Sitting Since The 70s: 1954 Nash Metropolitan

It really helps your case when selling a car to provide extensive photos of the vehicle being offered. Here is an example of less certainly not being more. A 1954 Nash Metropolitan being auctioned here on eBay in Racine, Wisconsin with a current bid of $1,370.00 with an unmet reserve.

The only photo provided by the seller is at the top of this post and while it’s not bad, we would sure like more to help make a bidding decision. We see the Met in a storage building and when the image is expanded, we can see that it looks fairly nice. The paint isn’t perfect and the chrome could use a polishing. The car may be on wide whites since we can juuuust see a tire peeking out from the front fender.

There are boxes of parts in view and the one at the left of the image has an SU carburetor, a water pipe and what might be some fuel plumbing for a twin carburetor setup. The cardboard box on the floor has what looks like headlight buckets that may or may not be part of the car for sale.

The seller says that the car has been painted its current color from the silver which he states that paperwork with the car indicates that it was in the 1970s. He says that the seats have been recovered in black vinyl, but we can only guess at the quality of the work. Body-wise, the seller tells us that the floor pans will need replacement but we can’t be sure what other pieces could be affected. There is no key and no title, but then Alabama (where the car came from) did not issue titles in 1954.

I hope the seller gets the bid he’s looking for, but with the lack of detail or photos, he’s really not helping his cause. Even though the seller invites us to contact him with any questions, would you, Barn Finds reader, hit the bid button with just this information?

 

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Comments

  1. Dave Mika

    Aw, no.

    2
  2. RedBaran

    I would need two of these cars, one for each foot…

    7
  3. Ikey Heyman Member

    I realize people buy cars online all the time sight-unseen, but there’s not enough to go on here for me anyway. Seems like there’s always a lot of Metropolitans for sale, why not get one that’s already running or needs minimum work to get running?

    2
  4. Wd62vette

    From the single picture that’s posted this appears to be a 56 57 or a 58 Metropolitan the 54 and 55 were solid colors and never had the two tone Chrome molding down the sides. 54 and 55 had the hood scoop and the grill was totally different. Even with one picture you can tell it’s not a 54.

    4
  5. Bob C.

    Should have an Austin 1.2L four under the hood, churning out a whopping 40 hp (barely), and a three on the tree.

    3
    • That AMC guy

      Not much power to be sure, but should be good for over 30 mpg. Take that, gas guzzling dinosaurs and trundling tanks!

      These also have an Austin 4-speed transmission, but 1st gear is blocked off. Nash wanted three-on-the-tree which they believed their customers would be the most familiar with. None of that danged furrin four-on-the-floor stuff.

      2
      • luke arnott

        Anyone ever driven a 4 speed column shift car?Great fun!

        3
  6. That AMC guy

    I used to have one of these. Looks pretty nice up top but the tinworm came standard on these cars from the factory. I used to have one. Nice for puttering about town but definitely not a freeway cruiser. If the floors are rotted you’ll want to check the unit structure carefully!

    These cars do have a dedicated following and mechanical parts (being bog-standard Austin for the most part) are still readily available.

    3
  7. GearHead Engineering

    They have added several new photos. The first car I ever restored was a ’56 Met convertible. It’s been a while but I still have fond memories. Some things about this one:

    As Wd62vette noted, it is NOT a ’54. The chassis number, hood, side trim, and grille all indicate a ’56 or later car. No side vent windows so it’s no later than a ’58.

    It looks pretty solid. There are now pics of the underside. Battery box is rotted out but that’s normal and pretty easy to fix.

    The rockers (aka sills) look good. You can see the vertical lines where the front and rear fenders overlap the sills. Those are usually filled with bondo so I think that’s a good sign on this one.

    I would redo the seats and door panels back to stock. The original houndstooth seats just work better than black vinyl for me.

    Odd paint code: just P914 on the trim tag, which is white if I remember right. Usually these had two colors. The red under hood looks original so it was probably a red and white car.

    The paint scheme is wrong on the front end. It should be white around the grille, up to the crease on the front of the hood.

    These are fun cars and this one could be a good deal. These rust horribly so it’s best to start with a solid one as this one appears to be. I wouldn’t mind having another one. People love them, and they get great gas mileage. Just be prepared for a very wide turning radius and MASSIVE understeer.

    – John

    6
  8. Diane M Lynch

    The first car I remember is a red and white Metro. My father had several of them and they are such a fond memory. I love them so much I have one tattooed on my arm. Sadly that is the closest I will ever get to owning one…

    5
  9. KawiVulc

    Don’t know if it’s the goofy, cartoonish styling or the two-tone paint they always seem to sport but these little guys appeal to me. Hope this one finds a good home. The eBay posting, though… I’ll just say that I made my first sales on eBay before the capability to post pics of your item was even implemented and with some sellers said capability is pretty much wasted.

    2
  10. Howard A Member

    I agree, not a ’54. ’54 would have a different grille and a Hudson badge. ’56 was the 1st year for the AMC Met.

    1
  11. Michael

    VIN Tag shows Model # 562. This represents a 1956 Hardtop, verses 561 for the convertible. This makes much more sense given the smooth hood, grill surround, and painful-to-get-right side trim for standard two-tone beginning with ’56. This also confirms the green Austin 1500 OHV engine. Paint #914 represents Frost White; no mention of Canyon Red #904. I think the seller in Wisconsin is CYA by mentioning previous owner was a car salesman in Alabama.

    2
  12. Boatman Member

    My ’61 “clown car” in high school. Drove all week on $3 worth of gas (1976)

    5
  13. Mark Evans

    FYI Check door posts for sag i.e. rot. Terminal to my 61 after much coastal driving in B.C. It’s been 25 years since but it would be a great idea to relocate the master cylinder from under the floor to the engine compartment. Did a rebuild kit after every year (5) of ownership in Ontario.

    1
  14. CaCarDude

    For Luke on the 4 spd column shift car a big yes, I can recall the only car I drove back in the mid 60’s while working my fathers public parking lot was a 4 on the tree Borgward, an odd old 4dr buggy, and not a car I would care to own.
    On this Metro I have to say I have a soft spot for these and am in the market for a nice rust free driver,… not for myself but my wife who absolutely loves these little cars. She has been asking me lately to find her a yellow white hardtop model. I will continue the search…

    1
    • luke arnott

      CaCarDude – can’t remember the last time I saw a Borgward on the road!The only car I drove with a 4 speed column change was a 1961 Hillman Minx.The Ford Mk 3 Zephyrs & Zodiacs had this arrangement as well.

      1
  15. Robert Rossi

    This Met is either a ’56 or’57. It has a three piece back window and no vent windows. One piece rear glass came out in 1958 and continued through the end of the run, 1961. Outside trunks and vent windows came out in 1959. I’ve owned these cars since 1979.

    4
  16. leiniedude Member

    Ended: Oct 24, 2018 , 12:52PM
    Winning bid:US $2,085.00
    [ 74 bids ]

  17. Tony T

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