BF AUCTION: 1964 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Convertible

High Bid: $1,050 | 18 hrs leftBid Now

It seems like the Germans get all the attention when it comes to air-cooled cars these days, but they weren’t the only ones that experimented with ditching antifreeze. With Porsche 911 prices at an all-time high, it sure makes Chevy’s adventure into the world of rear-engined air-cooled six-cylinder powered cars seem like serious bargains. If you’ve been thinking about giving the Corvair life a try, Reader Jens K has decided it’s time to part ways with this 1964 Monza Convertible and he’s offering it here as a Barn Finds Auction!

The Corvair is often compared to the Porsche 911, they are even frequently called the Poor-man’s Porsche. It’s easy to see where the comparison comes from given that both have six-cylinder air-cooled engines mounted in the back, but beyond that, the two are quite different. The Porsche was never built to be affordable basic transportation, it was a truly niche car from day one. The Corvair, on the other hand, was meant to be a novel but affordable car for regular people to drive. Whether Chevy really achieved that is something we can debate at another time, but one thing is for sure, restoring one of these will cost you a fraction of what a Porsche will!

Here’s a look at GM’s air-cooled engine! Jens notes that this one runs great. It needs a new alternator but is otherwise ready to go. Jens has paperwork from the previous owner that shows a ton of work was done to the engine back in 2006. Since it’s a handwritten invoice, it’s hard to tell, but it appears that the engine was given a full rebuild. 1964 was a good year for the Corvair, as Chevrolet updated the suspension and engine. The addition of transverse leaf springs in the back, a front sway bar, and softer rear coil springs improved the car’s handling characteristics and made it a much more neutral car to drive. The improved handling also allowed for more power, so engine displacement was increased to 164 cui. Being the semi-sporty Monza model means that this engine is good for 110 horsepower. That might be 20 less than the 1964 Porsche 911 came with, but considering a nice one of those will set you back over $100k these days, I think I could make due with 110 horses.

This Monza has clearly been cared for but driven. The interior is starting to show its age, with some split seams and signs of wear. It looks usable as is, but to make it a really exceptional driver, you will want to freshen up the interior. With the top-down and a fresh interior, this one will be a blast to cruise around in!

Cosmetically, this Corvair appears to be in decent shape. Jens points out a few rust spots that need addressing, but he also was sure to provide a look at the worst area plus photos of the underside and trunk floor so that you can see that it is structurally in solid shape. The spot pictured will definitely need attention and will require some cutting and welding, but it shouldn’t be impossible to fix.

While it isn’t perfect, this Corvair really looks like it could be a great classic to have. I know it’s a bit cliche to compare the Corvair to the 911, or to any Porsche really, but when there are so many similarities it’s hard not too! While it might seem like an affordable alternative, it really is a different experience that should be appreciated for what it is. And that’s a unique American classic! So, if you’ve got the air-cooled itch and want something truly unique, be sure to bid on this Monza. If you have any questions for Jens, please leave them in the comments below.

  • Location: Winter Haven, Florida
  • Mileage: 99,875
  • Title Status: Clean
  • VIN: 40967W259300

Bid On This Vehicle

High Bid: $1,050 (Reserve Not Met)
Make An Offer
Ended: Feb 11, 2020 1:00pm
Top Bidder: mathnerd
Buyer Premium: 5%
  •   
    mathnerd bid $1,050.00Feb 7, 2020 2:53pm
  •   
    Gravybob bid $950.00Feb 5, 2020 5:39pm
  •   
    waynearny bid $700.00Feb 5, 2020 4:19pm
  •   
    Dro72 bid $600.00Feb 5, 2020 2:47am
  •   
    Fire69dem bid $500.00Feb 4, 2020 9:03pm

Auction your car here on Barn Finds!

Have something similar for sale? List it here on Barn Finds!

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. Roger Hackney

    The suspension upgrades didn’t come
    until 1965 along with the restyled body.

    • Josh Mortensen Josh Mortensen Staff

      Are you sure Roger? All the sources I’ve looked at show that the rear suspension improvements came out on the ’64. I definitely could be wrong on that though. If you have any sources on that, please share!

      5
    • DayDreamBeliever Member

      Roger,
      The ’64 had added components to the original swing axle design, that were put in to reduce the camber change and range of motion in the swing axle design. So Josh does have a point.

      With the 2nd generation cars beginning in 1965, a complete redesign of the rear suspension brought a true IRS setup, very similar to the C2 Corvettes.

  2. On and On Gregg Wellner Member

    Actually Roger they did. The addition of a transverse leaf spring and sway bar upgrades and spring rates cured the handling issues addressed in bad press at the time. 1965 saw a whole new suspension based on Corvette IRS. These are fun cars to own and drive. My issues with this particular one are the rust problems and any rubber hoses or fuel filters in the engine compartment. If a belt was to break and fly there will be ‘Fire in the kitchen’. This will sell cheap and someone who is more astute and mechanical will have a great summer driver. I love mine.

    9
    • Rick Jones

      If I could drive this car home I would put in a bid. Would you be willing to put in a new or one that works so the car is drivable
      Thanks for your response, Rick.

  3. Steve Bush

    Saw a very nice 1966 model here in Cleveland last summer. Much nicer than this one. Medium green with wire wheel covers and the black bucket seat interior driven by a lady with her two young kids. The top was down but I believe she said it was white. It had a few fairly minor imperfections but presented as well as most newer cars. It didn’t smoke or make any bad noises and looked to drive smoothly.

    3
  4. leiniedude leiniedude Member

    Hey Ken, this is in your back yard. Top down fun buddy!

  5. Little_Cars Little_Cars Member

    This is a dead ringer for the black 64 convert my dad and I restored in our driveway back in the 70s. At the time I thought it was unusual to have the teal/turquoise interior on a black car. We took a direct hit in the front one sunny day and sourced a whole front clip from another Corvair to fix. This allowed us to repaint it a second time with a better quality black finish. IF this car had an automatic, I’d be thinking it was our ol’ ragtop.

    2
  6. Peter

    When was the last time this car was driven? Thanks.

  7. jimmy the orphan

    I have a 63′ 150hp. turbo spyder and a 66′ corsa 180hp turbo. The IRS didn’t come out till 65′. New body, full size 4speed trans. ect. Made it a whole different car, however the 63′ or 64′ Monza or Monza spyder are great little cars in their own right. My dad bought my mom a new Monza in 63′, that cream white color with darker tan interior. I was ten yrs. old and begged dad to get the cool spyder I read about in road and track. Dad was a very kind man. Let me down easy. Bought the Monza with the 4 speed. Mom could drive a stick as well as anyone and used the car till I was 16 then turned it over to me. It was always was kept inside and had 30 some k. miles on it. Like new. I drove it like a 16 year old, never had a problem with the handling. Fun cars. Later………………………………JIMMY

    2
  8. Loudmouth

    Could this be driven after alternator is replaced.

  9. Little_Cars Little_Cars Member

    Never had one new, family owned four 61 wagons, a 62 Monza sedan, a 63 Monza sedan painted like a fire chief’s car, two 64 converts, 65 Corsa coupe, 65 Monza sedan with Corsa upgrades, 66 Monza coupe and two 68 Monza coupes.

    Our blue 61 Corvair 700 Lakewood came close to feeling brand new…best running little 80 hp wagon that needed nothing to add to it’s cute factor, and practical factor! Used it to haul a go cart. The only problem with the cargo area was how high we had to lift the cart to get it in and shut the lift gate. Oh, and oil spots from the lawnmower engine.

  10. Del

    The Germans saved their anti- freeze for the Eastern Front, but it still failed.

    I want this car but my Uncle Mr. Nader will not lend me the cash.😎🍺

  11. Bill T

    Having corvairs in my life for over 45 years I can tell you first hand that the rust you see is just tip of the iceberg. With rust like in those photos there maybe a lot of rust you CAN’T see that should be a consideration before you bid. Yes Clarks and others sell many replacement panels however keep in mind the Corvair is Uni-body car and the panels that can’t be welded in have to be fabricated. Unless you are doing this yourself, the cost, and finding someone to do it right can be a challenge at best. If you have your heart set on a 1964 Covair Monza look at the prices of the ones that have been done already, or low mileage examples before you bid too much on a project car. You maybe pleasantly surprised what $10K can buy, and it’s very easy to spend $10K fixing up a rusty Corvair. I know, my family has dozens of them.

    1
  12. TimM

    Cool looking car but not my cup of tea!! Would be a fun driver in the summer with the top down though!!!

  13. Major Thom

    This same car was sold on Facebook marketplace just a week or two ago. Wonder if the seller is a flipper, or had a change of heart after buying it…

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.