Disclosure: This site may receive compensation when you click on some links and make purchases.

Covered 15 Years: 1969 Ford Galaxie 500 Convertible

In full-size automobile competition in the 1960s, Chevrolet usually outsold Ford. But when it came to convertibles in 1969, they were evenly matched. Ford delivered 14,312 Galaxie 500 and 500XL drop-tops while Chevy sold 14,415 Impalas (there was no SS convertible). This ’69 Galaxie 500 canvas top Ford looks quite nice, but that’s because it’s been largely covered for the past 15 years. Located in a garage in Columbus, Kansas, it doesn’t run and will have to be towed. The big Ford is available here on craigslist for $21,000, Our thanks to Gunter Kramer for more great tip sleuthing!

Ford redesigned its Custom/Galaxie/LTD lineup in 1969, continuing the use of horizontal headlights introduced in 1968 (1965-67 big Fords had stacked peepers). They rode on a 121-inch wheelbase and came with a variety of engines, including the 390 cubic inch “big block” in the seller’s car. This one has a 4-barrel carburetor and an automatic transmission, so if you got down on the throttle, you didn’t miss too many gas stations.

Though idle for the last decade and a half (why?), this Galaxie 500 certainly doesn’t look it. One of the photos shows it with a car cover over it, suggesting it was protected from the elements all this time. The body shows no rust and only one spot where the finish is an issue (might be an earlier repaint). We suspect the owner was beginning to restore the car and then stopped. The interior has been redone (not in original materials) and we’re told the top is brand new.

A new set of tires also adorns the vehicle, but it doesn’t look like any time has been spent trying to get the motor going. If it’s been sitting so long, the fuel system probably needs cleaning out, perhaps even including the need for a new gas tank. But that won’t be known without getting it up on a lift to see what needs sorting out. At 84,000 miles, it could be that the engine/transmission may have internal issues as well. But what a neat car this would be out on a summertime cruise when set right again.

Comments

  1. CraigR

    Stiff price for a non runner

    Like 13
    • Yblocker

      VWs are bringing this kind of money, I’ll take this over a “running” Bug any day lol

      Like 13
    • John Morrissey

      Agree……. it looks great, but you might need to spend $10k more on it, plus cost to trailer it home.
      Too much money !
      Too bad, this would make a great weekend cruiser.

      Like 7
  2. Cam W.

    Relatively presentable driver-quality Galaxie 500 convertibles start about $10K, with nicer ones selling around $15K. Show-quality versions can go for alot more. These are fairly plentiful, so there are lots of others on the market to compare.
    As noted, this car will likely need a complete overhaul of the fuel system. Likely same for brakes, electrics, cooling, and so-on.
    This car would be a solid project for someone……. If it was priced right.
    I would value this one at about $8K.

    Like 14
    • RICK W

      In early 80s, I bought a 72 LTD convert. Installed new roof with GLASS window at a local GLASS and Trim shop (try to find one now) which also found exact vinyl for worn drivers seat! Paid for winter storage for three years and enjoyed top down cruising in the summer. Finally decided it was impractical to keep. One of several cars I wish I had kept 😫. Ford always seemed to be a step ahead with converts. Remember the Skyliner 🤔 with retractable hard top. 👍

      Like 8
  3. Chris Cornetto

    I think this unit is a bit pricey and the interior color makes me want to get my hair done. I wonder if it has an air freshener in Aquanet. In all fairness, it is not an XL. The car has few options. The chrome looks so so. The car does not run. I would just move on, as there are still quite a few of these around.

    Like 7
    • Gary

      Looks like a clock delete.

      Like 1
  4. Harrison Reed

    It sure isn’t an XL! The XL had a different grille with a horizontal bar through the middle, and hiding headlights (the latter an invitation to vacuum leaks). I once drove a 1969 L.T.D. (The 1970 was prettier, but horrible for structural rust behind the rear wheels!). My 1969 had a 429 under the hood — and when they took the lead out of the gas and lowered the octane, it knocked if accelerated with any spirit. You could re-set the timing to compensate for that — but then you lost horsepower drastically and suffered a rough idle. Not a set of headaches I chose to continue.

    Like 2
    • Yblocker

      Nobody said it was an XL. READ! Lol

      Like 3
    • Robert Atkinson, Jr.

      The unleaded gas got better later, and electronic engine controls for fuel and spark can do a lot to cure the issues with engine knock, along with hardened valve seats and valve guides, to compensate for the loss of the lead in the fuel. The low octane unleaded gas was why the compression ratios were lowered starting in 1970. In 1970, the EPA mandated that all new cars had to be able to run on unleaded gasoline, in anticipation of the catalytic converters to come starting in 1975. The lowered compression ratios reduced the tendency to knock, at the expense of engine power, which is why by 1975, a Ford 429 V8 made about 160 horsepower by 1975, well down from 325 horsepower in 1969.

      Like 3
  5. Zen

    A 390 4bbl in a 69 Galaxie convertible, with A/C, I think it’s pretty nice, although the replacement interior is a bit loud, to say the least. I like it. Still, it should be running and drivable at that price.

    Like 7
    • Erich

      That’s why you put the top down, to show off that snazzy interior Lol

      Like 0
  6. Rex Kahrs Rex Kahrs Member

    The Ford body designs of this period (68-onward) were definitely not a high point for Ford. Even the convertible part and the 390 can’t overcome the boring body. And then there’s that interior….

    Dig the 69 Newport Convertible.

    Like 0
    • Big C

      My great aunt Edith dug hers.

      Like 0
  7. Robert Atkinson, Jr.

    A bit pricey for a car that hasn’t run in fifteen (15) years, but it has a lot of potential if someone can get it at the right price. It will need brakes rebuilt at all four (4) wheels, along with the master cylinder, vacuum booster and all of the lines flushed and/or replaced. Ditto for the fuel system, with a carb cleaning and rebuild and replacement of the gas tank, fuel pump and fuel lines to get it running. I’d buy a new gas tank that has provisions for a return line to be fitted for a future fuel injection system. Finish the list with a transmission and rear end service, to go with new shocks and suspension bits, and new tires to get it safely drivable again. I figure that list should run to between $3k and $5k, so the purchase price is critical to making the deal work.

    Like 3
  8. Billyray

    That’s a surprising factoid that Ford sold as many converts in 1969 as Chevy! 😎 Nice car, but for that price should be running smoothly.

    Like 2
  9. Dale L

    I actually had a friend who bought one of these ’69’s new, in a medium blue color, with a white top. He first showed it to me, on a sunny winter day, We were entering Interstate 35W, and he dropped the top at about 15 mph.The heater was on high, and the front side windows were up. I believe the temperature was in the upper 30’s. Young, and dumb, but it sure was fun.

    Like 7
  10. Dan

    The asking price reflects the fact that these were notoriously known to rust and the seller knows there are very few left. I like that it has a big block but to install that gaudy interior and not make an effort to get this car running again is concerning.

    Like 2
    • Erich

      Others on here are commenting that there are plenty of these yet to go around, I, like you, disagree. This model was my first car but mine had the upstate NY flapping rear quarter option from only about 6 tours of rust belt winters. As a first car I’m always on high alert to spot others like it, and I can count them on one hand. Pricey, agreed. Plentiful, no.

      Like 2
  11. yachtsmanbill

    I think the last road trip made as down to Tijuana for that interior job for $500. Whew; pretty bright!

    Like 2
  12. Elmo

    I love my Fords but FE = Friggin’ Expensive.

    Like 0
    • Robert Atkinson, Jr.

      Expensive to feed and to fix, LOL! Great motors for the time, but you could count on a least a valve job after 100k miles, and possibly a full overhaul. Modern design and metallurgy being what it is, modern engines last far longer. As for fuel economy, again, not bad for the era, but modern engines put them to shame. The 390 in my mom’s ’67 T-Bird consistently got 17 mpg, city or highway, it didn’t matter! Some modern upgrades (electronic ignition and EFI) would help, but they’ll never get 40 mpg no matter what you do! It’s a big-block V8, it’ll pass everything but a gas station, LOL!

      Like 1
  13. Troy

    I would do the same as the seller list it high and see who bites like anything else cash talks I would love to have it, I don’t have a garage to keep it in.

    Like 0
  14. David Cook

    In the fall of 1968 my neighbor ordered a new Galaxie 500 convertible. What I found odd with this car was they ordered it with a 302 V8, but a 3 speed manual transmission on the column, manual steering and brakes. I don’t believe that I ever saw another one quite like it. They drove the car for nearly 10 years and here in Wisconsin, it was quite rusty.

    Like 0
    • Yblocker

      Everything is rusty after 10 years in Wisconsin

      Like 0
  15. C Force

    Might as well bank on having to rebuild the motor and probably the trans as well.speaking from experience having built and run a 390 4v in my 72 F250 they are a little pricey to build and are real gas guzzlers,especially if you start doing performance upgrades.Mine had around 365hp and got about 7mpg.The 390 in this one would be around 315hp with 10:1cr.They are reliable and i never had any issues except the poor mileage.

    Like 0
  16. Big C

    ’69 big Ford’s are rare to begin with. Converts even more. I’d like it to run, but if it’s clean underneath? Definitely worth it.

    Like 1

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks.

Become a member to add images to your comments.

*

Get new comment updates via email. Or subscribe without commenting.