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Brand New! 1967 Ford Mustang

Regular readers know I strongly lean toward retaining most classics in their factory specifications and appearance via preservation or restoration. However, I will seldom ignore a custom build, particularly if its creator manages to maintain the car’s inherent character. That is the case with this 1967 Ford Mustang Fastback. The seller describes its condition as brand new, and that phrase seems well justified. It has undergone changes to its paint and drivetrain, but it still exudes the unmistakable aura of a classic First Generation Mustang. It would suit someone seeking a high-end classic that is equally comfortable on the road or the show circuit. The Fastback is listed here on eBay in Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. Bidding currently sits below the reserve at $51,100.

The seller states that this Mustang presents superbly following a recent rotisserie restoration. However, some enthusiasts would be justified in classing it as a refurbishment courtesy of the modifications performed during the build. The first is the paint shade because the original Lime Gold has made way for stunning Dark Moss Green. The builder applied the fresh coat over panels that are laser-straight and rust-free. The process included replacing the rear quarter panels, floor pans, torque boxes, frame rails, doors, front fenders, hood, and trunk lid. The result is a bodyshell that is as solid today as when it rolled off the line and has an underside that presents as beautifully as the exterior. The seller admits the paint has a couple of minor scratches and marks, but the new owner could have these addressed relatively easily. Achieving a color match can sometimes be challenging, but the age of this paint should reduce that risk. The seller eliminated every badge during the build but ensured the remaining trim and glass were spotless. The Fastback rolls on new 15″ American Racing Torq Thrust wheels that perfectly suit the car’s character.

The VIN and Data Plate confirm the original owner ordered this Fastback with a C-Code 289ci V8, sending 200hp to the road via a three-speed automatic transmission. Although it offered performance that satisfied many, that combination was the least potent available in a V8-equipped Mustang in 1967. That would never be satisfactory in a build of this caliber, so the 289 and auto are gone, with their place occupied by a 302ci powerplants and a five-speed Tremec manual transmission. In keeping with the theme of tasteful upgrades, that sweet little motor features a 0.030″ overbore, aluminum cylinder heads, flat-top pistons, an upgraded camshaft, a complete MSD ignition system, and a Holley 600cfm Performance carburetor. They sensibly added a three-row aluminum radiator to keep the engine cool, and with 350hp and 330 ft/lbs of torque under the driver’s right foot, a low-14-second ¼-mile ET should be within their grasp. The TLC didn’t end there, with the suspension system rebuilt with new OEM bushes and other steering components. The power front disc brakes received similar attention, and the power steering features a new Borgeson steering box. My only qualm with this spotless engine bay is the proximity of the radiator overflow hose to the engine fan. It is far closer than I feel is appropriate, and I would reroute it fairly quickly to avoid a potential disaster. The seller states the Mustang runs and drives perfectly and that the overdrive fifth gear makes it an ideal freeway cruiser. They supply this YouTube video that features a walkaround, allowing us to hear the motor start and run. It sounds as crisp and clean as you would rightly expect, considering the recent work.

The theme of stunning presentation extends beyond the exterior and engine bay, with this Fastback’s interior bordering on perfect. There are no signs of wear or abuse and nothing worthy of criticism. It hosts many aftermarket additions, but the seller integrated them seamlessly to ensure the original character was not compromised excessively. They include later front bucket seats, an aftermarket console with integrated cupholders, a tilt wheel, a Dakota Digital gauge cluster with tachometer, a Hurst shifter, and a modern AM/FM radio/CD player with USB input. They retained standard features like the genuine roof console with map lights but didn’t add luxury touches like air conditioning. The interior needs nothing and should be a pleasant place to spend many hours as the miles roll effortlessly under the tires.

This 1967 Mustang Fastback possesses the “wow” factor and the muscle to match its good looks. The few cosmetic defects are minor, and a good paint shop should have no problems addressing them to a high standard. It is more than a pretty face, with the mechanical upgrades promising excellent performance and a relaxed open-road cruising experience. One of the challenges with modified classics is estimating their potential value or reserve price. However, we might have some insight because I located a previous listing where the car failed to reach the reserve despite the bidding hitting $63,600. The seller may have dropped their reserve, but that isn’t guaranteed. I know that doesn’t make it an affordable classic, but would you consider pursuing this stunning Mustang further if you had the funds available?

Comments

  1. Avatar photo rik

    its a 68

    Like 10
    • Avatar photo Big C

      Wrong. ’68 had side marker lights in the front.

      Like 10
      • Avatar photo Adam P

        You’re both right. It has 68-type rear quarters with the side marker lights and the “gills,” behind the doors sealed off but has 67 front fenders without the marker lights. Oops.

        Like 9
      • Avatar photo Frank D Member

        I owned two 67 Mustangs. This is a 68, the 67 had two small three fin like fake painted grills in each quarter panel. 1968 was the first year for side markers in most American cars. 1967 front fenders. So much for originality! It’s still a very nice looking Mustang.

        Like 0
      • Avatar photo RLV

        Something fishy here. Reserve too expensive for a car with combined ’67 and ’68 sheet metal. The lights showed at all four corners in the ’68 model year. Wouldn’t touch 51k. Good looker, though.

        Like 3
      • Avatar photo Mark_K Member

        It’s got 68 side scoops too. 67s didn’t have rear side markers either. Basically its a 68 with 67 front fenders.

        Like 4
      • Avatar photo Stan

        Weird 2.79 gear w no trac-lok. Talk about hwy only in mind.

        Like 1
    • Avatar photo jrhmobile

      Gotta agree with Big C here. That doesn’t look like the “stock” rear marker for a 68 ‘Stang, which has a chrome bezel and more rounded edges.

      Why it was added? I do not know. But it’s there, and it’s definitely an add-on that I would say doesn’t belong there for a ’67 Mustang restoration.

      Like 4
      • Avatar photo Boatman Member

        Shouldn’t be there at all. But, this car is far from original, so why not?

        Like 1
      • Avatar photo Karl

        The chrome rounded edge markers were from the Cougar, and were used on “Strike” cars. This car has the standard Mustang markers.

        Like 0
    • Avatar photo Dave Goodlander

      For 60 grand I don’t get a grill?

      Like 4
      • Avatar photo jrhmobile

        No, but you get those poor knockoff Bullitt license plates, so there’s that.

        Like 1
    • Avatar photo Yblocker

      68s had front side marker lights, no rear side marker lights, only reflectors. 67s had no side markers of any kind.

      Like 2
      • Avatar photo Yblocker

        The rear side marker lights on this car are aftermarket, or from a different car all together.

        Like 1
  2. Avatar photo Jay E. Member

    With a 2.79 rear end and a 302 engine, this is going to be a slug at a drag strip. I’d put in taller gears, it already has a 5 speed to give highway performance.
    A very nice car,,,

    Like 5
    • Avatar photo Rw

      Lower gears it has talk gears

      Like 4
  3. Avatar photo Phipps

    This guy did literally exactly what I would do in a perfect world

    Like 3
  4. Avatar photo Bob_in_TN Member

    Very nice build. Clean and attractive.

    Like 9
  5. Avatar photo Karl

    The chrome rounded edge markers were from the Cougar, and were used on “Strike” cars. This car has the standard Mustang markers.

    Like 1
  6. Avatar photo Rickirick

    Certainly a beauty & my fav color is green. But Adam, being a Mustang freak, that 302 small block was not the biggest most powerful engine for ’67. The 390/325hp w/427 torque was put in just over 10,000 late model yr. 67’s & carried into the ’68 yr. And it had upgrades galore, making it a hi performance powerplant. Regardless, nice write up. Someone’s gonna get quite a ride.

    Like 5
  7. Avatar photo Marko

    Perfect for stalking 1968 Chargers !

    Like 7
  8. Avatar photo mike hayes

    If the guy had an offer like that , he shoul have takin it .

    Like 3
  9. Avatar photo Big Bear 🇺🇸

    Beautiful looking Mustang. But if I had a choice in engines on this build. I would go with a modify 390 horsepower above 425 and torque at 500. With those 2.79 gears it’s a hiway runner. 5 speed most likely have a tall 1st gear to launch it. If not I would go 3:73 gears and boy it would be fun. I know 390 is heaver than the 302. But there is a big difference in the two in power. Good luck to the seller. 🇺🇸🐻

    Like 1
  10. Avatar photo BigDaddyBonz

    No reason to nit pick. It’s a beautiful car that almost everyone would love to own. Unfortunately I have neither the room or the funds for another classic. Very nice resto.

    Like 5
  11. Avatar photo J. Michael

    What a beauty! She’s up to an even $80k as of this writing with 5 days 13 hours left with the reserve behind so it will be fun to watch where it goes from here.

    Like 2
  12. Avatar photo Neil R Norris

    She’s a real looker for sure. And I bet it’s oodles of fun. But I take issue with the often very liberal misuse of the word “restoration” … this is a beauty. But it is not a “restoration”.

    Like 1
  13. Avatar photo Rickmaxey

    My Uncle was a supervisor at Ford and I would like to tell whoever what I ask him Where are the front marker lights look at this brochure From FORD somebody forget what they were doing As he laughed he told me that the first few hundred produce in July of 67 for the 68 production run had 67 fenders because there was a delay in stamping the new 68 fenders SO is that way your daughters 68 does not have front fender marker lights still laughing at me YES hers was number 85 off line for the 68 run. Looking at his brother my Dadvyou know he is really shap and paying attention to detail to be 10 years old Dad said well look at all of the family that he gets it from HE thinks he has to inspect ever little detail I said so one day those different 68s will be worth more His daughters 68 Gt Fastback was put in the basement next day as a replaced it with a later run model Later sold it paid house off and built her one paid in full one car for 2 houses and I ended up with a 1970 MACH 1 GT COBRA JET. FORD BLUE BLACK STRIPS WITH WHITE INSIDE. It was a beast was stupid kid and got rid of it

    Like 0
  14. Avatar photo JoeNYWF64

    Unless these RWL BFG’s were laying around in the garage from a prev car, to me, it makes no sense to spend twice or even 3x’s!! as much for RWL tires today, only to mount/hide the raised whites side on the INside like on this Stang.
    Even today’s BFG’s are old tech S or at most T rated tires. While blackwall tires $70 or even $60 are H rated or better with superior tread design & handling.

    Like 1

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