Rare Italian Grand Tourer: 1967 Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2

Mention the name Lamborghini and most enthusiasts will think of potent mid-engined supercars like the Countach, the Diablo, or the Aventador. Less readily recognized, although no less desirable, are their genuine Grand Tourers like this 1967 400 GT 2+2. Designed to devour enormous distances in effortless comfort, only 224 examples emerged from the factory between 1966 and 1968. Some of the history of this classic has become lost, but the owner has returned it to its former glory, ready for it to find a new home. Currently located in Monte Carlo, Monaco, the owner has listed the 400 GT for sale here at RM Sotheby’s Auctions. The seller offers a guide price of €300,000 – €350,000, and with the current exchange rate, that translates to a range of $315,000 – $370,000. I have to say a big thank you to Barn Finder PRA4SNW for spotting this stunning classic for us.

The seller indicates that this Lamborghini landed on North American soil in December of 1967 and is one of the last 400 GTs to roll out of the factory. Ordered by the original owner wearing a shade called Grigio Argento, little is known of this classic’s early history. It found its way to foreign shores at some point, with its current owner chancing across the Lambo in the Netherlands in 2015. Photographic evidence confirms that the car had been in that location since at least 2007 and that a previous owner performed a color change to Brown. Once in their possession, the current owner returned it to its former glory, and it presents beautifully. The paint has a rich depth of color and shine, with no significant flaws or defects. The panels are equally impressive, while there are no issues with the trim or glass. For me, those gorgeous wire wheels are the highlight of this exterior. They are deeply dished for a wheel of this type and add a sense of purpose to the GT’s appearance.

Much of the engineering for the 400 GT was overseen by Gian Paolo Dallara. If that name sounds familiar, Dallara has strong links with motorsport. In 1997, his company entered IndyCar competition with its own chassis and is currently the control chassis supplier. Dallara was considered a whiz kid in the 1960s, being aged in his mid-20s when handed the 400 GT project. After reworking the chassis and drivetrain from a concept show car, he arrived at the final production specifications for the GT 2+2. The engine bay houses a 3,929cc V12 work of art producing 360hp. That power finds its way to the rear wheels via a five-speed manual transmission, and with a weight of 3,042lbs, that combination makes this Lamborghini a genuinely fast car. Capable of covering the ¼ mile in 14.1 seconds, this Grand Tourer should run out of breath at around 162mph. Early versions of the 400 GT rolled out of the factory equipped with a ZF transmission, but these proved to be cumbersome and not user-friendly. Lamborghini took matters into their own hands by developing and producing a replacement unit in-house, and this car features one of those transmissions. The seller indicates that the GT runs and drives perfectly, making it ready for the next owner’s motoring pleasure.

The current owner seemed intent on preserving this Lamborghini, and a lack of significant interior issues saw them retain the interior trim and upholstery untouched. Most of the upholstered surfaces wear lather in a shade called Tobacco, and apart from a few insignificant marks, they present well for a handbuilt classic of this age. That tidy survivor theme continues with the dash and carpet, making this car a driver-grade vehicle ready for the buyer’s enjoyment. I know I’m not alone in feeling that a classic sports car interior should house a good collection of gauges, a row of toggle switches on the dash, and a wood-rimmed wheel. This Lamborghini carries those features, and apart from some minor wear on the wheel rim, they appear in good condition.

With such a low production total, it isn’t every day that you are likely to see a Lamborghini 400 GT 2+2. In a decade, this is only our second at Barn Finds, and both have been stunning classics with the ability to send purists weak at the knees. Because of their rarity, they don’t often come onto the market, with one setting a sales record of $627,000 in 2018. Given its overall condition, I wouldn’t be surprised to see our feature car exceed the auctioneer’s upper estimate. That places it well beyond my reach, but I guess I can watch the auction and dream. There’s nothing wrong with doing that.

Comments

  1. Rixx56 Member

    Striking at any angle!

    Like 18
  2. Mikefromthehammer

    She is a thing of beauty. Venus is her name.

    One question though. Are the window cranks missing, or does Venus have power windows?

    Like 4
    • Jack

      Venus has power windows. They are the two black rocker switches to the right and left of the ignition key

      Like 11
      • Mikefromthehammer

        Thanks Jack!

        Like 3
  3. Rob

    Bellissima!

    Like 8
  4. T S

    Love it. But like a lot of Euro cars it has a face. And this face says cross-eyed and bucktoothed. But that wouldn’t stop me from driving it (if I could afford it). Vintage beauty though!

    Like 2
    • Winesmith

      TS, I had a girlfriend like that once……

      Like 1
  5. DeeBee

    Wow! drooled all over my keyboard! I love older lamborghinis! Far as I’m concerned, Countach and beyond, just origami exercises with no true purpose in life!

    Like 10
    • 370zpp 370zpp Member

      “just origami exercises with no true purpose in life!”?

      I thought that was what filing income taxes was.

      Like 11
    • Martin Horrocks

      Agree 100%. After the Espada and Islero, Lambo went silly. But boy, did their small band of ultra-talented youngsters hit the ground running!

      Like 4
  6. jwaltb

    Cool car. Why is it on Barn Finds? Want to become the next BAT?

  7. GitterDunn

    What is that bulky black thing with 2 chrome knobs on top, attached to the passenger’s side of the dashboard? An air-conditioning unit?

    Like 2
    • Mikefromthehammer

      At first glance I would have said a glove box, but then I saw a closeup view picture and it had a grill facing upwards. That makes me think you are correct about the AC.

      Like 3
      • GitterDunn

        I would have considered a trunk mounted unit before mounting that clunky-looking thing on the dashboard. It wouldn’t have left much space for luggage, but there’s always that otherwise-useless “back seat”. I’d rather do without the A/C altogether than have that thing spoiling the looks of the interior!

        Like 3
      • Bill McCoskey Bill McCoskey Member

        Yes, it’s a Boretti A/C unit, and almost all Lambo cars in the 60s imported into the USA had one. I saw a 400GT 2+2 in the Washington DC area back in the 1980s, and it had 2 differences in the A/C system: First the A/C unit was “hidden” with an attached, leather covered panel. Second, the front knob & grill assembly was turned 90 degrees to send the cold air out across the cabin area, not up into the headliner as on this car. I suspect this A/C unit might be a replacement unit, because it’s possible the original A/C may have been removed once the car was imported back into Europe.

        Like 1
      • Bill McCoskey Bill McCoskey Member

        Yes, it’s a Boretti A/C unit, and almost all Lambo cars in the 60s imported into the USA had one. I saw a 400GT 2+2 in the Washington DC area back in the 1980s, and it had 2 differences in the A/C system: First the A/C unit was “hidden” with an attached, leather covered panel. Second, the front knob & grill assembly was turned 90 degrees to send the cold air out across the cabin area, not up into the headliner as on this car. I suspect this A/C unit might be a replacement unit, because it’s possible the original A/C may have been removed once the car was imported back into Europe.

        Like 1
  8. Edward t Thron

    I was offered one of these back in the mid 80’s for 4000.00 . It had languished at an oceanfront vacation home for 15 – 20 years . The corrosion and rust scared me off . It was gold with the wire wheels , but so rusty . I don’t recall the interior color but I recall the strong smell of mice . Looking back on it it was probably saveable , especially given current values .

    Like 7
  9. Howie

    Sweet ride, that barn must have been mighty clean!!

    Like 1
  10. aboyandhisdog aboyandhisdog Member

    That rear roof and quarter windows looks a lot like a 911. Until you get down to the tail fins anyway. Cool car. As a GT car though, you have to wonder if those long drives on the highway ‘eating up the miles’ would be trouble-free. Did anybody EVER drive cars like this long distances?

    Like 1
  11. Tompdx Member

    Dead sexy!

    Totally agree about ‘you 60s and early ‘70s Lambos – all just gorgeous. They lost their way after that.

    Like 4
  12. Jimbosidecar

    I was at the Monterey Historics a number of years ago, the Miura was the featured car and Tonigno Lamborghini was a featured speaker. The moderator asked him about the meeting between his grandfather, Feruccio and Enzo Ferrari. It was hilarious. You can find it on line either on Youtube or just do an online search.

    Like 3
  13. Carmanic Carmanic Member

    A guy I knew from the Golden Gate Lotus Club has one of these he bought in the early 70’s because it was less expensive than the contemporary Ferrari model (I forget which). I do recall him saying he paid $7k for it as a clean driver, and when I knew him in the early 90’s he was still driving it to work on a regular basis.

    Like 6
  14. douglas hunt

    always liked the look of these, the least favorite being those headlights, but dang, the rest of the car is just plain gorgeous and I can imagine cruising around in that thing for sure.

    Like 1
  15. Wayne from Oz

    Looks good until you get to the C pillar then it all goes wrong.

  16. MICHAEL LLOYD GREGORY Member

    One of our neighbors had a red one when I was in high school. He always backed it into the garage. I would ride my bike past their house every day in hopes of seeing those headlights visible inside the open garage door. He let us come up and look at it once. I only saw him driving it maybe two times. What a treasure.

    Like 1

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