Stored For 10 Years In LA: 1967 Ford Mustang

a1

Sorry about the less than ideal pictures with this listing, but they are all we have to work with. However, this one might be worth pursuing if you want a second-series Mustang! It’s located in Los Angeles, California and is up for sale here on eBay with a fairly high buy-it-now of $6,000, but lower offers are invited.

a2

The finned inserts are a distinctive feature only fitted to 1967 Mustangs. I can tell you from personal experience that when you are 14 and misjudge the exit from the garage in your mom’s ’67, they don’t survive running into the garage side wall very well. What I don’t see here is rust! Door fit looks pretty good too, even though we don’t know what will happen once it’s unlatched.

a6

I’m hoping that’s a California blue plate that the seller has partially screened out. The car was made in the San Jose plant according to this VIN decoder, which also identified it as a 289 V8 2-barrel car. Perhaps it’s been in California its whole life? I do wish the beautiful ’67 filler cap was in place. Bumper fit is nice as well.

collage

The interior doesn’t look too bad, although obviously the seats need attention. I wonder which 8-track tape is in the dashboard player? Obviously, anything you need to restore this car is available from a number of specialists. The black seems an odd match to the shade of blue exterior; maybe it’s a repaint?

a3

While the under hood area looks a mess, at least it looks relatively stock as well. It’s showing 23,266 miles but I’m sure that’s at least 123,266. It does look like a very solid project to start from, though. My mom owned two 1967 notchbacks while I was growing up, and I have fond memories of both of them (although they are tempered somewhat by hitting the garage with the second one–I still remember having to tell my Dad). Would you like to make some memories of your own with this project?

Like This? Get Our Daily Email

Comments

  1. JW

    Craigslist / Ebayers PLEASE take the time to pull the vehicle you are trying to sell out of your barn / garage / basement and take quality photos from all angles / underneath / interior / engine bay then make an effort to detail what we are looking at. With that done you MIGHT get close to your asking price and a quick sale. JMHO !!!

  2. krash

    nonsense !!….

    I love blurry, obstructed photos taken in a rush under poorly lit conditions by a trembling hand..

    ..nothing screams “I want a million lowball offers” like a bad photo and an extremely vague accompanying description…

    You’re absolutely right, JW !!

  3. TBall

    All I can say is WOW! $6 large for a run of the mill, needs full restoration ’67 Mustang coupe. Makes my ’68 Fastback for $1,100 look much better…

    • Wayne S.K.

      Beautiful car, T…

  4. Jason Houston

    That’s tall money for a hardtop and not a 2+2, and one that’s been dunked at Earl Scheib. It better be really nice after the bath.

  5. RH FACTOR

    It’s got a dual diaphragm distributor. So it is probably a later model 302, ’71 or ’72. Just saying.

  6. ydnar

    What I take away from sellers leaving the filthy neglected cars filthy, is that they did not care about the car while it was being neglected, why would they care to clean it now?

    Or it could just be another lazy flipper.

    • Jason Houston

      Guess what? You’re RIGHT on both counts.

      • ydnar

        Oops, I am going to ruin my bad reputation.

        PS I sold a nice “one of” Ca. Olympics license plate on ebay a few years ago for $125.00. I bet it’s worth a lot more now, due to inflation, etc.

        I believe the number was 00619

  7. Jason Houston

    That’s not far from what those plates cost initially! The costs and fees are prohibitively expensive, which is why you rarely see them.

    • ydnar

      I was told to get the official Olympics license plates took a “substantial” donation, 10K or so. These tags were not for the general public.

      • Jason Houston

        I believe that’s entirely possible. I never followed those ‘cutesy’ plates because they were too ridiculously expensive. However, I did run my 1991 Bill Of Rights plates on my 1991 Ranger 4X4 and got tons of questions. Back in 1967, the new governor of Calif. held a post-election party and each place setting had a black Calif. plate that had THANKS as the lic. #. Never have been able to catch up with one of them, however. Supposedly, there were 300 produced.

  8. Tirefriar

    Salvage title.

    • Jason Houston

      That’s an easy fix if you know how. No biggie…

  9. Healeydays

    If it was in my backyard, I would buy.

  10. Rex Kahrs Member

    My, how some people do like to hear themselves talk.

    • Jason Houston

      … especially when they have nothing to say.

      • Wayne S.K.

        Speaking of that Jason, did I ever mention the time that I… oh, never mind!

  11. piper62j

    You guys have said it all.. :)

  12. Bandag

    A friend of mine paid a lot of money for a 67 that needed a total restore. Just a plain coupe. It has sat about 50% done in his shop for 10 years now. He admits he probably already spent more on it than it will be worth.

  13. Jason Houston

    The car has early 1970’s plates on it, so it could have had substitute plates for its original “U” series black plates, or it could have been imported from The Rust Belt.

  14. Ty

    This car has been hit in the left front at some time and had a poor repair done. Left front inner fender and radiator support show lots of evidence of damage. Not a huge deal if it went above frame rail, much bigger deal if it took an impact on the rail.

  15. piper62j

    Ty.. you’ve got a good point there.. Also, look at the gap between the right fender and door.. It’s huge.. And, the right fender is overlapping the top cowl panel on the right side..
    This puppy has been hit hard and the nose is swung over to the left side..

    The seller conveniently takes pictures to hide the obvious damage to the front end.. The car needs a frame machine to square the body and rails up so all the sheetmetal fits correctly.

  16. Casey

    You don’t buy and restore one of these coupes to make money. You do it because the cost of entry is still cheap, every part is available, there are infinite combinations of drivetrain for whatever use, and their still common enough that there’s no guilt in cutting it up and turning it into whatever you want. Not to mention my favorite part: tearing into it, finding broken stuff, fixing it and learning new things.

    The fastbacks and coverts get all the love, but these coupes are more practical, cheaper by far, and just as iconic. That said I’d still love a fastback. :)

Leave A Comment

RULES: No profanity, politics, or personal attacks. Don't post your car for sale in the comments. Click here to get it featured on the homepage instead.

*

Notify me of new comments via email. Or subscribe without commenting.