20 Years Stored: 1970 Jaguar E-Type

This 1970 Jaguar E-Type coupe is said to be fresh out of long-term storage and owned by the same family for the last 35 years. It’s a desirable four-speed manual transmission example and still runs, but the clutch slave cylinder no longer works. Still, that’s a minor issue for a car like the E-Type that’s been laid up for 20 years and isn’t exactly known for rolling out in the daylight running under its own power. The seller is a first-time seller on eBay, so some level of trust and/or in-person inspection will be needed if you’re the cautious type, and given this E-Type is in my backyard, I’m happy to help with this if I can. Find the Jaguar here on eBay with a suggested opening bid of $10,000 and no action yet.

There is a reserve, which makes sense given $10K would be cheap to take home a running E-Type coupe. The seller reports there is some rust to sort out and that the E-Type needs complete restoration if you seek perfection – but I would leave much of it as-is provided the rust isn’t terminal, as the interior looks to be in decent shape and the outside isn’t a horror show, either. The only real shame is it appears to have been a British Racing Green example given the paint inside the door jambs, and the seller does acknowledge it was previously repainted. The chrome bumpers look like they’d come back to life with some elbow grease and it retains its factory wire wheels.

The engine bay is complete and apparently at least marginally healthy, given it still fires up despite presumably not seeing much in the way of regular use. The seller doesn’t report on any previous maintenance or a compression test to validate the health of the engine, but just seeing a car like the E-Type that’s not completely pulled apart after years in storage is an encouraging sign. The Jaguar is located in Rhode Island, which doesn’t title vehicles over a certain age – so if you’re hoping to buy this as a flip car, be forewarned that you won’t have a title to go along with it. Also, the E-Type is missing its original A/C compressor and factory jack and tools.

The interior needs a solid cleaning but it’s really not bad for an unrestored car. It doesn’t say where the Jaguar was stored, but it was presumably indoors given there’s not a lot of evidence of sun damage. I wonder if a re-dye would bring this leather back to life, and the door panels and dash look even better. This is a later car so it loses the cool aircraft-style switches, but that also means the sale price should be lower than that of a genuine Series 1 car. Without any pictures of the rust, it’s hard to say just how much of a project this will be, but what we can see looks promising.

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Comments

  1. JACKinNWPA JACKinNWPA Member

    Well slap me silly and call me stupid but I believe that it still is BRG and was painted with lacquer and a good buff would bring it back. I would do that and drive it as I made more needed upgrades. I wonder what the reserve is? I’m guessing $35,000.00.

    Like 3
  2. Sfm5

    Some cars from this era just look much better without a top. This car and the AC Cobra are two such examples that come to mind. Looks like a nice project car.

    Like 2
  3. Joe Machado

    The speedo gauge appears to have water and some kind of worm patterns behind lens.
    Hurricane Sandy victum?
    I have a friend in Portland, Maine and Boston goin to have a look.
    Film at 11

    Like 7
  4. wuzjeepnowsaab

    With full restoration on these running into 6 figure territory this looks like a labor of love out of the gate unless the rust isn’t too bad…which it almost always is

    Like 2
  5. 86_Vette_Convertible

    This must be the year of the E type, there’s been so many lately I’m surprised.
    Love the styling but not the reliability of British cars.

  6. ron alexander

    As someone who has restored these e types………I say buyer beware, I see signs of 135000 miles all over this”victim”……this will require a total , down to the last nut and bolt restoration…..I have never seen such neglect and disregard for the badge….Jaguar…….I am in such pain!

    Like 4
    • Eric_13cars Eric_13cars Member

      You haven’t seen my 71 OTS. This one is great in comparison.

      Like 2
  7. Joe

    Is this not a 2+2? I would have thought that would have been brought into the discussion with regard to relative values

    Like 3
  8. Kurt

    This one still looks better than the lime green one above…

    Like 2
  9. Laurence

    I would say that the original leather is too far gone for cleaning and re-colouring, as it is severely cracked. Fortunately new upholstery kits are available from Moss and others. The cam covers are incorrect, from a Series I. On the Series II they are black with alloy ribs, for better heat dissipation. As for Mr. ’86 Vette’s comment: Jags of the Sir William Lyons era are reliable, even though they are exotic. To be reliable, though, they have to be competently maintained according to the owner’s manual. Your average service station mechanic who only really knows about V-8s, is only going to make a mess of such a Jag. A ‘mechanic” is just not good enough for a car like this. It has to be an experienced Jaguar mechanic who is well-versed in the classics. You wouldn’t expect a typical v-8 mechanic to work on a classic Ferrari or Aston Martin. The exact same thing goes for E Types.

    Like 2
  10. Matthew Middleton

    I love E-Types/XKE’s but there’s a point that should be made more often. When a proper restoration shop replaces panels or does any welding on these the body needs to be in a jig. Beware of any amateur bodywork as it’s easy to deform the monocoque and twist the whole structure.

    • Kurt

      Sounds complicated! I have never worked with a jig, can a person build one?

  11. Araknid78

    Item location:
    Providence, Rhode Island

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