Basement Storage: 1951 Crosley Station Wagon

What a shame: this 1951 Crosley station wagon was ready for restoration, with the body completely diassembled and acid dipped before the owner fell ill and lost the will to complete the project. It’s now seeminglty taking up space in a downstairs garage, stuck in storage like an old couch. Find it here on craigslist somewhere in Oregon for $1,850, and go here if the ad is archived.

Crosley’s entire lineup was memorable, from the compact wagons like this car to the Hot Shot roadster. They built good vehicles, even if a bit small in stature. While they remain an enthusiast favorite today, values haven’t crept past excessive levels making projects like this station wagon completely attainable, but not likely to promise a major return on the ensuing work that needs to happen.

The seller includes what is possibly an as-discovered or as-purchased photo, showing the Crosley with tired, mismatched paint and flat tires. The Crosley is notable as being the country’s first all-steel station wagon, and although small, it was quite affordable. The rear seats could be folded up against the front to create extra luggage room, perhaps a precursor as to what would become standard in today’s minivans.

You might say the hard work has already been done, and the next owner will just have to re-assemble the Crosley and paint it. It’s never that simple, however, but at least you’re starting with a rust-free shell. No word on whether the station wagon has the rear door option or standard two-piece tailgate, but hopefully the seller has all of the original parts regardless.

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Comments

  1. jw454

    That first picture made it a bit tough to see the car at first. There’s still interest in these so it should find a home.

    3
  2. grant

    Neat car. It’s in Forest Grove, a nice little city about 25 miles west of Portland.

  3. SAM61

    Here’s a novel, stupid, silly idea…you pick.

    Find a totaled trike…Honda Goldwing, Harley, etc. Engine up front, longer drive train, etc. Bada bing!

    1
  4. Beatnik Bedouin

    Sadly, for me, I really can’t justify another project, otherwise I’d get one of my childhood friends to go and sort out a sale for the li’l Croseley wagon. He happens to live in Portland.

    I always had a soft spot for the marque, especially after having a chance to meet Lloyd Taylor, designer of the CoBra engine, back in the 1970s. His knowledge of engine design was amazing, even if his sheetmetal engine wasn’t really designed to be used in an automotive application.

    2
  5. Ikey Heyman

    Wow, judging from the disorganized mess in and around the body of this car, how likely is it that everything is there to make a “complete” car, as stated? Would love to see it on the road (moving as fast as 27 HP can move it) – best of luck to the person that tackles this project.

    2
  6. Howard A
    • Howard A

      Sorry about the double dragster posts, having trouble posting, but seems ok now, Thanks, Jesse. Still, these gassers are really cool.

      1
      • John

        Not cool

        2
  7. Ben T. Spanner

    Powell Crosley was into a lot of things; radio broadcasting and radios, automobiles, and refigerators. He developed the Crosley Shelvadoor, maybe the first refrigerator with shelves in the door. The Crosley Hot Shot or Supersport was one of the first street cars with disk brakes.

    My friend in the late 60’s drove a Supersport with a Lancia crash box transmission. It felt fast.

    1
    • Howard A

      I find it odd, Crosley’s never had Crosley radios, they were Motorola. My parents had a Crosley refrigerator, and it was green.

  8. Lance

    Howard, Powell Crosley had already sold Crosley radio before he entered the car biz in 1939. He really didn’t care what brand of radio were installed in Crosleys by then.

    2

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