a big JD tractor as we could not get the car to budge under “human power. One front brake was seized from sitting all those years. It was not until the car was towed up the ramp of the car trailer that the wheel caliper got unstuck. Great news for unloading the car. The car was towed and placed in a dry storage unit with all the dust from all the years in the barn. It is still in “barn find condition”. I have decided to let this one go as I have several very near finished cars that I need to complete and just don’t have the time to work on.

Porsche 912 Project

The car has very serious rust, but these early Porsches have taken off lately and may be of interest to someone. I have followed resurrections of cars worse than this with lots of parts missing. Sheet metal is now readily available for these bodies. This car shows evidence of old repair behind the doors and jack spurs, but the most appealing thing is that the car is not dismantled and in boxes. It is missing a motor but the gearbox is there. Interior looks complete…but again it will need to be refurbished. This car can only be repaired by skilled auto body welder or highly competent weekend warrior. Original wheels are not included. It will come with the cookie cutters as shown in the picture. No tools or books included. Original color was champagne yellow a very rare color. Someone ought to restore this early 912. It would make a great rally car, 911R, 911 powered 912 or a glorious 912. Car can be seen by appointment. It is located in CT. I am asking $9,900.00 for the car as is. Here is a link to an album for additional pictures: http://s841.photobucket.com/user/PixPix2C/library/1968%20912?sort=3&page=1

912 Project

If you are interested in giving this 912 a good home, you can reach Mike via email here at naoz@aol.com. I want to thank Mike for sharing his Porsche with us and I hope we can find a good home for it! Oh and be sure to watch the videos below. The first is of the car being pulled from the barn and the other is of the car being towed through the previous owner’s yard!

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. MikeW

    Since when did 912’s get so valuable?

    • Josh Staff

      Porsche prices have skyrocketed and even the 912 and 914 are going for good money. According to NADA 912s go for between $18,400 and $49,600. And if you look at Hagerty’s pricing, they claim prices range between $20,100 and $62,300. I still remember when you could pick up a nice 912 for a couple grand, but those days are long gone.

      • George

        Josh,

        The note below sent to George was actually sent in reply to yours on the dollar range.
        When I decided to reply, George hit my brain pan first, and because it was a name I recognized, and I sent it to him.

  2. George Member

    Actually, 912s have risen remarkably in value, following 911’s and 356s

    Even with the considerable appreciation they have enjoyed, I think 9K for a rusty car with no motor is pushing the envelope a bit

    • George

      Nice going, George. Why didn’t you tell me that 912’s are “through the roof,George, through the roof” a long time ago. A girl friend of 45 +/- years ago like cool cars. He bought a Red w/ white interior, 1964 Impala Super Sport. In 1966 he drove into the driveway with a Red Porsche. She drove the car regularly since she bought it from him 3 or 4 years later. She quit driving it about 10 years ago, it has always been stored in her heated garage attached to the house. She offered to sell the car to me about 6 years ago but I really had no need of it and inertia resulted in my not buying it. We were trying to figure how much. She was talking $2200.00 and I wanted it cheaper. I have toyed with talking to her about it again, but now I would feel guilty starting with the same members we were tossing about then. On the other hand, she might just sell if for around that price. I mean she was my girl friend when her dad bought the Porsche, and we have been best friends since. That doesn’t occur in most break-ups. And no George, I won’t tell you her name or what state she lives in, but if I do buy it, I will post a picture. Sincerely, George (A George closer to the end of the rainbow than you are,George. Wish me luck,George, I know you are really glad for me.

  3. Dolphin Member

    Yes many asking prices for long-hood 911s & 912s are pretty high. But there are examples of excellent cars selling at reasonable (for long-hood cars) prices even at auction. The current SCM has a feature by Porsche guru Prescott Kelly of a ’68 911 in what looks like at least #2 condition at a famous collector car auction in the UK for $70,268, which includes the buyer’s premium that they tack on, so the bid price would have been about 10-15% lower.

    So if NADA and Hagerty think a ’68 912 is worth between $50-$62K, then Kelly is right that the UK auction car was “one smoking deal”. True, that was was a LHD car in RHD UK, but it still shows that prices can vary a lot.

    Maybe that has something to do with Kelly’s point that they made almost 82,000 long-hood 911s over 11 years. If there’s a certain law of collecter car prices, it’s that the more they made the lower sale prices will be, on average. And 82K cars is a lot of cars.

    I guess most car guys would say that the runup of early Porsche prices has been way overdone, maybe similar to the runup of big Healey prices years ago….which still haven’t recovered from the crash of those same big prices. At the least, sale prices of early Porsches vary a lot, and it will be interesting to see whether they firm up or continue to vary or even soften. I think they are softening and will continue to soften as most of the people who want them get one and demand gets weaker.

    .

  4. Achman

    912s offer many of the benefits of early 911s (looks and most of the sound) but with lower prices and marginally better handling.

    Not to steal this thread, and hope this is OK, but if someon is looking for something in much much better shape that is extremely dry and original, I have an excellent original 1967 912 that I am selling for a friend.

    Originally rare Champagne Yellow, just like this car, now Guards red.

    Original engine with twin Webers.

    Original Tranny.

    Porsche COA

    New interior. Original steering wheel.

    Mechanically excellent.

    Car is in Denver.

    Contact me if interested. 100 pictures available.

    brianach (at) gmail.com

  5. John

    Rust. Everywhere. $9900? It needs 3 times that in replacement body work. Sad. This was once a beautiful little car. Looks like salt air and perhaps winter roads have taken their toll. And no motor? It would be a labor of love. There is no way to ever turn a profit on this one.

    • George Member

      Couldn’t agree more.

      I restored one years ago that was in similar condition, but I paid $600 for it. I see 30K in body work, $10K for a new engine, and there are always “surprises.”

      At least most everything is available.

  6. Woodie Man

    No disrespect to Mike N……….but this is whistling past the graveyard. No engine……a 912……….and it needs E V E R Y T H I N G.

    I’m sorry.

  7. Mitch T

    A nice 912 could easily be $32,000 plus. It wouldn’t have to be restored or completely correct. I’m like Achman sitting on a nice example, ’69. Just don’t want it to go to someone that wants to build a 911.

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