1929 Ford Model A: Roadster Pickup

1929 Model A Roadster Pickup

Hagerty says that pickups are the fastest growing collector car segment, but I don’t think this Model A Roadster pickup is what they have in mind. This is an older restoration stored for years. It’s yet another car restored and forgotten. When it was finished, it must have been worth a lot more than it is now. The owner is asking $16,000 and has listed it here on craigslist. It is a California car and said to be rust free and in need of the usual things to get it running again. It’s in Placerville, California, within an hour of me, so if someone is really serious about it,  I’d love an excuse to drive up and have a look at this and take more pictures for you. So do you see this truck going up in value?

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. Mark E

    Wait a second! Hooooooooold it…

    So this was originally a Model A roadster that some previous owner made into a pickup?

    Please explain why that would make it worth as much (or MORE) than a factory-made Model A pickup?!?? o_0

    • Mark E

      Okay, now I can see, thanks to Google, that there MAY have been a factory-made Model A open (roadster) pickup.

      Curiously I can find tons for sale and lots of pictures but NO info whatsoever on production. Oh well.

      Next time I’ll do a little research before commenting! *^_^*

      • geomechs geomechs Member

        Hi Mark. Have you got access to the Standard Catalogue of American Light Trucks? I think you’ll find some production figures there. I’d check it myself but I’m at work and my book is at home.

  2. Peter

    Kudos to David, for the “find,” and for being so willing to investigate further–that’s very generous.

    I’m pretty positive there were convertible Model A pickup trucks, from Ford, because I’ve wanted one, for years, since I first saw one.

    I believe, however, unfortunately, that the top, canvas-covered though it may be, may NOT fold down. Goofy as it sounds, the one I saw was owned by a gentleman who told me if you wanted to drop the top, you literally had to…take it off and set it on the ground (or a pallet, whatever).

    Still, a cool vehicle.

    KBB and Hagerty don’t even have ANY Model A’s, as far as I could tell–I checked.

    I certainly think it could go up in value, and probably will–I was just trying to find out if it’s even fairly priced where it is.

    And sadly, one argument against (mass-produced) vehicles of this era going up, that I’ve (depressingly) read, in more than one place, is that the demographic for this era of collectible is…not getting any younger, and thus, some actually predict interest/value may stay flat, or even decrease, going forward.

    I don’t think that’s super-likely, but it’s a definite (if gruesome) negotiating point.

    If I were interested, I’d look at Hemmings Motor News, for comparable “asks,” and any auction results I could find (if you subscribe to Hemmings, you should be able to read their reports of [partial] auction results, online).

    Or, you may be able to just visit sites like Bonhams, RM, B-Jackson, etc…, and search comps for free–I never tried.

    Cool truck–LOVE the no-rust CA history–it’s just 3,000 mi. away from me, and other vehicles need me more, and vice versa.

    Hope a fellow Barnfinder gets it!

    Peter

  3. 1969Deuce

    Most of the canvas top military vehicles (WCs, M series, designed early 50s and before) are not fold-down. I suspect they’re from the end of an era where you remove the canvas, then remove the frame, and optionally, fold down the windshield.

    Steve

  4. Rich

    As Peter said, sadly prices are creeping downward on the prewar cars due to lagging interest, while prices for baby boomer era and now gen x cars are moving upward.

  5. 1969Deuce

    Personally, I like it a lot though I haven’t a clue on its actual value. As for interest waning, consider how many can’t drive with a clutch, let alone a non-synchro transmission.

  6. Cameron Bater UK

    I think (though I’m not sure as my knowledge of pre-war USA cars is somewhat ltd) that these weren’t what we’d consider toady a “normal” bi-folding roof and as such I think the canvas roof probably turns the vehicle into a convertible in a similar fashion to the optional hard roofs on many British convirtables like the Triumph Stag, I think there was even an option on the Mustang for a similar system where you can put a bolt on hard top on for winter and remove it for the summer or when you want a bit of breeze in your hair.
    When you’re not using it the roof goes on a pallet or something until you need it again.

    Quite quirky though, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a convertible pickup of any era or marque and this is one I’d consider buying if I had the cash.

  7. snerd

    I have same vehicle, these were factory made. The top comes off as a unit, there was a variant that folds down. My 1928 Ford roadster PU was my 95 yr old dad’s and the asking price is just about right. My Hagerty insurance value is in the ball park.

  8. OKCPhil

    Oh……SNerd….that pickup looks great.
    1969Deuce….Being in the late 40s I think I might be that last group of folks who could drive this with a couple of minutes instruction. Not knocking you younger guys and girls who have standard cars and can drive stick but just saying as a whole the numbers are dwindling.
    Love the pickup though and the color. Would be great to haul mulch and other small stuff from Home Depot

  9. geomechs geomechs Member

    A local car club member restored one and recently sold it. I think he got in the neighborhood of $16K for his so I think the asking price here is in line with that. I almost bought that one from the club member but I had too many vehicles at the time so I didn’t. Kind of regret it now.

  10. DENIS

    I like this old girl…however, I don’t see the value creeping much. The model A’s are a great buy-reasonably priced for one in nice restored condition but I don’t see much upside as they are not that popular…just sayin’….nice parade car though.

  11. Kris

    A lot of old roadsters were converted into pickups during WW2 because of gas rationing. Story goes that pickups were either exempt from rationing (due to them being essential vehicles) or that they were given a double ration compared to a passenger car.

    • geomechs geomechs Member

      There were a lot of cars cut up and made into trucks to get more gas rations. If you were on a farm, all the more. I remember seeing a ’34 Pierce Arrow with V-12 that had been cut up to make a truck. That was sickening.

  12. francisco

    The dumb poser in the second picture can get lost and I wouldn’t mind.

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