1 Of 59: 1966 TVR Griffith Series 400

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With an asking price of $1,234,567, my first thoughts upon running across this TVR Griffith Series 400 were actually twofold, that the seller may have at least somewhat of a good sense of humor, thus possibly reasonable to deal with, and that the cost is likely quite negotiable.  But I guess my most initial notion was how much I’d like to see this one in my garage, but the price may as well be 2,345,678 as this one’s way out of my reach even at a realistic market value, so no worries about me getting to it first.  If you’ve got deeper pockets and have been in the market for a rare and unusual sports car, this TVR would definitely be worth checking out.  The car’s physical location is in Media, Pennsylvania, not far from Philadelphia, and it can be spotted here on Craigslist.

Many thanks go out to reader Tony Primo for the great tip here!  These offerings are a bit confusing, but from what I can gather the bodies were imported from the UK and sent to Griffith Motor Company in New York, who added a high-performance 271 horsepower Ford 289 and then assembled the finished product.  But by 1967 it seems everything that could go wrong did, including supply issues and a dock strike, and with only 59 examples of the Series 400 made the venture was over.

The seller has been the TVR’s caretaker for the past two decades, but until not long ago the car had been idle for 16 of those 20 years and in storage, with some recent refurbishing performed after such a long time off the road.  Nothing is specifically addressed regarding the exterior, but just about everything we can see outside looks either well-preserved or maybe it’s been given some attention in the past, and I’m really not seeing anything other than a straight body with a good finish.

The drivetrain was taken out and a fresh coat of paint was applied to the engine, along with a tune-up and a new Holley 600 carburetor installed.  The transmission was inspected and resealed, as was the rear end, plus quite a bit of brake work was performed.  Underneath, the components received new bushings and plenty of love, and there’s also a new exhaust system from the headers back.

Not much is mentioned about the interior, but overall things in there look to be in surprisingly good shape, with even the gauges not showing much wear.  So even after its long hibernation, this one seems like it’s ready to hit the road again, and with so few of these produced, I’d almost bet the farm there’s not going to be any others cruising around your neck of the woods.  What are your thoughts on this TVR Griffith Series 400, and what do you think is a fair price for it to exchange hands?

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Comments

  1. RayT

    Good thing the brakes have been worked on: the next owner will NEED them!

    Everything I know about Griffiths in anecdotal, but it’s not difficult to see why some found them frightening. Plenty of horsepower, not a lot of weight, and that short wheelbase all scream “Careful! I’m a handful”

    Even knowing that, I still want one. And why not? Even if they are an exercise in character-building on the road, they’re neat to look at. And what enthusiast doesn’t want more horsepower than they can handle?

    Would like to have an accurate price, but maybe the seller would offer a discount to a nice guy. If so, I’d apply….

    Like 11
    • Charles Pineda, Jr. Former candidate for Governor of California

      Mike Whitacre and Mike Jordan: Know how to drive a racing machine made for the road. Mike Jordan and owner Mike Whitacre with Nigel Reuben Racing beat the entire field of A,B, and C Production sport cars, which included the Shelby Cobras, 250 Ferrari GTO’s and LM’s, Bizzarini 5300’s, E- Jaguars, and the world’s best handling sport car of the sixties, the Lotus Elan.

      Thus the Griffith is so powerful and with its unequal wishbone suspension outhandled the entire field in that 2017, Graham Hill Trophy race at Goodwood, England. I’ve seen formula 1 racing cars with 45 inch wide tires fly off the racing course due to a driving error.. So if you buy a Griffith concentrate on the road.

      Like 1
  2. bobhess bobhessMember

    They might not be too far off on the asking price since the V8s are pretty rare. Wire Wheel in Florida (wirewheel.com) has 2 of the later models with the British engines. One a ’66 Grantura MK III 1800S factory race car, probably with a 4 cylinder engine, for around $68.000 and the other a ’70 Vixen 2500 with a Triumph TR6 engine for $69,900. Seems they all have prices that have gotten heavy over the years. Thought about buying one 20 years ago for $15,000. Didn’t, but think I missed the boat on that one.

    Like 5
    • Brian C

      He sold one on Ebay Motors several years ago for $100k.

      Like 1
  3. Rick

    That’s like a half hour from me. Of all the car shows I’ve been to, I’ve never seen it at any.

    Like 2
    • Brian C

      He hasn’t taken that one to any shows, but the others he has. I like this one for its British paint scheme. He usually takes the red TVR to the shows, but I don’t think he’s been to any since I moved away in 2015.

      Like 0
    • Charles Pineda, Jr.

      Rick: Jack Andrew Griffith built only 59 Griffith 400’s for the entire world, with all its sport car enthusiast. Later, TVR made a few in England with English V/8 motors.

      I’ve been trying to learn how many original Griffith 400’s still exist to no avail, however, lately I’ve seen quite a few racing in England. The 2022, RAC ,TT2,Celebration is an example. In the past, I only saw one lonely TVR Griffith 400, prepared by Niguel Reuben and owned by Mike Whitacre, and it beat the entire field of cars at the 2017, Graham Hill Trophy race at Goodwood, England.

      I read one comment where this fellow states that many owners of the Griffith 200 were killed, but nothing on the race car for the streets the new Griffith 400. If Niguel Reuben had prepared a few Griffith 400’s for Jack Griffith, who, by the way, didn’t race his cars, the Griffith 400 might have won Le Mans!

      Like 0
  4. Howie

    Yes looks great!! But with no real price, GLWS.

    Like 2
  5. Jack M.

    Craigslist requires you to list a price for the vehicle. Putting 123456 is like not putting a price. The seller is looking for offers.

    Like 8
  6. mike

    I thought April fools day was the 1st,?? Nice but…

    Like 2
    • Brian C.

      Very real. I like the red one he has, but this does have a nice British paint scheme. What makes them even more unique is that while the frames and bodies are the same, each car had its own builder/ mechanic working on it, so no two are exactly alike.

      Like 0
  7. Frank Sundram

    Media, PA, makes me think. The TVR Griffith V8 conversion was engineered by recent graduate engineer Mark Donahue, so maybe this one had his hands on it at some point.

    These were awesome machines in their day, but also hell holes due to lack of ventilation.

    I had one with the 4 cylinder engine and even in a northeast summer, just baked in the heat from the engine.

    Like 6
    • Brian C.

      I don’t think Mark has seen any of his TVRs. He is a very private person. I think the last show he took a car to was in 2015.

      Like 0
  8. Martin Horrocks

    Good description. The Griffiths are legendary, prone to breaking driveshafts in period.

    Modern vintage racers have done a lot to tame the beast, though it still takes a skilled and brave driver to run with the fastest Cobras.

    Like 2
    • Charles Pineda, Jr. of California

      You are absolutely correct! Reuben Nigel Racing of England has prepared many of the TVR Griffith 400’s that today are competing in sixties GT racing events in Europe.

      One example is the beautiful silver blue Griffith 400 owned by Mike Whitacre and also driven to victory at the 2017, Graham Hill Trophy race,75MM, 60’s Gt’s. Here in the U.S. Mark Donuhue worked on the Griffith 400 to make it a Shelby AC Cobra killer. View the above race on U-tube. It’s a great race.

      Like 2
    • Charles Pineda, Jr.

      Martin: Steve Ferron, RIP, was also a metal shop teacher. He made a special alloy which solved the breaking of driveshafts for the Griffith 200’s. The Griffith 400 has a better and stronger driveshafts, but Ferron’s were stronger yet!

      Steve, was a friend and my Griffith mechanic at times. He had just about any Griffith part one needed, and if didn’t have it he could make it. I’ve always wondered as to what his wife and son did with all those parts and his cars.

      Like 2
  9. John

    Question. Was this one of the TVRs with a wooden chassis or am I confusing it with something else?

    Like 0
    • Jimbosidecar

      I think you’re confusing it with the Marcos.

      Like 6
    • Charles Pineda, Jr. Retired Parole Board Judge and first owner of a 1966, Griffith 400 in Ferrari red!

      John: No wooden chassis on any Griffith 400. The Marcos sport car is the only car with a wooden chassis that I know of, and racing at Goodwood and other English race courses.

      Mark Donohue fine tuned the Griffith 400’s, and worked on the new wishbone suspension, which the Ferrari GTO’s don’t have.

      Like 1
    • Charles Pineda, Jr.

      John: The Marcos had a wooden chassis. One sees them racing in the 60’s, Gt, races. I believe they were a Class C production sport car, and they had only a few problems with the wood chassis.

      Like 1
  10. Jimbosidecar

    I might be wrong, but isn’t this a Griffith and no TVR nameplate? Right after high school graduation I used to drive by a gas station on my way to and from work with one sitting inside one of the bays with a for sale sign. They wanted $1800 for it (1973) but that was just too high for me. But how I lusted after that car.

    Like 1
    • LotusS777

      Technically, you are correct, as you can see by the Griffith badge on the front. Kind of like a Shelby Mustang I suppose, which are a lot more Ford, than Shelby, although some may get their nose in a twitch about it all.

      Like 3
  11. Bob

    Ugly but very fast. Faster than the cobra’s. But typically British quality. They were I believe couple hundred lbs lighter than a cobra!

    Like 4
    • Bob

      If you ever go to the Revival Races at the Goodwood, UK race circuit, you will see these being raced and they run dead even with Cobra’s and Lightweight Jag XKE’s. If prepared well and have a good driver, they will win!

      Like 5
    • Bob

      Beauty is in the eyes of the beholder. Personally, I think they are attractive. The short wheelbase throws may off its looks.

      Like 5
      • Charles Pineda, Jr.: Ca. Parole Board Judge

        Bob: Your truism is right on the money. I fell in love with the Griffith 400 and all of its soft curves and the real (US fake louvers,vents,etc.) vents and louvers, seven on each side of the engine bulge, plus the rear end of the Griffith 400 with it reverse Mercedes tail lights.

        I read an Internet article where a 250 Ferrari GTO sold for $70,000,000.00 dollars in a private sale. Yet, see the video on U-tube: 10 minutes of raw Ferrari 250,GTO,on board at Goodwood. Did you see Mike Whitacre’s Griffith 400 in Scottish Silver Blue in front of the Ferrari?

        As usual, no recognition is given to the Griffith 400, or the Bizzarini 5300 leading for a while until the TVR Griffith 400 passes it. The 12 cylinder Ferrari tries hard to catch the Griffith 400 to no avail, and in the straight away where the 250 Ferrari GTO is suppose to be faster then the Griffith pulls away so far behind as leaving it in the dust! And that’s the way the video ends.

        So, this fellow asking for one million two hundred thousand plus might eventually get many more millions for that Griffith 400, for that Griffith has a short wheelbase, but it has double wishbone suspension with four shock absorbers in the rear, where the 250 Ferrari GTO has a live axle, just like an ordinary automobile.

        That unequal, double wishbone suspension, allows the Griffith 400 to pivot quickly and keep all its tires in touch with the track, or road. Notice how the Cobras and E-Jaguars coming around a curve, at speed, lose traction on their inside tire! Why sometimes the lift is about four to six inches, the Griffith has none! All tires on the track.

        In conclusion, there is a site where a 250 Ferrari GTO is compared to a Griffith 400, and one reads about the Ferrari having a higher top speed than the Griffith 400, but in real competition, and as shown in the video above the Griffith nullifies the author’s idea of the Ferrari’s top speed in the straight away. Again, I believe that those 59 Griffith 400’s will one day be worth tens of millions, and the billionaires and trillionaires will have them in their car collections.

        Like 1
  12. jwaltb

    If it’s anything like the 200 bring a fire extinguisher!
    A guy I knew had one and it burned to the ground.

    Like 0
  13. Bill McCoskey Bill McCoskeyMember

    In the late 1970s a room mate of mine had a Griffith TVR with the Ford V8. He bought the car after it had been in an accident that required the body be pulled off the tubular chassis/frame. He spent hours trying to get the chassis back to original specs, but every time one of the tubes was repaired to the original spec, others suddenly were wrong. He finally gave up and even offered it to me for free, but I turned it down as I already had too many projects underway. Don’t know what happened to the car.

    Like 1
    • Charles Pineda Jr.

      Bill: Was his a 200 or 400?

      Like 0
  14. JD

    Why would anyone install a FRAM oil filter on a Cobra 289 engine ? That engine deserved a WIX or better.

    Like 3
    • jeff

      The old orange grenade!!!

      Like 0
    • Bill McCoskey Bill McCoskeyMember

      JD,

      Perhaps things have changed since, but in the 1970s I attended a seminar on engine oil and filters [I believe it was hosted by Lucas Oil Co.], and everyone was invited to bring along an unused spin-on type filter. The man conducting the seminar used a big cutter similar to a kitchen can opener to open up filters to expose what was inside. At the time I was working in a motor pool for the US Army, so I brought a new OD Green WIX brand oil filter for a M151A1 Jeep engine. This was the standard issue filter for all the Jeeps we were working on. WIX also made most of the other military truck filters used in trucks like the 5/4 ton, 2.5 ton and 5 ton trucks we repaired

      He saw the Jeep filter and started laughing. He knew what we would find when the filter was opened. He cut the flange off the can and pulled the 2 pieces apart. The entire insides of the filter area was filled with chopped up old cotton clothing! I’m not kidding! He said it met US Military specifications for an engine oil filter! And it was [of course] low bidder on the military contract.

      Like 8
      • JD

        Things have changed since 1970 when was in my twenties but during that decade a lot was changing .The Wix you described in fact filtered better than the paper core or rope cartridge that most aftermarket or automaker branded filters did . Most taxi fleets back in the day used Dual “toilet paper” filters, I think Charmin was around back then haaahaa.. and the toilet paper filters were proven to filter better than OEM. Of course there was room under the hood for them in those old barges, they routinely got over 250k miles from them when most engines mistreated by the average citizen that only added oil as needed, where in the shop for a valve job by 40 k miles . Taxis back then idled more than made even low speed trips. Oil filtering occurs mostly at low engine rpm, even up to the present in most engines, so it is all about square inches of filtering area, the more there is the better .FRAM does not have the inferior stuff which that 289 deserves, and it deserves at least a Wix or Napa, if not a FOMOCO filter. I have opened Frams to compare them, nothing has changed about them, they still do not stack up to any maker. Wix and Napa Gold are made by the same Chinese company, but the Wicks costs more because it includes a metallic cage net in the core of the filter media in case it gets clogged enough to collapse, the Napa Gold version does not. Irrespective of that fact they have better quality filtering media than does Fram. You can view several You Tube videos on how they come in dead last, and, if the was a lower classification they would probably earn it.
        For all my vehicles I use OEM..filters , Ac Delco , Toyota, Mazda,the brands are emblematic of my non discrimination attitude since I buy the best vehicle brand for the purpose and needs .The reason I buy OEM is simple, their specifications are better than 98% of aftermarket, besides, if something ever happens under warranty there is an “in your face” factor to the maker that needs to cover the warranty repairs , they cannot blame the brand of consumables used aka … their own.

        Like 3
      • bobhess bobhessMember

        Good information Bill. We use the NAPA Gold no bypass filters in our race cars and the standard Golds in our other vehicles. All of them are made in the US. Got one off the can openers that we use to check bearing wear in the race car engines and over the years have had no problems.

        Like 2
  15. FrankDMember

    Lets try a real number. $130,000 give or take depending on the condition of the frame. You need to cut the body off the frame because it glassed to the frame. A cool car, the daughter of a Massachusetts mob boss had one years ago. It reminds me of a 427 Cobra at 60 mph in fourth gear you could break the tires loose. If your over 6 feet move on.

    Like 1
    • Curt Donner

      I have owned Griffith 4005031 for about 2 years now. Back in the day my friend owned 2 Griffith 400s at the same time, before I knew how rare they are. I am 6’2″ and started out driving with the driver’s seat cushion removed and just sat on the webbing that seat cushion rested on. Then I had an upholstery shop make me a driver’s side seat cushion that resembled the factory one but ONLY half the thickness. Works very well.

      Like 3
  16. Harvey Paul

    In 1965 the Griffith 200 was the fastest car in the world , the 400 was the same car with some body only changes . These eat Cobras and everything else in that day .They say Take 500 lbs off a Tiger and you have a Cobra , then take 500 lbs off a Cobra and you have a Griffith . If you do not have driving talent do not get behind the wheel . Very cool car !

    Like 6
    • Curt Donner

      The 400 came with more than “body only changes”. Among those changes were stronger universal joints and beefier hub carriers. It already had the top loader gear box and Salisbury rear end. You do NOT have to own the track record at Thunderhill in order to drive and enjoy the 400. BUT, know and understand the 400’s capabilities and limits, know the conditions you are driving in, AND be honest with yourself and your limitations and abilities. Having said that, it can be a blast to drive, especially getting up to freeway merging speed on the on ramp!

      Like 3
  17. Kurt Brackin

    I remember a review of a TVR in a magazine, don’t remember which one or who wrote it, but they described it as looking like a “truculent troll”.

    Like 0
  18. Bruce

    Own two 200 Series. One a literal barn find I just purchased in November that has been off road over 50 years. Struggling to decide to keep in original or total restoration. This car is ten minutes from my house. Likely should be over 6 figures. Personally I like the styling of the 200s as they appear to have had their rear chopped off. They are scary fast for guys like me that aren’t professional racers.

    Like 2
  19. George Birth

    My personal opinion is anyone who pays $1M for any car no matter how rare, needs his head examined!!

    Like 0
    • JD

      I agree with you but there appears to be a shortage of examiners for the head these guys use when they shell out a million for any rare car..that will be a garage ornament

      Like 0
    • Bob

      George, if you have the ability to purchase at that level who cares? I’m glad the folks who can pay that much, do it, as it keeps the classic car market going. If you can’t afford it, like me, just enjoy the design, the engineering or the creativity of the vehicle! Would you pay millions of dollars for some of the art pictures sold? Maybe not, but do you admire the creative ability of the artist? I hope you do! So, cool it on your outrage comments.

      Like 3
      • jwaltb

        Everybody is entitled to my own opinion!

        Like 2
      • Bill McCoskey Bill McCoskeyMember

        jwaltb,

        As I always like to say, “Everyone is entitled to their opinion, no matter how wrong they may be!”

        Like 0
    • Charles "Chuck" Pineda, Jr.

      Kurt: That comment, in all probability, came from a Shelby AC Corbra or Corvette that got dusted by a TVR Griffith 400. In 1967, I caught an AC Cobra at the giant Slalom at the Riverside Gran Prix race track. I got so close that they gave me the yellow flag.

      Like 1
      • Kurt Brackin

        From what I remember, and it was a long time ago, they were only commenting on the styling. I don’t remember any complaints on the performance.I ran a Corvette Club Autocross 1981 that was open to anyone. I beat all the Vettes on street tires. I had a ’76 Honda Civic running in G-Stock(SCCA Class). In their defense, it was a very tight course. I was Susquehanna Region SCCA G-Stock Champion that year.

        Like 1
    • cotobob

      There is a 1962 Ferrari GTO up for auction this weekend at the Monterey Rolex weekend at Sotheby’s. The estimated value is, $62,000,000!

      Like 0
  20. Bruce

    Six figures is $100,000.00, not a million. Just saying….

    Like 2
    • JD

      Just responding to the man who stated a million ..I did not fact check him , but 100 k is still deserving of head examination. Collectible cars are worth what somebody is willing to pay for them. I have owned some cars from the late sixties that would bring that 100k in if in pristine conditions but I had fun with them when I was young enough to do it , and spat them out like a chicken wing bone when I was done with them . They were cars not god images to be put in a niche and prayed to like some saint in a church. That insanity has no cure that I know of.

      Like 2
      • Brian C.

        He sold one for $100K on Ebay Motors several years ago. This one is in better condition. I believe he does have a car that will get him a 7 figure price some day.

        Like 2
  21. cotobob

    My digit error, it’s up for $62 million!

    Like 0
  22. Charles Pineda, Jr.

    For a machine, the Griffith 400, that beat every Ferrari GTO and LM at the 2017, Graham Hill Trophy race, 75 MM, a couple of million isn’t asking too much for the beautiful blue Griffith 400. As more millionaires and billionaires see these Griffith 400’s beat their marques they will be looking for one for their collection, but finding an original Griffith 400 made in the USA will be a problem, for only 59 were built for the whole car racing world.

    TVR in Blackpool, England built some Griffiths and they refer to them as TVR Griffith 200’s and 400’s. However, they are also very rare. Jack Andrew Griffith’s cars didn’t get much publicity, and even when they won (above race) little was written about them. Yes, the Cobras, Ferrari’s, E-jaguars got all the press. I know. I couldn’t find a single US sport car magazine that interviewed and wrote of how Mike Whitacre and Mike Jordan in their Griffith 400, again, beat the entire field at Goodwood. I went on the internet to find articles, interviews, evaluations, and competition on the race to no avail!

    In conclusion, the Griffith sport cars needed, badly, a public relations corporations to let people/race car fans know of a race car built for the streets, the Griffith 400. That might have kept the Griffith Car Company alive.

    Like 1
  23. bill buan

    The Griffith 400 is unique and is a very fast, very rare car. Most people have never heard of it. I have owned my red Griffith 4006055 (model 400, year 66, s/n 055 of 059) since 1983. I can confirm is gets hot inside. It can also be a handling handful for the uninitiated. It is incredibly maneuverable in the hands of a competent driver. When you have a car that weighs less than 2000 pounds with a hi-per V-8 engine, you must treat it with respect.

    My car is presently in the shop being “upgraded” after I let it sit unused since 1998 due to clutch failure. This upgrade is costing WELL over its original MSRP. It’s current market its value is in the $150-200K level. Recent publicity of Griffith 400’s racing at Goodwood, etc., and beating vintage Cobras, GT40s, and Ferrari’s has definitely increased its public exposure and value.

    We have replaced all brake components, fuel tank, lines, clutch, and the heavy generator with superior parts, but keeping originality where possible. The two lower center frame sections were replaced with new 0.120″ DOM tubing due to rust caused by the original design fiberglass wrapped frame that held moisture even though the car has been garaged the entire time. It now has a new ($20K+) 347 CID Ford racing engine producing 458 HP at 7000 RPM and has a new huge radiator to deal with additional engine heat. It is being prepared for autocross duty. The old 3:07, non-posi Jag rear has been replaced with a post 3:77 Jag rear end.

    If there are questions, I (william.buan@comcast.net) probably know as much as anybody about Griffiths since I wanted one since the 60’s, and have owned, worked on, and raced mine since 1983.

    Like 2
    • Charles Pineda, Jr.

      Bill: I was delighted to be reached by a member of the Griffith 400 family. We are indeed a rare bunch! I’m writing a book on my Griffith 400 experience and driving it in 1966, from Lavonia,Michigan to Los Angeles, California.

      I flew from California to Michigan as I had written the Griffith Motor Company regarding the Griffith 200 I has seen race and beat Shelbys AC Cobras for about seven laps before Tom Lynch hit a rock on the Goleta course and blew his right rear tire and DNF.

      I received correspondence and a leaflet advertising the new, gorgeous, Griffith 400, it was love at first sight! I sold my 356A Porsche 1600 with 68 or 70 horses, Class E, for a Class A Production race car for the streets. and, Praise the Lord Christ Jesus, we still have it.

      Like 3
      • bill buan

        Charles, it was good to hear from you. We are indeed a rare bunch. The only other “Griffith” people I’m aware of are Mike Mooney, Don Antilla and Steve Ferron. Steve became ill and I lost track of him, Don just sold his Griffith 200 but gave me copious notes on his restoration, and Mike Mooney hosts https://griffithmotorcars.com and has written a Griffith book.

        My Griffith is presently at Aldridge Motorsports where we have been addressing “issues” for the last two years. He is the only west coast Ford authorized racing distributor, and has been building racecars for 58 years.
        He has TIG welder, Bridgeport Mill, and a Lathe. We have needed all of these machines to address issues. He agreed to do a “tuneup” on my car. We did not realize what this would entail. It was like peeling an onion. Seems like everything we looked at needed attention … we are still working on it, but it is getting close to completion. Today I’m going to his shop to install all the fittings and aeroquipe stainless hose for the new gas tank vent. Then its on to wiring the new MSD ignition system. It was nice to hear from you. Please keep in touch.

        Here is a link to my Griffith 400 https://barnfinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/image-10.jpg

        Like 1
      • Bill

        Hello Charles, good to hear from another Griffith owner. Feel free to contact me at my email above if you have any comments you don’t want posted. I’m assuming you know Mike Mooney, and potentially Steve Ferron and Don Antilla – all people connected with Griffiths. Mike was the original Griffith test driver and hosts the Griffith store, Steve raced a Griffith 200 for years and sold many Griffith parts he fabricated. Unfortunately, I believe he became ill and I lost contact with him. Don was recently sold his Griffith 200 for about 135K.

        My car … https://barnfinds.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/image-10.jpg

        Like 2
    • Brian C.

      Hello Bill,
      My name is Brian. I am a friend of the seller of this car. He owns several of them. He knows Mike Mooney. I met him once at an event out in Ohio. The Owner is Chris from PA. Others should know who I am referring to if they are fans of these cars. Chris restores and rebuild all his Griffiths. I know he even has spare parts. I believe he listed this car on several sites. I know he has a red and a silver Griffith. And I think an Eagles green one.

      Like 1
      • Charles Pineda, Jr.

        Thanks for the information. It seems the Griffith 400 family is growing!

        Like 0
      • Charles Pineda, Jr.

        Brian: Just reviewed your e-mail and learning more on our sport cars- The Series 400 Griffiths.

        What caught my attention was the Ohio reunion of the Griffiths, as I was there at the Griffith site, with Mike Mooney and his Griffith trailer. I also attended the great steak dinner at the lodge. Maybe we met, but there were so many of us that we, in all probability, don’t remember.

        I’ve predicted that those Series 400 Griffiths would eventually climb to historic prices. I’ve stated that when billionaires see their Cobras, 250 Ferrari GTO’s and LM’s beaten they start looking, or their car staff begin looking for one of those superfast Griffith 400’s for their collection. Yes, even a couple of million is pocket change for the oil sheiks, international BIS central bankers, and owners of our military industrial complex.

        Well, have a great new year, and keep in touch.

        Chuck Pineda in Sacramento, Ca.

        Like 0
  24. Charles Pineda, Jr.

    Bill: My wife and I met Jack and Marge Griffith and their daughter plus a small group of Griffith owners at the 2011, Amelia Island Concourse d’ Elegance. Met exmarine Mike Mooney at the Gathering of the Griffiths and a host of other Griffith afficionados at in Ohio. To bad the Griffith that was suppose to race didn’t race at all! And I flew out of Sacramento, Ca. to see the Griffith 400 in a competition race, but seeing Mike’s huge trailer with the Griffith advertisement made my day, and the dinner at the restaurant was an excellent one.

    My old friend Steve Ferron who worked on my Griffith a few times passed away about five years ago. He had a great workshop and with lots of Griffith parts for both Series 200’s and 400’s. He also had the heavy steel body of a Griffith 600, which was not really a TVR DNA Griffith, either Series 200 or 400. It was a heavy car with a Chrysler 273 V/8 engine, and couldn’t handle like the TVR Griffiths, and I believe Mark Donohue really tried to improve the handling to no avail. That’s why, I believe, no one has ever seen a Griffith 600 race at Goodwood or any other sport car race course.

    As most of us know the Griffith 600 became the Omega, then another name, and then ended with an Italian firm and disappeared.

    By the way, Steve Ferron was a metal shop teacher and in his shop he had all the machinery to make Griffith parts for both Series 200 and 400. He did improve my braking system by installing disc brakes on all four wheels, and boy can my Griffith come quickly to a complete stop. I believe the original disc and drum combination is adequate because the car is so light.

    Again, thanks for the information, and good night. I just looked at the time and its12:57 a.m. so I didn’t check the spelling.

    Like 1
    • Bill B

      Thanks for the Steve F. update. I am very sorry to hear of his death. He was definitely a Griffith enthusiast, very personable, and quite a capable machinist. He was also a racer. I remember meeting him at the track where he was racing his white Griffith 200. I bought many Griffith parts from him. I also remember buying him and his wife dinner in Huntington Beach while visiting him to pickup some parts. We had a great visit.

      Also good to hear from you Brian C. and info about your friend.

      Also, I attempted to get a current list of Griffith owners from pistonheads.com in England. There was quite a long thread on their website about Griffiths. In fact there is even a current Griffith thread.

      https://www.pistonheads.com/gassing/topic.asp?t=2052799

      Unfortunately it appears some owners were reluctant to have their information listed, so the list was never released. Sadly, many Griffith owners are getting up in the years, including me at 73. That makes provenance chasing of a Griffith much more difficult. I am owner 5 of my car. First owner was supposedly Jimmie Pflueger, owner of Pflueger Ford in Honolulu in 1966 (its now a honda dealer). He was a racer, and a real character in general.

      Like 0
  25. Charles Pineda, Jr.

    Brian: Just reviewed your e-mail and learning more on our sport cars- The Series 400 Griffiths.

    What caught my attention was the Ohio reunion of the Griffiths, as I was there at the Griffith site, with Mike Mooney and his Griffith trailer. I also attended the great steak dinner at the lodge. Maybe we met, but there were so many of us that we, in all probability, don’t remember. THIS HAS NEVER BEEN MENTIONED BEFORE. CHECK MY EMAILS. GRANTED SOME OTHER COMMENTS ARE CITED LIKE THE RISING PRICES OF THE SERIES 400, BUT DO YOU REFUSE TO POST NEW INFORMATION?

    I’ve predicted that those Series 400 Griffiths would eventually climb to historic prices. I’ve stated that when billionaires see their Cobras, 250 Ferrari GTO’s and LM’s beaten they start looking, or their car staff begin looking for one of those superfast Griffith 400’s for their collection. Yes, even a couple of million is pocket change for the oil sheiks, international BIS central bankers, and owners of our military industrial complex.

    Well, have a great new year, and keep in touch.

    Chuck Pineda in Sacramento, Ca.

    Like 0

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