No Reserve Flathead: 1952 Ford F3

Despite hailing from Canada, this 1952 Ford F3 pickup remains in sound condition and an easy candidate for restoration or simply driving as-is. Rust spots are minor and the seller notes you could drive this truck in its current patina’d state if a nut-and-bolt restoration is out of the question. The flathead V8 / manual transmission is an ideal combo, and it’s listed here on eBay with bidding over $1K and no reserve.

The Ford was found as part of an estate liquidation in Manitoba, where it had been parked since the early 2000s. Despite being stationary, rust did not ravage the body or floors. The flatbed is where the most actual rot exists, as the seller notes some of the wood boards are rotted through. That’s a relatively easy fix compared to the prospect of cab rot, of which the seller claims there is none.

The seller has performed some basic upkeep, including new hubcaps and a freshly reupholstered bench seat. He also installed a new cap, rotor, plugs, wires, and fuel pump. The seller further notes that while it runs great and can drive, more work will be needed before it can reliably run down the road. He specifically mentions that the brakes need some attention, and that the rotted tires should be replaced.

Fairly minor quibbles in the grand scheme of things, particularly when you consider how solid the Ford is underneath and in common problem areas like the floors, cab corners, and doors. The patina’d paint may not be everyone’s top choice, but with a no reserve listing and low opening bid, there could be enough money left in the kitty to give this clean F3 the paint job of your choice. Would you preserve it as-is or restore it back to OEM+ condition?

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Comments

  1. Howard A Member

    Hooray!! It appears the bottom has begun to fall out, and regular schmoes like me, can buy these once again. 2 bids and only TEN BUCKS over a grand! So what, the 1st bid was a grand, and the 2nd $10 bucks? Doesn’t sound like a lot of interest to me. As the bottom falls out, less and less people are A), going to restomod these trucks, there’s plenty already, and B), nobody wants a rattly old Ford truck that doesn’t even have a box( although, the back does look nice here) with worn steering and iffy brakes and the 6 volt won’t power up their phones, probably the biggest deal breaker of them all. This is a great find for us older folks, finally, wouldn’t take much, and you’d have a neat old Ford pickup that you have no intention of going faster than 50mph with and hopefully, for the little guys, a view of things to come.

    Like 16
    • Zack

      I agree 100% with you Howard A with a little fluff up it would be a very nice and reliable truck to drive on the weekends and maybe a parts hauler to. These trucks are very reliable because they are so simple and there are no electronics to get in the way. But it would be nice if you could find a box for it that was around the same color. Even though I think it would is fine without it.

      Like 6
      • BR

        Cellphones only require 5.5 volts, Howard. Helloooooooooo!

        Like 1
    • GaryEvans

      RE: “…and the 6 volt won’t power up their phones…” In 2013 my son and I drove my 6 volt 1951 Pontiac from Seattle to Dallas using a common cigarette lighter adapter for the charging cord and had no problem charging our iPhones and simultaneously powering a GPS. I think only 5 V (or less?) are required for most electronics. Having said this, a 12 volt conversion is likely before another long road trip, after having trouble with the mechanical fuel pump and then having to find a 6 volt electric fuel pump in Montana and having generator problems in New Mexico (https://fugutabetai.com/?postid=520 )

      Like 1
    • Howard A Member

      Who cares what a cell phone takes to charge, you missed my point. Fact is, this may not even have a “port”, I still call them cigarette lighters, then what? Positive ground, what the heck is that? Zap,,poof,,,there goes the phone after all,,,

      Like 4
      • Zack

        Howard A I have said it before and I will say it again you said it all. From what br said that only leaves .5 volts left.

  2. NotSure

    What @Howard A said…

    Like 3
  3. ccrvtt

    Awesome!

    Like 1
  4. geomechs geomechs Member

    The memories keep coming back. When I was a kid these were thicker than flies on a dead horse, especially the ’48 to ’50 models. Very few flatbeds; mostly pickup bodies with hoists, and that hole cut in the tailgate to let grain out (destroyed a lot of tailgates). I’d actually prefer a pickup box to the flatbed, and on this one, finding a box might be a challenge because most of these were well used. There are still some around that might be willing to give up the box. Truck is in good shape otherwise. I think the floor in my ’47 was in worse shape than this one (they get rusted out because of moisture getting between the mat and the floor). Other than that, the cab looks like some minor dent repairs and a nice single stage repaint. A lot of blue trucks in that era although I think the forest green was still dominant. I’m wondering if the engine is the original; According to my sources red was the correct engine color for the 8BA in the trucks. I was told (recently) that Canadian truck engines were a shade of green. Of course, after 67 years, it could’ve been repainted during an overhaul so who knows?

    Like 4
  5. ICEMAN from Winnipeg

    “Despite hailing from Canada”?

    Like 3
    • BR

      Hailing from Canada it would be a Mercury.

      • geomechs geomechs Member

        I believe you’re quite wrong there, BR. There were lots of Ford trucks made in Canada. They were easily identified from ’48 to ’50 in that the model designations were based on their GVW. For example, a pickup was an F-47, which stood for 4700 lb. GVW. In 1951 the model numbers were the same on both sides of the border. Of course, the Mercury trucks were obviously different…

        Like 2
      • BR
      • geomechs geomechs Member

        I’m familiar with the article in Wikipedia. Like it says, Mercury trucks were sold through Mercury franchises. Ford trucks still went through the Ford franchises. Being raised on the border west of Sweetgrass, MT, I saw a lot of trucks migrating both ways. Cross-border farming operations, marriages and the fact that the closest dealers were in Canada, brought that somewhat unique situation about. I’ve told the story before of seeing a (’48-’50) M-47, an F-47 and an F-1 all parked at the curb in Shelby, and all (3) had Montana plates.

        Like 1
    • Howard A Member

      Sounds like fightin’ words, eh?

      Like 1
  6. Gaspumpchas

    Agreed, Guys, hearing that flatmotor purr and double clutching thru the gears makes this ol grey hair smile, Would also Like to see box go back on there, might be tough to find a decent one as it looks like the longer wheelbase. An affordable price would be the icing on the cake. Freshen er up or as geomechs said, a nice singlestage paint job, you can still get acrylic enamel LOL!! Good luck to the new owner.
    Cheers
    GPC

    Like 3
  7. PatrickM

    Bidding at $1,035.00. Neat old truck. I have a soft spot for these but, sadly, no room at the inn. If I did and it were a little closer to home, there would be a strong chance…. And I would drive as-is for now, repair and restore as time and wallet permitted. A new paint job would come along as soon as possible. Black or navy blue.

    Like 2
  8. Dave

    Put a gas cap on it!!

    Like 2
  9. Beau Stepford

    If you look closely the VIN tag is missing on the center of the firewall. You can see the outline in the paint where it once was. I wonder what kind of title he has for the truck and if it matches the VIN stamped on the frame. Shady.

    Like 1

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