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White Hat Special: 1967 Dodge D100 Pickup

UPDATE 3/2/24. When the truck was first listed, the seller said the rack goes with the truck. Now it reads that it can be purchased separately. Que sera!

In the late 1960s, Dodge began marketing some of its vehicles as “White Hat Specials” meaning they had white tops plus some other trim upgrades. The program applied to both cars and trucks, though pickups seemed to be the more popular. This 1967 D100 looks like a museum piece that is literally on a pedestal. It’s probably been restored and looks like the sharpest truck around. Located within a collection in Lake Forest, Illinois, it’s available here on eBay for $27,500 OBO.

From 1960 to 1993, Dodge marketed its D/W Series of trucks (D=2WD, W=4WD). The same basic platform could be found under them all along the way, although the sheet metal would differ dramatically over time. They were versatile, durable trucks that sold well enough, though they usually found themselves in third place behind Ford and Chevrolet (who kept juggling the top spot on the sales charts). The White Hat Special was an option on Dodge’s trucks and cars, so you wouldn’t find it referenced in the VIN.

We understand that besides white roofs (painted or vinyl), most WHSs had things like a white steering wheel, white visors, special full-wheel covers, and other promotional doodads. But just because a truck like the seller’s had a white roof doesn’t mean it was a White Hat Special as you could have still ordered any truck or car with one. This beautiful short-bed pickup has just 38,000 miles and – given its overall condition – why doubt its authenticity?

Since the seller says he/she bought the pickup from a dealer, that might explain why no background or history is provided. The truck looks brand new, but surely, it’s had some work done to stay this nice. The VIN decodes a V8 engine, and this one could be a 273 or 318 cubic-inch engine, but we don’t know for sure. The Mopar has an automatic transmission that’s shifted with a lever on the dashboard, something we’re told was a rare option. The stereo system is aftermarket. The truck keeps some interesting company (lots of other vintage vehicles) and the rack it sits on will be included.

Comments

  1. Avatar photo Rex Kahrs Member

    The rack comes with it? I wonder why.

    Like 9
    • Avatar photo Driveinstile Member

      Really nice clean Dodge, I was wondering the same thing about the rack. The nice thing is, you can pick it up with a forklift and move it around.

      Like 7
      • Avatar photo nhcarnut

        You can keep it all , no problem .

        Like 3
    • Avatar photo John

      The rack is NOT included. The author of this article misunderstood. If you read the ad, he states that he also sells the racks that the truck is stored on. Another clue is his username, ‘cartoyracks’.

      Like 9
      • Avatar photo Scotty Gilbertson Staff

        John, I believe the original description did say that the racks were included. I looked at this tip a few days ago before Russ snagged it and I thought the seller said the rack was included back then.

        Like 6
      • Avatar photo RKS

        John is correct on this point.

        Like 2
      • Avatar photo Russ Dixon Staff

        John, when the ad was originally posted, the write-up said the rack was included with the truck. The seller no doubt edited the listing later. Russ

        Like 6
  2. Avatar photo Al camino

    I would like to know about the yenko Chevelle behind the truck!

    Like 7
    • Avatar photo Harry

      If it’s original it’s very expensive. So there’s that.

      Like 3
  3. Avatar photo Bob C.

    Love that dash mounted shifter.

    Like 14
    • Avatar photo Fritz Basset

      My ’69 Dodge van had the same shifter; it also had the same “fly eyes” around the headlights, which IMO do not add to the appearance of the truck. 1968 or later, I would be interested as the grille was much improved.

      Like 4
    • Avatar photo Hitparader

      They were standard equipment in all D100’s equipped with an automatic in that year. Not a rare option.

      Like 0
    • Avatar photo Harold

      Like a Corvair

      Like 3
      • Avatar photo Rick

        Or a ’61 to ’63 Pontiac Tempest. Bad memories there. :(

        Like 2
  4. Avatar photo Moparman Member

    Although a diehard “Moparman”, I always felt that the Dodge pickups had an awkward throwback look, until the ’72 refresh which (at Last!) made them look more modern. That said, this is a very nice example; same shifter as in my ’69 Sportsman van! GLWTA!! :-)

    Like 12
    • Avatar photo Stephen Baker

      Ahh yes …that same “jockey stick” shifter in my poor old 71′ Superior 2200 413″RB pwrd motorhome! It on the driverside window sill! The rig awaits a good Holley carb, blinker assy, & brake re-do, ready to ROAM!!😁.S.B.

      Like 5
      • Avatar photo MG Steve

        Motorhomes built during this period, which used Mopar engines and drivetrains, used that “jockey stick” shifter. We had one of those ol’ “big ugly box” motorhomes. Had a 413. Constantly vapor locked . . . that’s why I asked the question about the wooden clothes pins. That never did an ounce of good. On someone’s advice, I finally put in a larger fuel supply line, and that fixed the problem.

        Like 3
  5. Avatar photo JustPassinThru

    Missing the right-side wiper.

    Which is possibly more important than it seems. Many states require annual inspections, and this would prevent a pass. And, parts? It’s the reverse of the typical wiper arm, since those were opposed and overlapping. And is the linkage under the cowl in place?

    IIRC, the dash shifter was standard in Dodge trucks with automatic.

    Like 6
    • Avatar photo Russ Ashley

      The wipers never over lapped. The wiper setup was changed for 68 and went to wipers that parked pointing to each other with an inch or two between the ends. The wipers weren’t syncronized to overlap and would hit if the blades were too long. Before 68 the passenger side wiper parked to the left like the drivers side did.

      Like 2
  6. Avatar photo Joe Haska

    Never heard of the white hat, very cool! I love this truck. I always suspected there could be a D-100 like this, but had never seen one until now. I am just finishing 73 Ford P/U, that is the, twin to this truck in condition and equipment. I love it, but if I had known about this truck, it would be no contest. The price of this truck is almost exactly what I have in my Ford.

    Like 7
  7. Avatar photo geomechs Member

    Lots of these out west back in the day. The local dealer also sold John Deere farm equipment so a lot of customers who needed parts and service for their tractors often drove home with a considerably larger package. Corporations like John Deere and Chrysler frowned deeply on the practice of having more than one franchise in the same building but back then it was grudgingly accepted. And back in the 60s there was really no harm because the two lines complimented each other.

    A few years down the road the local dealer shut down and a group of farmers pooled their resources to pick up the John Deere franchise, which I started working for after I got out of school. It wasn’t long before we also picked up GMC, Pontiac-Buick, and the tensions were on between the major corporations again. But it was no different than it was years before; a guy came in to buy parts for his tractor or combine and often hauled them home in a new pickup.

    This truck is very nice. You could go out and put it right to work or just use it to haul the beer to the picnic. I wouldn’t use it as a trailer queen. It might even haul some sheep dooey for the garden. Oh, of course I’d wash it out afterwards! And I would display it at the local show’n’shine.

    I couldn’t help but notice the orange engine. I always thought they were red back then, even a few years after Chrysler dropped the Poly-head. But those decals: Industrial? Okay, back then I saw a lot of Chrysler power units pumping irrigation water, and they were orange. I am still curious as to why an industrial engine is under the hood here. No harm, it just veers away from the original appearance.

    And, I can’t leave without a real negative comment: I do NOT condone a rubber fuel line/plastic filter in the pressure side of the fuel pump. There was a steel line there before and it should remain that way. Put the filter in the suction side and run steel to the carburetor. I had to say that because in the years I was in the repair business I saw too many arrangements like this turn into a Roman candle. I was stupid enough to practice it–ONCE–and I had a fire. Luckily, I had a good sized fire extinguisher in the truck and was able to put it out without any damage…

    Like 26
    • Avatar photo Fubard

      Always sound advice. There’s an important reason manufacturers used metal lines with flared fittings. No rubber, no plastic, no hose clamps.

      Like 7
    • Avatar photo Yblocker

      The motor in this truck should be Chrysler blue, the earlier 318 “A”s were red

      Like 3
      • Avatar photo geomechs Member

        Chrysler Blue? Ok, but I always thought that blue didn’t apply to the truck engines until ‘68 or ‘69. My friend had a ‘67 pickup similar to this but with a 318 Poly. I distinctly remember it being red because I helped him pull it out. I remember him selling it a few years down the road and getting a ‘71 Adventurer with a 383. That engine was Chrysler Blue. I might add that Dad had a ‘68 Chrysler Newport with a 383 which was the new blue.

        I think, sometimes, that new color changes don’t make it to all plants at the same time. In 1977 GM introduced GM Corporate Blue engine paint. All Pontiacs, Buicks and GMCs that we sold had Corporate Blue engines. Dad bought a ‘77 Chevy pickup with a 454 and that engine was orange. I heard a couple of mechanics at other dealerships say that 454 engines were painted orange well into the model year. Kind of makes it confusing if you want to restore a truck to concourse standards…

        Like 3
      • Avatar photo Yblocker

        My dad had a friend who bought a new 67 Dodge pickup, with a 318 “LA”, and it was blue. 67 was the first year for the LA

        Like 1
      • Avatar photo kenzo

        In the engine close up the valve cover has a sticker showing Chrysler Industrial. The front bumper, as mentioned further down, doesn’t look correct as the ends don’t appear to match the fender shape.
        Cheers
        Kenzo

        Like 1
    • Avatar photo Rick

      I’ve always heard that the filter should be between the pump and the carburetor, as pumps do a better job of pushing than pulling. A partially clogged filter would really reduce the fuel volume if it was placed between the tank and the pump, but it wouldn’t be as bad when placed upstream of the pump.

      Like 0
  8. Avatar photo Hitparader

    With all due respect to the author, there’s a lot of reason to doubt the truck’s authenticity. Front bumper, mirrors, air cleaner are not original. Hood emblem missing. Engine bay should be body color, not black, and the roof paint is wrong (although that could be the lighting). And every D100 with an automatic in 1967 had the dash shifter, it was not a rare option. White hat special was really just a sales promotion of discounted options, in fact on cars there was no requirement the roof had to be white.

    Like 0
  9. Avatar photo Stan Partin

    Beautiful truck. Regarding the fuel line, I have a ’62 Town Wagon with a 225 Slant Six. The steel fuel line was routed along the top of the head where on a hot summer day I often experienced vapor lock or fuel bubbling out of the top of the Carter carb bowl. Talk about a fire hazard! I replaced the steel line with a simple rubber one and had no further problems.

    Like 6
    • Avatar photo Fubard

      Couple of wooden clothespins on the metal line would have cured that problem a lot more safely…..

      Like 4
      • Avatar photo MGSteve

        For years, I’ve heard about wooden clothes pin curing vapor lock. I’ve tried it, and can’t say it worked. Could you/or someone, please explain how this works . . . or is supposed to work? A big thanks in advance.

        Like 4
      • Avatar photo Fubard

        MGSteve. The wood pulls heat off the line and dissipates it. Worked every time I needed it to.

        Like 0
  10. Avatar photo Bob Washburne Member

    Slicing a rubber line length-wise and slipping it over the steel feed is what I did on my ’73 Dart Custom 225 6 to cure that.

    Lot of VW bug fires happened because of plastic fuel filters in that hot engine compartment. Filter was factory-installed just under the gas tank, which is, admittedly an awkward spot to get at.

    I probably have the asking price in my ’65 Econoline

    Like 5
  11. Avatar photo Stan Partin

    Tried that to no avail.
    Thousands of miles with no problems.

    Like 4
  12. Avatar photo Rex Kahrs Member

    I think the white hats were part of the “Dodge Rebellion.”

    Like 13
  13. Avatar photo Yblocker

    I’m pretty sure they never put a 273 in a truck. The white hat thing was a sales gimmick. “The Good Guys, with the Great Buys”. Good guys wear white hats, remember? Lol. Don Knotts also did Dodge truck adds back then. There’s no way this is the original color scheme on this truck. And the “DODGE” letters are missing from the front of the hood, also, the front bumper is from a 72 or newer truck, it doesn’t even look right. The truck is far from original

    Like 7
    • Avatar photo Yblocker

      And the steering wheel is incorrect

      Like 1
      • Avatar photo stillrunners Member

        At least it’s Mopar….

        Like 0
    • Avatar photo jwaltb

      They put ‘em in vans. I had one.

      Like 0
  14. Avatar photo geezerglide 85

    When I worked in a gas station (’74-’76) a customer had a truck similar to this. It was blue with a white textured top, white interior and automatic with the dash control. When ever the owner dropped it off for repairs he always specified that the motor was a 381i (industrial motor). I don’t remember what color it was. Truck was in great shape and had over 200,000 miles on it.

    Like 2
  15. Avatar photo stillrunners Member

    Yep….lot of wrong stuff on this truck….how could they want that much ?

    Like 4
    • Avatar photo Rick

      How could they want that much? There’s a sucker born every minute and the Mecum and Barrett-Jackson mentality also comes into play.

      Like 4
  16. Avatar photo Jolly Joe

    If anyone knows cost and where to get the racks, please post here. Great idea this cat has

    Like 0
  17. Avatar photo Ffred

    Could have easily bent up a steel fuel line that would fit between the alternator and engine and mount the fuel filter on top the intake manifold. I’ve never seen Corporate Blue paint in 1967. All the poly and LA small blocks I’ve seen from that period are red. The engine looks to be painted Race Hemi orange. I have a set of nos wheel covers for sale that fit this truck…

    Like 1
  18. Avatar photo jim

    Wrong air cleaner looks like a GM air cleaner with that long round snout
    Someone put this truck together using what they had

    Like 1
    • Avatar photo stillrunners Member

      Correct Jim…..looks to be about a 1968 Chevy air cleaner…

      Like 0
  19. Avatar photo John

    Ah brings back memories. I was a poor boy and needed a truck. Picked up a ’72 for $200 that looked like it had slid down the road on the passenger side. My friends said that happened because I was leaning over to kiss a fat girl and tipped the truck over! As soon as I could afford something better I sold it and that was my good memory, watching its tail lights disappearing in the distance. BTW I never dated fat girls, I swear!!

    Like 2
  20. Avatar photo stillrunners Member

    Anybody figure out what front bumper that is – it’s not a Dodge !

    Like 0
    • Avatar photo Yblocker

      Sure is

      Like 0
  21. Avatar photo Fish56

    Could have bought a similar, nice truck last fall at a Car Show/Swapmeet.

    Like 0
    • Avatar photo Fish56

      Very clean 1967 D200 with a 318, auto. $10,500 obo.

      Like 1

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