Chevy 327 V8-Powered: 1973 Triumph Stag

Update 8/27/19 – After close to a year, this Stag has resurfaced here on eBay. This time it’s listed with a lower starting bid and a reserve. It has also moved to Archer, Florida so we can only assume it’s being sold by the new owner.

From 12/14/18 – When it was released, the Triumph Stag promised us the World. Unfortunately, for a great many owners, the only part of the World that they got to see was the bit at the side of the road where they sat waiting for a tow truck. The main culprit for the chronic unreliability was the engine. The owner of this Stag has found a solution to this problem, and you will find the Stag listed for sale here on eBay. It is located in Mims, Florida, and comes with a clear title.

Apart from the numerous issues with the engine, the Stag could be plagued with rust problems. This Stag appears to have avoided these. The body is solid and straight, but the paint has developed the odd, semi-gloss look which was common on the Stag. Looking at the car overall, including the shots that the owner has provided of the underside, indicates a nice, solid car that would look a picture after a repaint. The car also comes with both a soft-top and a hardtop.

There are some photos of the interior, but I haven’t used any, as they are really blurry, and it’s hard to tell anything from them. The owner says that the interior is in really good condition, except for some wear in the piping on the seat edge, which is a common problem. Of greater interest is the engine. The original 3.0l Triumph engine had so many faults that you could write a book about it. Cooling issues, warping cylinder heads, water pump failures, and timing chain failures are just the beginning for them. The owner of this Stag has ditched the Triumph engine in favor of a 327ci Chevrolet V8. The engine has been fitted with a 4-barrel carburetor and a high-rise intake. This causes issues with hood clearance, so modifications to the hood may be necessary. The owner does have an extra hood for this purpose. Alternatively, the owner also has the original 2-barrel carburetor and low-rise intake from this engine and will refit those if desired. This would mean that the hood now clears, but it will also reduce performance. Personally, I’d go with the 2-barrel, as I think that the performance would still be adequate.

From a styling perspective, the Triumph Stag is a fantastic looking car. That it was built by a company that was mired in quality control issues, that was simultaneously being ravaged by industrial disputes, probably sealed its fate. This particular Stag offers a potentially reliable answer to the problems that beset the original car. Good examples start in the market at around $10,000, and from there it isn’t unheard of for prices to go as high as $30,000. The owner of this particular Stag has set the opening bid at $7,500, and I wouldn’t be at all surprised if it sells for more than that.

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Comments

  1. Maestro1

    This owner solved the problem I had with mine with an otherwise excellent concept. I enjoyed the car a great deal, it’s a nice size, very smooth on traffic and on freeways, by the way well done post Adam. Find out what the Seller really wants for the car and if it’s not fantasyland, jump on it.

    7
  2. Wayne

    Low rise 4 barrel manifold (after market or stock Chevy would do the trick with a “drop over carb” air filter. Although, a very small hood bump may look kind of cool if done properly.
    I have wanted to do this swap also, but using a small block Ford and 5 speed.

    3
  3. Kevin Mitchell

    I own one of these cars with the original drive train. With the factory bugs worked out it is an amazing car to drive.

    1
    • ken tilly

      If they had used the Rover 3.5 V8 in the first place they wouldn’t have had any of the problems that the Triumph engine came up with.

      1
  4. SMS

    I have never seen one of these with a replacement V8, other than the rover, that had an air cleaner and stock hood closed.

    Maybe I’m wrong but I would want to see this puppy running. Have seen quite a few poorly done conversions.

    One of the best looking cars of the 70’s I think.

    2
  5. JimmyinTEXAS

    Adam suggested the use of the low rise two barrel would inhibit performance and I chuckled. Slap a 3.0 Twin Turbo with about 400 horses and leave the 327 in the garage till you can find a better home for it. No problems with hood fitment and plenty of power. Looks like a no reserve auction except the starting bid, may be a great project for someone. AC car.

  6. stillrunners

    Nice survivor….

  7. JimmyJ

    Cool looking car but I hate the way the window frames were exposed when top was down,same with lotus Elan. It ruins the look when top is down

    3
  8. Mike Layton

    I would use neither carburetors mentioned and opt for an EFI and engine management system . Doesn’t look like there’s too much of a market ( no bids ) . Someone ought make a note of the seller , a cash offer after closing may save you some $$$ .

    2
  9. Tom Justice

    There was an episode of “For the love of cars” a while back that showed redoing one of these. They addressed the overheating issue and did an end of the show auction after a short scene with a local Stag club. If there is any need for advice or parts, I bet a search of Stag clubs, especially in England, will get you anything you need.

    2
  10. Tricky

    Auction ended, unsold!!

    1
  11. John McMahan

    I had one of these when it was 3 months old, It had already blown the head gaskets once and when I hit 90+ one day, it blew them again.
    I sold it back to the dealer. So I was lucky.
    But having all kinds of cars like that including the 72 Ghibli at the time.
    I remember it drove fantastically and was extremely well balanced.
    It cornered excellent, brakes were great and I liked the factory roll bar that was solid as a rock and with me being 6’2″ it had plenty of leg room and headroom.
    A newer turbo engine would be awesome in it

    1
  12. CCFisher

    Is this type of swap common? A chassis that needs a roll hoop and t-bar to maintain rigidity wouldn’t be my first choice to swap in a strong V8.

    1
    • John

      Reason for the T-bar roll bar was that at the time it appeared that the US government would outlaw convertibles by adding a roll over test to the certification process. It never happened but it delayed the convertible versions of many cars or manufacturers did what Triumph did.

      1
      • CCFisher

        That’s not the only reason. Prototypes had excessive body flex and the hoop and t-bar were the solution.

  13. Vintageant
  14. Porkchop

    Listed by a dealer… but the description reads like someone from another planet who has had the concept of a car explained to them moments ago.

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