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Parked Since 1980! 1972 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser

Borrowing a glamorous cue from the iconic Greyhound Scenicruiser, Oldsmobile made all the neighbors jealous with its glass roof-paneled Vista Cruiser wagons from 1964 to 1977. This shiny blue and white 1972 Oldsmobile Vista Cruiser in Hudson, New Hampshire came from Texas, according to the seller, where it last saw registration in 1980! A host of replacement parts has the classic long-roof running and driving “really well,” according to the listing here on eBay. An apparently never-restored interior and engine compartment present opportunities that some buyers will skip. From a pool of over 60 watchers, none have clicked Buy It Now for $18,500, though you might get lucky with the Make Offer button.

Bench seating offers seat belts for six in two rows, a rare feat these days. Hopefully that wood or plastic steering wheel cover can be replaced with something more original. Air conditioning marks one key upgrade on this Olds, blowing “ice cold” according to the seller.

Anything not swallowed whole by the cavernous cargo bay could be lashed to the top for added utility. This 1972 model marked the last year that the Vista Cruiser enjoyed an extra five inches of wheelbase over the Cutlass sedan models on which it was based. Notice how the generous side of the combined brake and taillight module echos the upswept bumper end. Suburban neighbors of lesser means ordered a Cutlass Cruiser without the amazing glass roof panels, then hung their heads in shame every time you parked next door.

Back when at least four GM divisions had distinct 350 cid (5.7L) V8 engines, the Olds “Rocket” 350 and stablemates of the same size powered most of the OldsmoBuicks and other mid-sized GMs of the day as well as full-sized cars and trucks. This body style offered an optional 455 cid (7.5L) V8 from 1970 through 1972, according to Wikipedia, but this 350 should pack ample grunt and reasonable economy for a classic of this size and age.

Hello in there! (echo… echo…) Though only a mid-sized wagon in its day, the Vista Cruiser boasts a larger cargo floor than most modern pickup trucks, except with the bonus of trading loading space for passenger space as easily as folding a seat up. The plastic finishes have seen better days, but might come around with some cosmetic TLC. Where does the Vista Cruiser rank on your list of awesome wagons?

Comments

  1. Avatar photo PaulG

    Nice, but the seller should finish what they started for a 18.5 ask.
    The first 3 pictures (minus the steering wheel) made it seem priced right.
    Would be a nice cruiser.

    Like 8
  2. Avatar photo L.B.

    1964 to 1972 Olds Vista Cruiser’s, if you restore these cars without putting on the wood grain vinyl, you loose half the Value as all these cars came Factory with the lower wood grain according to Hagerty He will not get what he’s asking for, also the wheels should be steel rims with hub caps, this is where people go wrong, they don’t know the cars they are restoring, these cars restoration should be factory including factory glass to get the high money. I am a Vista Cruiser man, 3-1971’s I’ve own, the 3rd I’m still driving as my daily driver. I would offer him $ 5000.00 for the car, the interior is going to take a lot of work, especially the Head Liner. Steering wheel is not factory. He doesn’t list any options, it does not have the Optional 3rd seat. 6 Passenger car.

    Like 8
  3. Avatar photo L.B.

    1964 to 1972 Olds Vista Cruiser’s, if you restore these cars without putting on the wood grain vinyl, you loose half the Value as all these cars came Factory with the lower wood grain according to Hagerty He will not get what he’s asking for, also the wheels should be steel rims with hub caps, this is where people go wrong, they don’t know the cars they are restoring, these cars restoration should be factory including factory glass to get the high money. I am a Vista Cruiser man, 3-1971’s I’ve own, the 3rd I’m still driving as my daily driver. I would offer him $ 5000.00 for the car, the interior is going to take a lot of work, especially the Head Liner. Steering wheel is not factory. He doesn’t list any options, it does not have the Optional 3rd seat. 6 Passenger car. Car never came with O.A.I. (Outside Air Induction) Hood it did come with Factory A/C & Power Front Disk Brakes 1968-1972

    Like 2
    • Avatar photo James Quinn
    • Avatar photo Bryan Hayden

      Most Vista Cruisers had the plain hood but there’s a Hurst/Olds version that did come with the 442 style hood and a spoiler on the back. Plus other lengthy options that Hurst had to offer then. Not very many were built like that but they are there. This car reflects those certain options and even though it’s not truly accurate, it is very cool the way it is. Yeah it’s true that the originality of vehicle can be set for more money, but money isn’t everything either. As a dedicated owner of any vehicle that I’ve owned, I rather print my persona on it than something that looks like any other car of its kind on the road. I do love these cars cuz of their size and it has it’s own personality. I rather drive it than it becoming a trailer queen of some sort.

      Like 3
  4. Avatar photo Richard McBride

    My favorite wagon…I agree w/LB too much for what you are getting. 3500.00

    Like 4
  5. Avatar photo Kent

    I grew up during the period when these cars were new. They did not all have the wood grain paneling on the side and back. Hagerty is incorrect about that. $18,500 might be a bit high, however with the ridiculous prices I’m seeing these days, who knows for sure. It’s going to cost a bit to fix the interior and cleanup the engine bay, but this could be an interesting car when completed and there aren’t that many left. The factory style fiberglass dual scooped hood gives it a bit of the “In Your Face” 442 look. Personally I like it, would look for the factory style Ralley Steering Wheel for it instead of the aftermarket Grant wood rim Steering wheel. That is real walnut wood by the way.

    Like 7
  6. Avatar photo Hank

    Everybody with a restorable old car suddenly thinks it’s worth a bundle.
    If it’s been sitting for 43 years (And I’ve Said This Before)
    Seals in the Shocks are shot, all the rubber in the brake and fuel lines are shot, chances are Wheel Cylinders and calipers (if so equipped) are pitted garbage now. And that’s just the beginning. How’s the wiring holding up? I’ve owned Corvairs that ran that were 40 years old, and you could snap the wires in the engine harness just by bending them.

    The Interior is going to be pricey. There’s a LOT of it. It’s NOT a car you can sell for 85 K, though you’ll end up with that much in the thing.

    5K is MORE than a reasonable offer. If he doesn’t want that, he may find himself pushing it back in the garage for another 44.

    Like 4
  7. Avatar photo James Quinn

    Test

    Like 1
  8. Avatar photo Michael Yount

    The Hurst Olds production is well documented by various clubs and Hurst Olds enthusiasts. They never produced any wagons under the “Hurst Olds” moniker — although quite a few “clones” were produced by enthusiastic Olds/wagon fans. This wagon is a plain-Jane Vista Cruiser wagon with a 442 style hood on it. And as mentioned above by Mr. Quinn above, TONS of Vista Cruisers were produced without the vinyl “wood grain”. My father ordered a new 1965 model — black exterior (no wood grain), red interior, front bench seat, 1/3-2/3 rear bench seat, and forward facing 3rd seat, 4 speed manual transmission, 330/4bbl engine. With duals and glass packs and the 4 speed, it was an absolute blast to drive as a teenager. As the decades have passed, I’ve come to realize just how rare that engine/transmission option probably was in the ’65 Cruiser. I’m sure it went to the junkyard long, long ago.

    Like 3
  9. Avatar photo Davey Boy

    I personally like the add-ons. The rally wheels and the 442 style hood. Really don’t bother me either way about the steering wheel. Price is a little high but someone is going to pay. That’s why people price them like they do. If people wouldn’t pay so much then other people wouldn’t ask so much.

    Like 2
  10. Avatar photo Alan Jones

    Alan Jones @alanshomeservices@gmail.com I will trade him My 1971 Convertible !

    Like 0
  11. Avatar photo George

    The last year for the true Vista Cruiser roof glass was 1972.

    Like 0
  12. Avatar photo Rustomodrob

    $18,500 is a bit much. Since the introduction of the “interWeb” 30 years ago prices have been most ridiculous on what one believes the car should be worth. Now some are worthy of the prices they fetch due to their rarity, most are driven up from the memories of one’s past, or they just …want it if the $$ is no object. In the end fixing it up in hopes of cashing in on a good pay day…well..it’s just money. I say if the price was more realistic…Just dust her off, fix a few things…and drive her. What’s the point of doing a total restoration besides the big $$ if on return. She’d get more attention on the road than sitting in a garage all fancied up. We are not guaranteed our next breath…all we currently possess now will become someone else’s later…or thrown out. But that’s just me lol. Hope everyone has a great day…and rescue those ole cars..like Rod Roddy said
    “If…the price is right”!

    Like 5
  13. Avatar photo Car Nut Tacoma

    Nice looking car. Assuming it still runs and drives, I’d be willing to pay between $1k and $10k for the car. However nice it may be, nothing is worth $18k.

    Like 2

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