Barn Twins! Two 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst Editions

Even today the Hurst Shifter is synonymous with performance, a DIY upgrade with minimal labor, minimal risk, and instant gratification. More than other upgrades, you touch the shifter every time you drive, and it communicates back… driver and machine… working together. In the classic muscle car era, being associated with Hurst demonstrated that manufacturers “got it.” Hurst capitalized on their brand cachet, teaming up with Chrysler and other automakers on special models like this pair of 1970 Chrysler 300 Hurst Edition coupes in Woodstock, Ontario, Canada. After 30 years of barn storage, they seek a new owner here on eBay where an opening bid of $14,999.99 will get the party started. That’s perfect for anyone who refuses to spend $15,000 on a car project.

The 375 HP “TNT” 440 cid (7.2L) beast belies the two-ton Chrysler’s mass. Both 300s feature their original engines and both run! Extra parts come with the sale including fenders, bumpers, and wheels.

A sloppy or rubbery shifter can suck the fun out of rowing your own gears, and a crisp, well-designed shifter with a properly-selected ball or knob can enrich your driving experience for years to come. Ironically these 300 Hurst Edition cars came with automatic transmissions, but they did get a Hurst shifter nonetheless, with optional console. This one features the less-sporting standard column shift.

Hidden headlights were all the rage by 1970 and the 300 is no exception. All 485 of these 1970 300 Hurst Edition cars came in Spinnaker-White with Satin Tan accents on the hood. Other upgrades include the pong-ready fiberglass hood with specific scoop and hood pins.

The not-quite identical twins await a new home where, hopefully, another lengthy slumber can be avoided. Would you make one 300 from this package deal or two?

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Johnmloghry Johnmloghry Member

    Not a Mopar fan, so won’t make comment.
    God bless America

    Like 4
    • Chris M.

      Too late!

      Like 11
  2. Arthell64 Member

    Would be a neat car to restore for sure.

    Like 3
  3. Keith

    Looks like someone is trying to clean out their garage or backyard for a 15k profit, uhmmmmmmm no thanks!

    Like 2
    • Crazyhawk

      Promote what you love, don’t bash what you hate.

      Like 13
  4. Sal

    I’m not sure why.. (though i’d really dig that hood and trunk lid on my 71 NY’er) but these cars seem to go for pretty good money. With both cars and a pile of parts, I think he is at least in the ball park price wise. Granted it would have to be someone that wanted a C body, you’d never make a profit with these cars.

    One question… why does the car with the super clean floors have to be the one with a dent in every body panel?

    Like 1
  5. Arby

    Reminds me of the B-52s…

    Like 1
    • James Martin

      Ya where is the bucket seats floor Hurst shifter? Why would they be Hurst with out shifter? Seems fishy. did they make them with bench seat colum shift?

      • Sal

        Someone can probably tell the story better then I…
        but both Chrysler and Hurst dropped the ball on this model. Each thought the other party was handling more then they actually did. IIRC I don’t think any of these cars actually received a Hurst shifter.

      • Jonesridge Member

        495 or so were made. About 10% were floor-shift/console cars.
        As to why anyone would want these? Drive one and you would know, they are awesome road cars. Long trips are really fun, having driven one for 10+ years around the country to Chrysler 300 Club Intl. meets, I know. Fun grocery getter also.
        Sorry I ever sold mine…

        Like 4
      • Bryan

        The 300 Hursts were equipped with an Imperial leather bucket seat interior…standard. The 440 TNT engine with a column shift 727 automatic transmission was standard as well; the rare floor shift was an option.

  6. john

    Not sure they ever came with the column shifter. There would be no HURST shifter for that.

    • Jonesridge Member

      All were built with the column shifter steering column. If the Console option was installed, it went to the detail area at the end of the line and the column shift lever was removed, the attachment hub was hack-sawed off the column hub and the shift levers at the base of the column were taped to the frame underneath. Also, the Chrysler was slightly narrower than the Imperial and the Bucket seats rubbed against the console.

  7. art

    I’ll chip in the penny!

  8. TimM

    A par for that money seems like a good deal!!

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.