One Tough Customer: 1962 Willys Jeep Station Wagon

Rodney McDonaldBy Rodney McDonald

One of the most far-sighted business decisions ever made was the trademarking of the JEEP name by Willys-Overland in 1943. Soldiers returning from the Second World War equated the Jeep brand with a tough, go-anywhere vehicle and those who needed off-road capabilities probably thought of Jeep first. An example of an uncommon Jeep model is this 1962 Willys Jeep Station Wagon for sale on Craigslist in Waterboro, Maine for $2,600. Thanks, AMXBrian for the tip!

Older four wheel drive vehicle values have been on an upward trajectory for the last several years, mirroring the new car market’s change in taste from sedans to truck and utility vehicles. And it’s those high values that make this unusual wagon seem like a pretty good buy- unless there are some serious corrosion issues.

The seller states that it’s “all there,” and that it needs “motor and body work.” We don’t have any photos of the chassis but if it spent its life in the upper northeast US a potential buyer needs to look closely. There aren’t any pictures of the engine and the seller says that it is the flathead Continental Hurricane six-cylinder. An overhead valve six-cylinder was made standard later in the 1962 model year.

The exterior photos show some rust perforation around the wheel arches on the driver’s side and the usual surface rust associated with a truck of its age.  More concerning, there are no pictures provided of the passenger side, so its condition is open to question. The chrome trim spears that are visible look reasonably bright as do the bumpers- a good thing since re-chroming is not a cheap undertaking.

Inside we can see one pretty crusty seat behind the steering wheel and the rest of the wagon is empty. It looks like the passenger door may be held closed by a bungee cord and there are various pieces in the back, including what looks like the engine’s head.  Of course, the obligatory gun rack is present. It’s probably a good thing that it’s 1,500 miles away from where I am on the Gulf Coast, because I’d be drawn to it like a moth to a flame. In my opinion, it deserves restoration mainly due to its scarcity. What do you think?

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Comments

  1. leiniedude Member

    Gone! Here is a photo of my 1960. A ton of support for these at http://www.oldwillysforum.com/forum/forum.php

    15
    • Howard A Member

      NICE!!! I knew we’d hear from you on this. Was that picture taken last week in the Badger?? 🙂 ( BTW, I do miss the UP, Mike)

      4
      • leiniedude Member

        LOL Howard! Yup, taken last week and 90 today. Take care, Mike.

        2
    • On and On

      Cool ride Mike, I’ll need a ride. I had a 1963 Willys CJ5 back in Chicago and used to make money plowing driveways. Loved the levers on the floor. Don’t miss getting out to engage the hubs or laying in the snow replacing plow mounting bolts I used to shear off till my dad got me a set of grade 8s.

      3
    • Dan B.

      x2 for OldWillysForum.com. Good luck to the seller.

      2
  2. Mountainwoodie

    Gotta love a jeep door held shut with a bungee cord. Those Nor’easters are nothing if not practical

    3
  3. Howard A Member

    At first, I thought this may be a “Maverick” Special. except, I read, the Maverick was pulled in 1960, even though the show stayed on until 1962. Jeep sponsored the show, and had a Maverick Special with this paint trim, but was a 2 wheel drive, had carpeting and 4 cylinder, column shift only.
    My 1st FFW( Flat-Fendered Willys) was a 1950 wagon with a SBC in it. It was like riding in a metal coffee can with 5 marbles in it. Rattled, shook, noisy, rode rough, steered terribly, lousy brakes then I found a ’51 pickup and put the V8 in it, with much better results. We’ve come a long ways in SUV’s, just so the future buyer knows, this is about as crude as it gets. Love ’em, I’d sure like another.

    5
  4. ccrvtt

    I was probably 16, visiting a friend at his family’s cottage somewhere in Michigan. His uncle had one of these in dark green and used it to take kids on rides through the two-tracks in the surrounding forests.

    To this day I remember that it rattled, shook, was noisy, & rode rough. What a great car!

    3
  5. Dick Johnson

    THAT IS NOT A JEEP. I’VE SEEN JEEPS! AND THAT IS NOT A JEEP!

    A JEEP is one of those things that people who pay 40,000++ USD for, and then when it’s 105 degrees F., pull all four doors off, pull back the roof, and cruise around with their legs hanging out of the cabin. And, just to make sure you know it’s an original JEEP, they put WILLYS stickers all over it.

    The natives of the Rocky Mountains really take a dim view of these ‘ssssittty folk’ aberations. After all, it is much easier to pose, than to really lead the life. The Ozarks are being crawled all over by the real JEEP owners. This wagon is a prime example. Spent more than a few hours camping with folks who still own their serious off road campers.

    4
  6. Dick Johnson

    Man, I really need to go to Curmudgeon Management classes. I think I’ll paint “WILLIE’S JEEP” on our RATTLEY ROD. Mebbe I’ll mellow out a bit. ‘Cept I don’t smoke.

    1
    • Rex Kahrs

      Funny post Dick. Near my local Home Depot, there is a “half” speedbump, which extends over just half of the lane leading out of the Depot parking lot.

      I can’t tell you how many times I’ve seen posers in Jeeps and monster pickups go around that little speed bump.

      3
      • Dick Johnson

        Awwwwww riiiight! Jes’ like my FORMER doctor; he had a Hummer H-1, but didn’t make house calls. Too many snow drifts out here in the sticks I guess.

  7. exartist

    Posting is gone from CL. I was just about to hop on the phone to my brother who lives a few towns over and have him take a look. if the rust wasn’t too bad I expect it would be in his driveway by this time tomorrow.

    1
  8. Stillrunners

    Yep does have the chrome trim you don’t see often….

  9. Wrong Way

    How could anyone not love it? This is a real Jeep! I say fully restore it and keep it!

    2
  10. Bob C.

    The optional OHV engine mentioned above was actually the OHC Tornado straight six in its first year. It was also used in the Wagoneer and Gladiator pickup until 1965, but was trouble prone.

    • Dan B.

      Yup, the 230 OHC Tornado came out in May 1962 in the Willys trucks and wagons. I love the one in my 1964 Willys Wagon: https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=HMNr7oGxAAQ

      They are great engines, if you check the oil. The later ones had some slight mods which also improved them.

  11. Lee

    My dad had a ’62, previous owner put a 283 in it (should have been a 289/302:)
    I learned how to drive a stick with this, and used it, to get my first driver’s license. Good memories of my dad.

  12. Lee Y

    My dad had a ’62, previous owner put a 283 in it (instead of a 289/302 🙂
    I learned to drive a clutch in this, and drove it to get my first driver’s license.
    Good memory of dad….

  13. Lee Yusten

    My dad had a ’62, previous owner put a 283 in it (instead of a 289/302 🙂
    Learned to drive a clutch with this, and drove it to get my driver’s license.
    Good memory of dad…..

  14. Kirsten

    We went to see this Willys. No floor, rockers are gone. Engine is locked. Cracked window. Lots of rust/holes in panels. Not worth $2600. It’s a beauty. But you have to be a Willys nut with a lot of free time and $ to put into this project.

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