557 Original Miles! 1990 Chevrolet Camaro IROC Convertible

Wow – it seems like the low mileage, time-warp cars keep coming out of the woodwork. This 1990 Chevrolet Camaro convertible may be one of the lowest specimens left in existence with under 600 original miles. The seller notes this is effectively a brand-new car that still smells like a Camaro sitting on the showroom floor in 1990 would on the inside. The bodywork is pristine, the top is immaculate, and the interior shows zero signs of wear. It’s not surprising there’s one bid at the opening number of $33,000, but will any other bidders step into the ring? Hard to say, but at least there’s no reserve. Find the Camaro here on eBay and located in Illinois.

The seller notes the top has been down exactly once. I’m not sure how you prove such a thing, but given how tidy everything else looks, it also wouldn’t surprise me. The bodywork is also pristine, and one has to wonder how difficult it is to look at a car like this every day and never actually drive it. 1990 marked the final year of the IROC package, and to find it on a convertible is even more rare. According to Hagerty Insurance, just 1,294 IROC-Z convertibles were made in 1990. If that’s indeed true, you can see why the seller perhaps thought it wise to keep this one under wraps.

Then again, when a car has mileage this low, its various special features begin to diminish slightly. Why? Well, you’d be ill-advised to drive it very much, given how much of its value is locked into the fact that it has next to no miles. At this point, the car usually has to be collectible enough to justify never using it and letting it simply sit in your garage as a tribute or as part of larger collection in your own private museum (and then, it really only makes sense to charge an actual admission to the general public, as what’s the point of staring at the same cars every day by yourself?) The interior does indeed look like that of a showroom fresh example, and you can almost smell that new car scent all the way from here.

The seller is confident that the Camaro is likely one of the top three lowest-mileage convertibles in existence, a claim I would find hard to disprove. The Camaro’s engine bay looks pristine, with nary a sign of a cold air intake or aftermarket headers to be found. The seller reports that the Camaro has been kept in temperature controlled storage since Day 1, and he hopes that the next owner will continue the legacy of keeping this one under wraps and away from the perils of modern traffic. So that begs this next question, which is whether you can justify spending upwards of $35,000 (if not more) on a car that will seldom, if ever, be used?

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Comments

  1. Bakyrdhero Bakyrdhero Member

    I’ve listed offer this exact car for most of my life. I don’t remember the seat looking so low budget back when these were new, but coupled with the low buck door panels they really bring the interior down a bit. Still a beautiful specimen that really should t be driven at this point, as much as I hate saying that.

    Like 3
  2. Fred

    Someone bought this and preserved it thinking that cars would never be this awesome again. It seems odd now, but think how bleak performance was in those years.

    Like 2
  3. Keith

    Way too much money for a TPI 305 with a slush box? Wow drive that around with authority and see what street credit you get these days? Not the eighties anymore!…..This Camaro is nothing more than a pretty boy cruiser for a 60 + year old man trying to relive the eighties.

    Like 3
    • Melton

      I have one of these in black, original 305 auto, now manual w/ drivetrain and structural/suspension mods. I bracket race it, autocross it, take it on all day top down country cruises, and even show it off at cars and coffee. It’s one of my all time favorites. That said, this one is waaaay overpriced.

  4. Keith

    Yes nice car but the 350 would have been a far better choice. Might not have been available in the ragtop.I had a 88 IROC T-top car and wife was very happy with it until I traded it on the 89 Turbo Trans Am.

  5. Frank Farrell

    I am utterly perplexed as to why anyone would keep this car and not drive it on the hopes it would be worth something. After all, this isn’t a firebreathing pre 1974 Corvette. This is when car design was essentially at it’s nadir, electronics were in their infancy, and hp was non existent. I don’t get it.

    Like 1
  6. Frank Farrell

    Giving it some thought, here’s a suggestion for all people that buy a car and “store” it, never putting a mile on it, on the hopes it appreciates. Here’s a little math:
    Price of this car new in 1990, about $22,000(all in)
    Value of S&P 500 at the same time, 350
    Current value of this car: ?
    Current value of S&P: 7,650 Appreciation, about 22x

    Is this car worth $448,000? Obviously not. Add into the cost the yearly insurance, storage, etc.
    I’m restoring a 74 Corvette convertible. When I’m done, it’s going to be the pedal to the metal until I die. Only the next buyer benefits when a car(especially a not too important one) is stored forever, least not the owner.

    Like 2
    • 370zpp

      Frank. First, hats off to you for having the ability and the desire to restore that 74.
      Second, you have exactly the right attitude;
      “pedal to the metal until I die”.

      Like 2
  7. Roger h

    Oh there’s no way that I would not drive that car I don’t care how much mileage it has I’m driving it there’s no way I’m going to let a car like that just sit there in my garage while I look at it I’m driving it some people might not there different but I’m going to drive that car I don’t care if it had 30 miles on it who cares if the value goes down I’m the one who paid for it anyways I don’t even care if it was a $75,000 Mopar with no miles on it I’m still driving it

  8. Roger h

    Well there’s no way that I’m not driving that car I don’t care how much mileage is got I’m the one that spent the money on it anyways who cares if the value goes down there’s no way I’m going to let a car like that just sit even if I had a $75,000 Mopar car from back in the day I still would drive it with no mileage I’m still driving it I don’t care that the value go down I’m going to enjoy it you only live once

  9. Howie Mueler

    Ended with 0 bids.

  10. Gary

    I’ve never understood why some would purchase a vehicle of this caliber and not drive it, at least a few miles a month. I don’t know what kind of money it would take to get it back on the road. I imagine it’s going to need some maintenance to be sure it’s ok to drive.
    I buy vehicle I like and I buy them to drive. No garage trophy for me.
    Happy Holidays.

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