1967 Ford Mustang Barn Find

1967 Ford Mustang Barn Find

Josh and I were just saying how much we miss our old Mustang. I wonder how she’s doing out there in the the wilds of San Francisco. Hopefully, she is still chugging along. The memories of driving that base-model Mustang along the tree-lined back roads of the Oregon coast make me want this dust covered ’67 badly. The inline-six used in these cars may always sit in the shadow of the V8, but personally I think it’s a great little engine and when paired with a manual transmission, can actually be quite fun to drive. This one benefits from the better all syncro 3-speed transmission too! It’s probably going to need more work than meets the eye, but as with any barn find, you never know. Find this one here on eBay where bidding started at $1,000. It’s located in Dayton, Ohio and includes a clear title.

Fast Finds

Comments

  1. J.W.

    I traded a car for one of these back in the 80’s to restore as a present to my wife, well 7K later and still not happy with the rust condition of northern Illinois I gave up and traded it for another driver car. If this car has been in Ohio all it’s life and kept in a non climate controlled building RUN because it’s a 6 banger so not worth much and you will have more in it to just be safe and presentable than it’s worth. Just my experience with Midwest ruststangs.

  2. Jarod Rose

    I always wondered how those straight 6’s drove. When they are in cars like a Jaguar E-Type and BMW M3 the engine has to have some character to it. I always wondered if the 6 helped handling

  3. Chris

    The straight 6 will be lighter than the V8, but its a longer engine. So the V8’s heavier weight is further back in the car, so the weight difference over the front wheels may not be that great.

    Others with more Frod/Mustang knowledge will be able to confirm/deny.

  4. Karl

    Is that a golf club holding up the hood? Throw that in and it’s a deal.

  5. Karl

    More seriously, I did own a 1965 six-cylinder Mustang. It had the older 3-speed that was non-synchronized in 1st and reverse, manual steering, 4-wheel drum brakes. The option list? I just wrote it out.
    How did it drive? Actually not bad. It was no sports car, but it was very light, which helped braking and steering considerably. With a little practice, shifting was easy; you had to feel for first gear with the shifter, and once you got into first, it was cake. I eventually sold it because I moved out my parents’ hose and needed the money. It was my first restoration project and maybe my last, but I’d love to get another shot at one.

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