100 Year Old Owner: 1992 Pontiac Sunbird

I can’t imagine living to be 100 years old let alone driving at that age! Yet, that’s what the story is with this 1992 Pontiac Sunbird convertible, according to the seller who has it listed here on Craigslist in Elk River, Minnesota. They’re asking $2,900 for this seemingly well-preserved Sunbird.

One hundred years, that’s a long time in human terms. I know that the earth is over four billion years old and the U.S. is 243 years old, and some other countries are much older than that. Still, 100 years is a long time. World War I had just ended about a year before the original owner of this Sunbird was born. There are around 72,000 Americans over the age of 100 now, do you know anyone who has made it to 100 years old? If so, were they driving at that age?

This Sunbird droptop has just over 101,000 miles on it which is an average of around 3,700 miles a year; not a lot. The previous owner would have been around 77 years old when they bought this Pontiac new and that’s just cool. I don’t know who that owner was but I like the fact that they bought a new convertible at age 77. This is a second-generation Pontiac Sunbird but it’s from the facelift era coming after 1989. They ended production of the Sunbird after the 1994 model year.

As expected, the interior looks like it’s also in great condition and it has an automatic transmission – GM’s three-speed Turbo-Hydramatic 125 for transverse-mounted engines. There are no engine photos, unfortunately, but it has GM’s LE4 2.0L inline-four with 110-hp and 124 ft-lb of torque. This car runs and drives perfectly according to the seller, who is a car dealer. For not much money, a person would have a fun little summer cruiser with an interesting ownership story. Can you see yourself living to be 100 years old? If so, what vehicle would you hope to be driving?

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Comments

  1. Superdessucke

    Fresh air is good for longevity apparently!

    Like 13
  2. Dusty Rider

    My aunt just decided to stop driving at 99. She still starts her car (2000 Camry XLE) and drives it around the retirement community to keep it operating. She says it gives her comfort to still have it and could go if she felt like it.

    Like 16
  3. SusanOliver

    Once you hit Medicare age you should be required to take a behind the wheel exam annually. Mile per mile driven, geriatric drivers are far more dangerous then even 16 year old boys or girls on cell phones. There must be a few exceptions, but I am willing to bet that there are very few centurions who are safe behind the wheel. We need to get serious about this. Self driving cars should be required if you fail a test to drive on your own.

    Like 9
    • FordGuy1972 FordGuy1972 Member

      I’d be interested to see how you would react to being re-tested when you retire. My guess is you won’t be happy about it. My mother is 93 and still drives. She doesn’t drive at night or travel on the highway. Mostly she just drives to do her shopping; short trips in the town she lives in. She lived through the Depression, struggled through WWII rationing and raised 5 young kids by herself when she was widowed. She’s still sharp and fiercely independent; as far as I’m concerned, she can drive as long as she wants.

      If the state wants to re-test me, they can test my middle driving finger. That works very well.

      Like 58
      • Oldhater

        You’ll change your tune when she causes an accident or worse. If you have a 93 year old mother you’re getting close to too old to drive too

        Like 6
      • Mike

        I agree with you 110%!

    • CanuckCarGuy

      Here in Ontario Canada, once you hit 80 (and every two years after) there’s a required vision test, education session and review of driving theory…if necessary a road test is conducted. In a perfect world it shouldn’t be necessary, but if your ability to continue living independently relies on driving, not everyone will voluntarily hang up their keys unfortunately.

      Like 18
      • SusanOliver

        Smart people, those Canadians.

        Like 15
      • MotorWinder

        And yes, although a good start, NOT perfect … I’ve met many who’ve had their license taken away because they failed on the driving portion of that Ontario retest …

        My thoughts are that MANY get nervous with that “official” inside the car, as well their are those examiners that come to work with days of “attitude” … one small mistake and your gone!!!

        My suggestion for ALL driving test, give the driver a planed fixed course/map to follow, have the examiners follow behind and observe … one you will allow the driver to relax more and secondly they may just relax to the point they return to their BAD habits!

        Point being, how many times we follow behind someone and think they should never have a license!!!

        Like 3
    • DNC

      Medicare age ? Seriously ? At 62, I can probably drive circles around you. What a stupid thing to say.

      Like 14
      • MotorWinder

        agreed, I’m almost 62 … absurd, hence the 80 age here in Ontario is logical. In fact some up here voluntarily give up their license as 80.

        Like 5
    • Vince

      Hey Susie I hope you never get old. I’m 80, drive a Fiat 124 Spider manual and often drive at 100 mph. Why don’t you try criticizing the four foot ten ladies driving large SUV’s that don’t know beans about driving.

      Like 15
      • SusanOliver

        100 MPH in a Fiat proves your judgement is gone. Though, I do agree, little old ladies in 3 tons of iron scares me more then you do in the 124.

        Like 5
    • Johnny

      What is your age? Where do you get the knowledge to compare someone on medicare who drives and a 16 year old tailgating on the phone? Someone who worked all their life and the hardships they went through and you want to take their last bit of own helping away from them? Sit down and start paying attention around you. You just might learn something/ You won,t be young forever and remember that.

  4. Pete

    Mom voluntarily turned in her license at 95. Her sight had bothered her.
    She had no accidents on her driving record. I can’t even claim that!

    Like 8
    • Moe

      But how many accidents did she cause ??

      Like 1
  5. Angel_Cadillac_Diva Angel Cadillac Diva Member

    BOO, Susan! Yay, Fordguy!
    My father recently passed at age 97. He stopped driving around 92.
    I’m 66 and if the state wants to retest my driving skills they can kiss my …..
    I haven’t had an accident since I was 20, despite all the fools out there.

    Like 23
    • Jack M.

      Unfortunately, the only way to catch all the fools out there is to retest EVERYONE every 10 years. I would gladly take the retest to get some of these dumb asses off of the roads.

      Like 14
      • SusanOliver

        Jack, run for president, you would have my vote. Of course we all love to drive, thats why we are on this site, but come on guys, how many times have you heard of an elderly person driving into a building or something like that? Face it, like said above, independent living in many places requires a car, but when does your independence endanger public safety? Senility creeps up on us all, and when do we cross the line where we are impaired? Will we know it? I recall several years back where a 95 year old drove on a bike path, ran over a jogger, and was angry when he soon there after hit a power pole. He kept revving the engine unable to figure out why he wasn’t moving when someone grabbed the keys out of his ignition. He got out of the car and took a swing at that person, while the lifeless 50 year old joggers body was still crumpled up under the car! Longevity is wonderful, but we need to have common sense as a society.

        Like 12
      • MotorWinder

        But Susan, at what age is one “Elderly”?

        Like 4
      • SusanOliver

        @Motorwinder, elderly varies. Some 95 year olds might be just fine to drive, my example, I guess not. We need to test annually after age 65 (of which I am BTW) to be sure. Elderly is like pornography, hard to qualify, but you know it when you see it. Trouble is, presently many see it, but no one is doing anything about it. Politicians are scared because old people all vote, plus they have the cash to donate. They will not touch this issue, we need to demand it. How many of you post middle age types out there THINK you will be a great driver right up until the day the mortician closes the lid? Should you alone be allowed to make that choice when you must share the road with me? I feel it should not be our choice, we need testing when we begin driving, and we need testing during our last years driving. This isn’t rocket science. Again I ask, why isn’t anyone commenting on the solution, the self driving car?

        Like 2
  6. Geoff

    My grandfather passed away in his sleep at the age of 96, about a month after buying a brand new Mercedes E320. He was a WWII Colonel and never had an accident in his whole time driving. At least he had that month to enjoy his new Benz before he passed.

    Like 15
    • SusanOliver

      Yes, life is not fair.

      Like 2
    • Moe

      again how many accidents did he cause ??

      Like 1
      • Miguel

        Are you saying it would be his fault if other people can’t control their cars?

  7. Bob S

    I had 2 aunts that both decided to retire their licenses at ages 97 and 98, never any accidents. I feel you have to treat it on an individual basis. I know of people in their 30’s and 40’s with no business being behind the wheel of a motor vehicle. As far as the car is concerned, seems like a decent deal on a nice driver quality car.

    Like 11
  8. Kirt matson

    You had me until you said car dealer! Come on guys it’s really that slow that you list cars for sale from used car dealers?? Ya they can tell a good story to move a car🤨

    Like 3
  9. Tom Henderson

    100 year old man? Yeah right, since everything a used car salesman says is always true. Little old lady only drove it to church on Sundays. Give me a break!

    Like 7
  10. Bob S

    Why’s that so hard to believe Tom? I had a neighbor that just passed less than a year ago at 100 years old, drove a 2015 Toyota Corolla that was a dealer lease, the car had 16,000 miles on it when it was turned in at the end of the lease.

    Like 4
    • SusanOliver

      Before I retired, I worked in a nursing home. I watch a lot of people come to visit “those old folks”. The elderly visitors driving was awful. They parked at bad angles, perpendicular seemed to be difficult for them. At least every few months some elderly visitor hit another car in the parking lot. The workers parked as far away from the entrances as possible to protect their own cars. No one who has any experience being around elderly drivers on a daily basis would have any problem with the idea of annual BEHIND THE WHEEL exams to continue driving. I recall one fellow who shook so bad with Parkinsons Disease that he froze coming through the door and sometimes the staff had to hold the door for him five minutes or more because he was “stuck” with the door open before he could walk again. He used to fall in the parking lot, usually every time he was there, and a staffer had to get him off the ground because he couldn’t do it himself. After his third accident, the police had his doctor report him to the state DMV. They made him take a written test, not a driving test! So he go a licence back for eight years!

      Like 8
  11. David P. Reeves

    My great grandfather in-law lived to be 101 before passing in his own home in his sleep. He drove his wife and children to their favorite restaurant for his 100th birthday dinner, and my aunt has it on camera! He hung up his keys shortly after because it hurt his hips too bad to get down into their Buick Lucerne.

    Like 2
  12. nycbjr Member

    Let’s talk about the car maybe? I had an 89 se, 5 speed! Fun car to drive.. first car I paid for on my own… Put in a CD player in that lower console, hooked to 2 10″ subwoofer cannons lol.. ah to be in my 20s again 🤪

    Like 8
    • Dusty Rider

      Sorry, NY, this issue is more important, evidently, than that Sunbird. Lots of us are seeing this issue (decision) in our future, and we like making up our own minds. I would think that more young people are having accidents than we are for miles driven, not that you think otherwise, my friend.

      Like 1
      • SusanOliver

        Dusty, unfortunately often times people lose the ability to make up their own mind, the mind is already gone, or they know they shouldn’t be driving, but they keep doing so anyway. Accidents of young people versus octogenarians? The stats are very clear. Young people have far more accidents, but only because they drive far many more miles. But if they drive equal miles, it isn’t even close, the average retiree is much more dangerous on the road, look it up, it should scare us all. I know from experience, I am retired and I am no where near the driver I once was. Not ready to hang up the keys yet, but I have told my family that I EXPECT them to step in when I am no longer safe, no matter how mad it makes me. In fact, I have it in writing, notarized as well, in a safety deposit box at the bank. This issue is indeed more important then some old Pontiac, our society needs to address it, and soon. Us Boomers are growing old, forgetful, and often cranky. We have money and power, but brain cells have been lost.

        Like 3
    • Tony Primo

      What, there was a car?

      Like 8
  13. art

    Ooooowhee, Scotty! A lesson here…NEVER disclose the age of the vehicles’ owner.!!!
    Toxic…lol
    Go back to very graphic discussions of torn upholstery, worn carpets, missing radios, and engines not being detailed. Maybe even the frequent, incorrect use of “delete”, much safer stuff.

    Like 4
  14. SusanOliver

    Okay, struck a nerve here, sorry about that. Why has no one commented on my idea of self driving cars for elderly who are no longer safe? I myself look forward to the idea, even though driving is one of my greatest pleasures. If we are no longer safe on the road and endanger others, it is a great way to keep our independence.

    Like 6
    • Mike

      Maybe because most “elderly” people are living on fixed incomes and can’t possibly afford ANY new car, let alone a “self driving” car? If YOU look forward to self driving cars, thats fine. Just stay away from me in case a wire in all those electronics shorts out, or a fuse blows, causing the car to “freak out” and crash into everything and everyone around you.

      Like 1
    • Miguel

      Susan, that would be because self driving cars don’t exist and won’t for a long time to come.

      Actually I think they do have them. I think they call them Uber or Lyft.

      Like 2
  15. Mark P

    To those stating people in their sixties should turn in their license I say how about them turning in their game contollers at 25, drive a real vehicle not the versions in Grand Theft Auto.

    Like 1
  16. Bernie

    I think in-car testing at license renewal after age 80 is a good idea but maybe it should start at 75. Vision and comprehension/reaction testing at 70 is appropriate too because of faster speeds and traffic congestion. I love to drive and consider myself an average driver-three tickets and one accident in 41 years of driving-and I know I’m not as sharp as I once was. Autonomous cars would enable older drivers to maintain their mobility and keep distracted drivers of all ages from injuring others. Distracted drivers cause a third of all accidents and pose a greater danger to public safety than any other single accident factor.

    Like 4
  17. Andrew Franks

    I applaud the FordGuy and don’t agree with Susan Oliver about self driving cars which i won’t touch or go near. i think technology is destroying us. I use it because I have no choice. I am 82 years old, still driving and expanding my collection. Those closest to me have written instructions regarding disposal of the collection upon my death, and as soon as the dementia diagnosis comes, I give up my drivers license. I have been driving since I was 14 years old. A computer will never be able to react to spontaneous human behavior such as sudden change of mind while crossing a street. And other phenomenology. It is the classic arrogance of single skilled people who are socially illiterate.

    Like 6
    • SusanOliver

      You obviously are surrounded by people who will keep an eye on you, what about people who have no one? They slowly sink into severe dementia and no one is there to wittiness it, yet they still drive, still have that Luger under the pillow to shoot at all the things they think are lurking in their room at night. The other day an elderly guy shot his care giver. Why did he even have a gun at that point? A car can be just as deadly. Our society has these grandiose ideas about personal freedom yet they get quiet when these practical problems are mentioned?

      Like 4
  18. charlie Member

    You think an elderly person who can’t manage a cell phone or a remote for a TV will be able to operate a self driving car? Even with voice commands? Try to teach your average elderly person to use “hey Google”, or Google Maps.

    In NH you get road tested every 5 years after 85, my uncle at 95 could barely walk, but refused a walker let alone a wheel chair, since once used he thought he would never get back to just a cane.

    In NH you have to have a licensed driver with you, in case you fail.

    I rode shotgun, he was doing his usual 50 in a 35 zone, told him to slow down.
    Hobbled into DMV, told state trooper (they administer road tests) that he drove a hell of a lot better than he walked. Trooper sent him out ahead to get into his 25 year old Chevy Caprice, he took the test, Trooper came back in way ahead, thumbs up, told me, “You are right, he does drive a hell of a lot better than he walks”. A year later his body deteriorated and told me he was done driving, and at 96, gave up. He too avoided interstates and driving at night.

    Mother-in-law had several avoidable fender benders in her early 90’s, macular degeneration, she just could not see well, no cure, she gave her Olds Alero to a grandchild. The Cutlass saved Oldsmobile for a decade, the Alero helped kill it.

    And, as for the Sunbird, a great little car for driving around town in good weather with the top down. I bought a convertible when I retired, and still have it, and drive it around town, top down, spring, summer and fall.

    Like 5
    • SusanOliver

      If you are too mentally frail to tell your car where you want to go, do you really think you are safe to drive that 2 ton Caddie down the road? As far as elderly people being intimidated by cranky DMV testers, that is easy, have artificial intellegence decide. A camera and a computer in the car makes the decision, who could argue with that? Either you meet the criteria or you do not. People who make excuses for obviously impaired drivers bother me. Drivers can be impaired by many things, alcohol, distracted driving, being tired, and yes, old age. All need to be monitored. Statistically, the chance of a fatal accident is low for any one person with these things happening, but if you are that statistic on the wrong side of the equation, then it matters, doesn’t it?

      Like 3
  19. Del

    I am going to buy this for my Grand Pa.

    He is 106.

    He will benefit from previous owners cache.

    Like 4
    • SusanOliver

      I am sure he will appreciate the gesture, just as soon as his nurse spoon feds him his pudding and changes his pad.

      Like 3
      • MotorWinder

        Susan, therein lies the problem … you work in the “aging” industry. You see that world around you daily and are convinced of it as being the norm not the exception, maybe it even scares you. Truth is most of us will not end up with Dementia or Alzheimer’s … that is not the reality that most of us will face. And should anyone of us reach that point of being spoon fed, it’s very unlikely that we would be capable of making it to our car let alone know how to start it !!!!

        Like 5
      • SidHartman

        @MotorMinder, New to this forum, but I find this discussion amazing. Such differences in opinion to be sure. I think the discussion is quite relevant here, no matter how uncomfortable it makes people. Mr Minder, Susan may work in a nursing home, but she said many of the visitors who came, also elderly, were very bad drivers. I also tghink her comment above is sarcastic, but her point is well taken. What is wrong with testing to be sure people are capable of propelling one or more tons of steel on a public highway where we all could be in danger? What are people afraid of? Afraid that they know they are not the drivers they once were and want to ignore or hide the fact? Face it, not driving is a pain and for me, a loss of joy, but if you are not safe, it matters not. I am with Susan, no matter how painful it may be.

        Like 1
  20. Comet

    I’ve ridden motorcycles for the last 40 years averaging 20,000 miles annually. I can’t count the times I’ve had close calls due to distracted drivers primarily using their cell phones while casually engaged in driving. This practice seems to be more accepted as time goes on. Years ago they would try to hide their phones while driving, now they don’t care who sees them. I’ll take an old timer behind the wheel anytime.

    Like 6
  21. Tim

    Let’s be honest, few if any of us that frequent this site look forward to relinquishing our car keys, but this site is about the pleasure we derive from driving our collectible cars not a forum for debating AARP topics. I enjoy & appreciate all the writing staff.

    Like 1
  22. Greg

    If I lived in Toronto, I would be glad to give up my license with the TTC I could go everywhere that is important to me. I really enjoyed my time in Toronto. Our apartment even had a terminal in the basement. So did the office where I worked. Shirtsleeves in the dead of Winter. Wonderful place. No need for a car.

    Like 1
    • SusanOliver

      As a society, Canada has its act together in so many ways. So close, yet we keep ignoring all the goodness that should rub off on us.

      Like 3
  23. Angel_Cadillac_Diva Angel Cadillac Diva Member

    @SusanOliver
    I was really under the impression that one of the rules of this site was no politics, but since you opened that can of worms, I’m going to voice my opinion
    You, and people like you are the reason this country is becoming a lost cause. You want the government to make decisions for you. Let’s take a few more rights away. After all, it’s only right. But history will prove, the minute the government takes one right away, it goes bonkers trying to take ALL rights away.
    Right now from your answers I am pissed. And this shouldn’t be a political arena, but, as I said, you opened the can of worms.

    Like 7
    • SusanOliver

      Your rights are VERY important, but they end where my rights begin. My rights end where yours begin. Understand? You have the right of self determination, but not if it endangers me as I express my right to travel on a public road if you are in some way impaired. I am sorry if I have offended anyone, never my intention. Just something I feel very strongly about. BTW, how is this in any way a political argument? How we run the basic functions of government should be above politics.

      Like 2
    • TheGasHole

      Driving a car is a privledge, not a right.

  24. Stevieg

    Susan Oliver, you have said a few things in the past that offended me, but you really went to a whole new level this time.
    I am sure you mean well, but that is a heck of a condescending attitude you have today.
    I was in a motorcycle accident earlier this year, caused by a young girl texting and driving. I never felt threatened by an elderly driver. Ever. But now young drivers, who tend to text while driving far more than the elderly, scare the heck out of me.
    If I adopted your logic, I would just say that because the young person who hit me was female, then women drivers scare me lol. Not the case, but that is very similar to your logic.
    I am not saying don’t have an opinion. I am not saying that I don’t want you to share your opinion (there were a couple times I actually did like your input), but please try to be more respectful and less condescending in your posts. Treat others as you want to be treated.
    There are people of all ages that shouldn’t be behind the wheel.
    As for this Pontiac, I’ve owned a couple of these over the years. Most were hard tops, 1 convertible. My convertible was horrible, but it was neglected & pretty rough when I bought it. I liked them all, except for that convertible. That being said, this appears to be a nice, well maintained car. If I was already relocated to Arizona, this would make a great daily driver for me. I would really enjoy this little car.

    Like 3
    • SusanOliver

      Sorry to hear about your cycle accident, hope you have fully recovered. Texting (kids usually) scare me to. We need to strongly fix that problem as well. Gee, people really have strong opinions on this topic. All I really wanted to say was that I feel self driving cars for those who shouldn’t be driving is a good idea. (if they can beat a Jeopardy champion, they can drive better then us). Never would have expected such a response.I am going to have to give up driving, maybe in ten years or so, it will be hard for me, but not nearly as hard as it would be if I seriously injured or killed another person. How could any of us live with that? Self responsibility is something we should all embrace, esp in our older years, no matter how difficult.

      Like 2
  25. Dusty Rider

    Sorry I brought this age thing up. I was just celebrating my Aunt’s longevity and ability to decide on her own to quit driving.

    Like 2
  26. dyno dan

    Susan Oliver. My Hero!!

    Like 2
  27. Comet

    SusanOliver, As they say opinions are like, mmm… never mind. Compassion doesn’t seem to be your strong suit. Your blanket statements concerning drivers ability based on age seem a bit biased. Are you willing to endure a huge increase in your taxes to cover all the additional DVM staff and facilities required to implement your ideas? Older folks abilities and reactions vary. Ask John Force, I believe he just turned 70. Last time I checked he had pretty good reactions behind the wheel.

    Like 1
    • Mike

      John Force is THE MAN! If you’ve never met him in person, I sincerly hope that you get to someday. I’ve met and talked to him several times at Norwalk over the years. He TRULY is the way you see him on TV all the time. I think he’s got at least one more championship in him too!

  28. Mike

    Soooo…how did this go from commenting on a particular vehicle, to who should and shouldn’t be allowed to drive ANY vehicle? It’s a pretty nice car for what it is. Probably one of the nicest ones available for anyone looking for one like it. There aren’t many of them left in any condition.

    • SidHartman

      New to the site, but isn’t that the way many conversations go? Subjects change, people talk about what they want to talk about, it makes life interesting, and I like this conversation. Though I can relate to both sides, I think Sue has made many good points, and has been respectful despite what many here have accused her of.

      Like 1
  29. Miguel

    These were sold in Mexico, but every one of them had the 3.1 V6. I don’t know why the 4 cylinder wasn’t available, but that is what they sold here.

    As a side note, they called this car a Cavalier. The car had the Sunbird body, but it did not have that awful Sunbird dashboard, but rather the Cavalier dashboard.

    I really like the Z-24 versions with the partially covered headlights.

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