Big Rear Window: 1958 GMC 100

Classic trucks are hot and getting hotter by the day. I find myself drawn more and more towards picking up a 1950’s pickup and turning it into a modern street machine. The style is just so fantastic and the possibilities are endless. This 1958 GMC “Big Back Window” long bed originally found in Oklahoma is now listed in Denton, Texas here on eBay and has a few things going for it that might get some real interest. 

It’s a GMC sporting the big rear window, the original V8 engine, Hydra-matic transmission and a Climatic Air Custom A/C with Eureka Heater. The listing seems to downplay the rust spots which at first glance don’t seem to be a problem. Based on some of the photos though I’d have some concerns about a few spots and would be taking a closer look. The bed has a desirable patina but the cab was protected by a “light wash of house paint” which even thought it may have done the job, will need to be removed and probably means the patina look won’t be possible.

The big back window which wraps around the cab is definitely a nice feature, as is the original interior which although worn and missing the dome light, seems mostly intact. Unfortunately, looks like there is no title and it’s bill of sale only. Restorers and hot-rodders typically lean towards the short box and stepside models rather than the long box like this one. Not sure if the big back window and original parts would make up for the lack of proof of ownership and the longer box. The starting price is $4,000, it will be very interesting to see how high it goes.

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Comments

  1. Michael

    Nice to see the original Pontiac V-8 still installed. Probably has the dual coupling hydramatic 4 speed trans also. Very potent mill back in 1958.

  2. Terry J

    I see the V8 emblem on the fender. 336 cu in Pontiac I think. Good tough engine, but hard to find parts I suppose. Looks like a 3 on the tree. :-) Terry J

    • Dave Wright

      Why would it be hard to find parts for? Pontiac built the same basic engine from 55 into the 80’s simply changing bore, stroke and intake systems. Probably the second most common engine to a small block in the GM lineup.

      • Terry J

        “All Pontiac V8s from 1955 to 1959 were reverse cooled, known as the “gusher” cooling system. It was removed from the design for the 1960 model year because designers moved the generator and the power steering pump from atop the front of the engine down to the front of the heads to accommodate a lower hoodline. However, the 1959 389 engines had the generator in front of the heads with reverse flow cooling still in use. This suggests that the cost of the reverse cooling was the reason for the change to “equa-flow” cooling”.
        I used to think small block Chevys were all the same too. Know better now. The 336 was a smaller bore 370. Terry J

      • geomechs geomechs Member

        The GMC/Pontiac engine is a little more difficult to get parts for than the Chevrolet side of the coin, but they’re available–consequently more expensive. Actually a good engine throughout the line. They tend to seep oil from all over but that marvelous invention called RTV sealer helps keep most of the lube inside where it’s supposed to be (It will always manage to seep past that wick rear seal and mark its spot on the driveway though.). Continuous high rpm tends to make them drop vavles, but then, I’ve witnessed a lot of motors drop valves, even SBCs. I have to admit that I was never a big fan of the V-6 that came out in ’60 to replace the Poncho motor. I always thought of it as a plodding, boring boat anchor but most buyers disagreed with me as it dominated GMC for the better part of that decade.

  3. Sparkster

    This truck will be a Rat Rod at the 2018 SEMA show in Las Vegas next year. I bet the a/c and heating system is worth a lot of money. $4000 ??? I don’t think so.

  4. Rube Goldberg Member

    I always wonder where these people come up with the initial asking price. Is there some kind of publication titled ” The Inflated Price Guide for Rusty Classics”? It will be nice if the fad for these passes,( as is, they really aren’t that much fun to drive) so regular schmoes like me could buy one again.

  5. Hide Behind

    No problem on engine or trannys parts to rebuild , as others noted same darn engine block those years and if not original nut, poncho engines in 389-400 especially, quite common.
    IMPROVEMENTS THROUGH YEARS WERE MAINLY MINOR, oil pumps volumn and pressure and return, valve sizes, cams .
    And do not quote me, but think there was some clearance letting on block webbing of larger cu in eng.
    This is one very interesting site with some very knowlegable people. I am old school and interest petered out on most all autos after 70’s smoggers came about.
    Only fastest or uniqe of any after that.

  6. The sultan of smith

    I am the owner of the vehicle. The GMC long bed big back window with the 336 and hydramatic is pretty rare. anyone know anything on the air conditioning system. I have scoured to find anything but have not.

  7. Scot Douglas

    Rain gutter partially rusted away. Nice truck, but you’d need to have a lot of time and patience to return this to its former glory.

    Actually, I’m glad it’s in Texas and not closer to Michigan. :)

  8. DAN TERFEHR

    A little rusty but a GREAT LOOKING truck. It would make a cool cruiser. Best Wishes to the seller.

  9. stillrunners lawrence Member

    Not that rare….for around our area…

  10. Hide Behind

    Not that rare in Wa woods or farmlands.

  11. Joe

    What did it sell for ?

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